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Human Geography
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Curated by Matthew Wahl
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Hi Everyone!

Hi Everyone! | Human Geography | Scoop.it

My name is Matt Wahl and I am a second year teacher at Dundee-Crown High School in Carpentersville, Illinois. I originally started using Scoop.it as a place to save articles that I found for AP human geography since my favorites bar was getting too full. I would like to thank everyone for posting articles that I have “scooped” for my class. As a first-year teacher in an AP class last year that was an iPad pilot, I would have been lost without this website.

 

I am on Twitter @dcaphug and I use a PBWorks wiki for my class (mwahl145.pbworks.com). Feel free to use whatever you want.

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Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media

Indians take #AntiDowryPledge on social media | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Netizens use hashtag to raise awareness of thousands of deaths related to traditional custom.
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Pastafarians rejoice as Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is granted permission to register as a religion in Poland

Pastafarians rejoice as Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is granted permission to register as a religion in Poland | Human Geography | Scoop.it
A church that worships an invisible flying spaghetti monster can now apply to be registered as an official religion in Poland, after a 2013 court ruling was overturned on Tuesday.

Via Courtney Barrowman
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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 9, 4:09 PM

unit 3

Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 8:02 AM

Who says the news can't be fun!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 12:42 PM

I can't tell if this is real or satire. If it is real, there are people in Poland wasting court time with absolute silliness. What changes if they become an official religion? What happens to people that need to be Gluten-Free? Can they sue them for discrimination? Absolute insanity.

 

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon
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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.

 

Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.


Via Seth Dixon
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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 11:52 AM

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 9, 6:44 PM

Challenges the ideas about the impacts of declining birth rates across the world. Contains interesting graphs of changing Fertility rates from 1950 for the highest and lowest GDP nations. Relevant to Population Geography. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:18 PM

The dwindling birth rates may be seen as negative to some in a sense of power insecurities, but the reality is that it is great for economic growth and prevents population issues. With high birth rates, movement tends to be higher towards immigration while low birth rates mainly have movement towards urban spaces.

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Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes

Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes | Human Geography | Scoop.it
New York City has always been changing. But recently, the city has seen a wave of luxury condos and artisanal cupcake boutiques uproot local delis and dive bars.

To make sure we don't forget the city's past, two New York-based photographers, James...

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 30, 4:35 PM

A picture is worth a thousand words! Gentrification documented in photos

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:45 AM

unit 7

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 8:03 PM

APHG-U7

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 12:57 PM

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 9, 3:48 PM

unit 7

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Planet Money Makes A T-Shirt

Planet Money Makes A T-Shirt | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The world behind a simple shirt, in five chapters.
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These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever

These 22 Far Away Perspectives Of Famous Places Will Change The Way You See Them Forever | Human Geography | Scoop.it

AmaMany of us only know the world's most famous landmarks through images that show them in all their beautiful, historical glory. The world has changed since these structures were built, so the surrounding landscapes might not be what you'd expect. 


Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 23, 8:50 PM

Amazing from a different perspective

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

Photos that bear witness to modern slavery | Human Geography | Scoop.it
For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery. She shares hauntingly beautiful images -- miners in the Congo, brick layers in Nepal -- illuminating the plight of the 27 million souls enslaved worldwide. (Filmed at TEDxMaui)
Matthew Wahl's insight:

...an extremely powerful view of trafficing in the developing world.

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


Via Seth Dixon
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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 5:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 10:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 10:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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Political Geography Now: Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled

Political Geography Now: Lies Your World Map Told You: 5 Ways You're Being Misled | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Most world political maps aren't telling you the whole story. Learn about five ways your map is misleading you about borders, territories, and even the roster of the world's countries.
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Seth Dixon's comment, September 13, 2013 1:13 PM
Very nice find...I'll add that in a few months (if I remember!)
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 6, 2:35 PM

always always ask questions about your sources!

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | Human Geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

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How languages evolve - Alex Gendler

How languages evolve - Alex Gendler | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Over the course of human history, thousands of languages have developed from what was once a much smaller number. How did we end up with so many? And how do we keep track of them all? Alex Gendler explains how linguists group languages into language families, demonstrating how these linguistic trees give us crucial insights into the past.
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What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags

What U.S. History Would Have Been Like With Hashtags | Human Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 14, 3:41 PM

This collection isn't meant to be serious, but these images would get students to think about how historical events were played out and see the internal social and political dynamics in ways that they can relate to. 

