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10 Barriers to Great Leadership

10 Barriers to Great Leadership | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Any growth process includes the inevitable stumbling blocks. Leadership growth is no different.

This blog post from Brian Evje on Inc.com showcases 10 barriers to great leadership. 

 

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen on: www.scoop.it/t/leadershipabc


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Patricia Kuhl: The linguistic genius of babies | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Patricia Kuhl shares astonishing findings about how babies learn one language over another -- by listening to the humans around them and "taking statistics" on the sounds they need to know.

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Neurons made from stem cells drive brain activity after transplantation in laboratory model

Neurons made from stem cells drive brain activity after transplantation in laboratory model | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

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10 Barriers to Great Leadership

10 Barriers to Great Leadership | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Any growth process includes the inevitable stumbling blocks. Leadership growth is no different.

This blog post from Brian Evje on Inc.com showcases 10 barriers to great leadership. 

 

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen on: www.scoop.it/t/leadershipabc


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Structure Your Presentation Like a Story

Structure Your Presentation Like a Story | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

The most effective presenters use the same techniques as great storytellers: By reminding people of the status quo and then revealing the path to a better way, they set up a conflict that needs to be resolved. 


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How President Obama Should Choose His Leadership Team

How President Obama Should Choose His Leadership Team | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Barack Obama is once again the president of the United States. The first thing he should do is pick his leadership team — carefully.

 


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8 Things Collaborative Leaders Know

8 Things Collaborative Leaders Know | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

 

Collaboration is not an option. Driven by the economic crisis and supported by the opportunities of Web 2.0, collaborative leaders know the future is in networked communities.

 


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Does it pay to know your type?

Does it pay to know your type? | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Some grandmothers pass down cameo necklaces. Katharine Cook Briggs passed down the world’s most widely used personality test. Chances are you’ve taken the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, or will. Roughly 2 million people a year do.
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's comment, December 15, 2012 5:07 AM
Great article from Washington Post's On Leadership about the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
Anne Egros's curator insight, December 15, 2012 10:48 AM

I am using another personality assessment for my coaching clients, it is called DISC and its based on the same principles than the Myers-Briggs test but with only 2 dimensions: Extrovert-Introvert and Task-People oriented, that gives 4 main types and variations inbetween.

 

The absolute results of the stest are not so important, what is useful is to bring awereness to people on their preferences and help them discover in real situations what make them  thrive or what situations are stressful.

 

People also get an idea on how to communicate with others taking into account their own communication styles and behavioral preferences.

 

I also find it is a good base to identify necessary behavioral changes to improve performance, self-comfidence or well-being.

Kate Richards's curator insight, May 7, 2013 2:31 AM

It's life changing knowing your personality type. You can begin to accept your weaknesses and know your strengths.

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Ray Kurzweil Joins Google In Full-Time Engineering Director Role; Will Focus On Machine Learning, Language Processing | TechCrunch

Ray Kurzweil Joins Google In Full-Time Engineering Director Role; Will Focus On Machine Learning, Language Processing  | TechCrunch | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Famed inventor, entrepreneur, and futurist Ray Kurzweil announced this afternoon that he has been hired by search engine giant Google as a director of engineering focused on machine learning and language processing.
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Amazon.com: Neural Networks for Vision, Speech, and Natural Language (9780442315795): R. Linggard, D. J. Myers, C. Nightingale: Books

Neural Networks for Vision, Speech, and Natural Language [R. Linggard, D. J. Myers, C. Nightingale] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers.
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Human Brain Is Wired for Harmony | Wired

Human Brain Is Wired for Harmony | Wired | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
"Since the days of the ancient Greeks, scientists have wondered why the ear prefers harmony. Now, scientists suggest that the reason may go deeper than an aversion to the way clashing notes abrade auditory nerves; instead, it may lie in the very structure of the ear and brain, which are designed to respond to the elegantly spaced structure of a harmonious sound. (...) If the chord is harmonic, or “consonant,” the notes are spaced neatly enough so that the individual fibers of the auditory nerve carry specific frequencies to the brain. By perceiving both the parts and the harmonious whole, the brain responds to what scientists call harmonicity. (...)

 

“Beating is the textbook explanation for why people don’t like dissonance, so our study is the first real evidence that goes against this assumption” (...)“It suggests that consonance rests on the perception of harmonicity, and that, when questioning the innate nature of these preferences, one should study harmonicity and not beating.” (...)

 

“Sensitivity to harmonicity is important in everyday life, not just in music,” he notes. For example, the ability to detect harmonic components of sound allows people to identify different vowel sounds, and to concentrate on one conversation in a noisy crowd."


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Researchers discover surprising complexities in the way the brain makes mental maps

Researchers discover surprising complexities in the way the brain makes mental maps | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Researchers discover surprising complexities in the way the brain makes mental maps
Spatial location is closely connected to the formation of new memories. Until now, grid cells were thought to be...

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Amira's curator insight, December 11, 2012 1:04 PM

"Spatial location is closely connected to the formation of new memories. Until now, grid cells were thought to be part of a single unified map system. New findings from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology demonstrate that the grid system is in fact composed of a number of independent grid maps, each with unique properties. Each map displays a particular resolution (mesh size), and responds independently to changes in the environment. A system of several distinct grid maps can support a large number of unique combinatorial codes used to associate new memories formed with specific spatial information. (...)

Your brain has at least four different senses of location – and perhaps as many as 10. And each is different. (...) This independence can be used by the brain to create new combinations - many combinations - which is a very useful tool for memory formation. (...)

What makes the discovery of the grid modules so special is that it completely changes our understanding of how the brain physically organizes abstract functions. Previously, researchers have shown that brain cells in sensory systems that are directly adjacent to each other tend to have the same response pattern. This is how they have been able to create detailed maps of which parts of the sensory brain do what.

The new research shows that a modular organization is also found in the highest parts of the cortex, far away from areas devoted to senses or motor outputs. But these maps are different in the sense that they overlap or infiltrate other. It is thus not possible to locate the different modules with a microscope, because the cells that work together are intermingled with other modules in the same area.

“The various components of the grid map are not organized side by side,”  “The various components overlap. This is the first time a brain function has been shown to be organized in this way at separate scales. We have uncovered a new way for neural network function to be distributed.” (...) The researchers were surprised, however, when they started calculating the difference between the scales. They may have discovered an ingenious mathematical coding system, along with a number, a constant. (Anyone who has read or seen “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” may enjoy this.) The scale for each sense of location is actually 42% larger than the previous one. “

We may not be able to say with certainty that we have found a mathematical constant for the way the brain calculates the scales for each sense of location, but it’s very funny that we have to multiply each measurement by 1.42 to get the next one. That is approximately equal to the square root of the number two.”

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Hijack! How Your Brain Blocks Performance

Hijack! How Your Brain Blocks Performance | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

Our brains do an amazing and wonderful job, but they don’t usually like change very much.

 

How can we rewrite our own programs to set the meaning and get the results we want? Further, as leaders, how can we assist others to get the results and experiences they would like? How can we use this knowledge to increase our own and our team’s performance, innovation, and engagement?

 

Blog post by Christine Comaford on Forbes. 


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Robin Martin's comment, November 25, 2012 9:34 AM
Awesome article! Thanks for sharing!
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Decidedly better choices

Decidedly better choices | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it

 

Efforts to understand how we can make decisions more effectively can lead to an improvement in outcomes, writes Philip Delves Broughton in Financial Times. 

 

How to improve your decision-making:

 

● The ability to make good decisions fluctuates throughout the day. Don’t exhaust yourself with small choices. Save your decision-making energy for what matters.

 

● Good process leads to good decisions. Consciously work to challenge the bases of decisions and the biases and prejudices of decision makers.

 

● Make decision-making a constant and flexible process. Keep a running list of several options for important decisions, discussing them with fellow managers and updating them with new discoveries. This lessens the drama of big decisions and allows for more course corrections en route.

 

● Seek ways to distance yourself from the emotion of decision-making. Going over the decision in a second language might sound a strange approach, but it has been shown to lead to more rational decisions.

 

 


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The Transformation of Leadership and Management

Traditional management has failed. In this TEDx talk Steve Denning explains in more detail why the transition to Management 2.0 is not merely desirable: it is inevitable.


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Neuroscience and Leadership

Neuroscience and Leadership | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
Regardless of disadvantageous experiences, especially in early life, individuals who truly want to develop their leadership capacity can do so through personal discipline and focused attention.
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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, December 12, 2012 12:06 PM

Interesting article... I have some smaller reserve though... the most importatnt is that as far as I know the left and right hemisphere is toda rather a metaphora than a physical reality (when one of them is hurt, the other more or less takes over without problem its functionality) but if we take it as it is - a strong metaphorb - the sens of the argunment is as good as it would be a physical reality...

Kasia Hein-Peters's curator insight, April 21, 2013 10:56 AM

Leaders are not born, they are coached.

Sue Rizzello's curator insight, December 18, 2013 11:01 PM

Learning, discipline and focus are part of earning a leadership position. Self perception as a leader is a fundamental part of building that perception in others. You communicate how you think in everything you say and do in interacting with the world.

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Does it pay to know your type?

Does it pay to know your type? | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
In this infographic, you'll get an overview of the 16 types to give a sense of how these bigger-than-life personalities fit in the Myers-Briggs philosophy. The official test is based on Carl Jung’s work in psychological typology.
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, December 16, 2012 3:05 AM

A follow up on my curated story yesterday. 

 
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Cuban Dog Dancing Salsa / Perrito Cubano Bailando Salsa

he gets all the cuban sandwiches he wants | | Music: La Excelencia - La Economía http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMO4CZ-Ssus Official Homepage: http://www.lae... (RT @DonReneRizcalla: Para que gocen su inicio de domingoCuban Dog Dancing Salsa / Perrito...
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Artificial Intelligence Knows When People Are Tweeting About You - Forbes

Artificial Intelligence Knows When People Are Tweeting About You - Forbes | Human Factors, Neuroscience & Cognitive Science | Scoop.it
ForbesArtificial Intelligence Knows When People Are Tweeting About YouForbesAmplify is an artificial intelligence operating with “supervised machine learning.” It bases its criteria for locating relevant conversations based on scores given to...
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