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene | Human Geography | Scoop.it
84% of Americans are unable to locate Ukraine on a world map; those that can't are more likely to support military intervention.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 12:10 PM

As I've said before, a more informed, geo-literate citizenry helps to strengthen U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic efforts because they have a spatial framework within which to organize political, environmental, cultural and economic information.  National Geographic recently also produced a video showing how geo-education is important for business professionals as a part of their geo-education community (if you haven't already, join!).

David R. Perry's curator insight, April 7, 11:38 PM

Beyond sad.

Rach Brick's curator insight, April 13, 10:45 PM

This says so much about ignorance and aggression... Do they even know that they'd have to come up with a catchy name because the Crimea has already got a war names after it?

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


Via Seth Dixon
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European word translator

European word translator | Human Geography | Scoop.it
“Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map”
Via Seth Dixon
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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 7, 4:09 PM

APHUG, have fun with this!

 

#greski

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 10:43 AM

unit 3

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 27, 12:57 PM

I've conducted research in Mexico City, and am endlessly fascinated but this urban amalgamation.  The city is so extensive that there are numerous morphological patterns that can be seen in the city, including the 12 listed in the article.  


Tags: Mexico, density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 9, 3:48 PM

unit 7

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This map shows what the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

This map shows what the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | Human Geography | Scoop.it
In practical terms.

Via Nancy Watson
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 25, 6:51 PM

There are stated reasons and underlying reasons for political decision s. 

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:24 PM

Unit IV

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How just 6 cities dominate America's economy — in one astonishing chart

How just 6 cities dominate America's economy — in one astonishing chart | Human Geography | Scoop.it
These cities make up nearly a quarter of the entire U.S. economy

Via Nancy Watson
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How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps?

How Should Crimea Be Shown on National Geographic Maps? | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Friday's Russian parliamentary vote on annexation will determine the decision on the map of Crimea, says the Geographer of the National Geographic Society.

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Hitching A Ride On The World's Biggest Cargo Ship

Hitching A Ride On The World's Biggest Cargo Ship | Human Geography | Scoop.it
Launched in August, the Maersk McKinney Moller is the first of a new class of megaships. It's 20 stories high and a quarter-mile long. NPR's Jackie Northam hopped on board in Poland.
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Fiona Apple Sang "Pure Imagination" From "Willy Wonka" For A Chipotle Ad

Fiona Apple Sang "Pure Imagination" From "Willy Wonka" For A Chipotle Ad | Human Geography | Scoop.it
And it is so, so, so beautiful.
Matthew Wahl's insight:
Similar to the Back to the Start" commercial from Chipotle...ties into organic agriculture.
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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Human Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 1:18 PM

This video is a great audio supplement to these maps that display regional variations of vocabulary terms. 


Tags: language, North America, regions, USA.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 3:43 PM

This is an interesting video explaining words heard in different parts of the country. The video displays not only the cultural diversity of America but also how difficult it is to learn the English language. Although I was born and raised in Rhode Island most of the terms I am familiar with are the ones from the south (my dad's from Texas/California) and Massachusetts (my mom's from Fall River Mass). However, I have always used bubbler, but dandle board....really?

Anyways this video is pretty entertaining and informing. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 30, 2013 9:17 AM
This video is a very interesting way to see where a lot of our everyday vocabulary comes from. It gives us insight to the diversity in culture that America expresses. Now I can understand why it is so hard for many people to learn the English language, we have slang for everything, and a different slang word for each part of America. I am familiar with a lot of the terms, being a New England Native. Bubbler, wicked, soda, and cellar are some that are part of my everyday vocabulary (and unfortunately, being from Rhode Island sometimes the "R" seems to drop). It is amazing to see all the different words we have for just one thing and where they use them. It is just another great example of how widely diverse our country is.
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Superimposed Borders

Sir Archibald Mapsalot III solves regional tensions in the Middle East.

Via Seth Dixon, Mr. David Burton
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2013 2:00 PM

This entertaining, irreverent video clip highlights the fact that some of the political issues in the Middle East today are a legacy of colonialism.  During World War I, the French and the British secretly planned to carve up the Ottoman Empire, which was an ally of Germany. The current border of Syria is a legacy of that deal.  The would-be cartographers failed to understand the ethnic and religious complexity of that area; let’s not repeat history.  


Tags: borders, colonialism, SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, September 9, 2013 10:31 AM

What we think of as permanent countries were often created as part of the colonial past.  Boundaries were done for the benefit of the former colonizer not for the new country and this legacy still causes problems today.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:40 AM

Mapsalot.