Hum Geo
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Hum Geo
For AP Human Geography Class
Curated by Sphs Jurgensen
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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | Hum Geo | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by Sphs Jurgensen from Geography Education
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Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010)

Animated U. S. Population Pyramid (1950-2010) | Hum Geo | Scoop.it

This is a simple, yet incredibly powerful graphic that helps to show the changing nature of population structure as a country moved to a different stage in the demographic transition (the link takes you to the animated version).  


Via Seth Dixon
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Raven Blair's curator insight, September 10, 2014 9:19 AM

This population pyramid of the United States in 1976 show that there were many younger people there are under 25. The largest percent of the people, by age separation, are around the age of 10-15, which could be a result of the Baby Boom in 1964. Eventually, our population pyramid may become upside-down because as the larger population groups move up the pyramid based on their age, they start to have less children, which means a smaller base. 

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Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving

Interactive Map: Where Americans Are Moving | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
More than 10 million Americans moved from one county to another during 2008. The map below visualizes those moves. Click on any county to see comings and goings: black lines indicate net inward movement, red lines net outward movement.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mark V's comment, August 27, 2012 11:15 AM
I thought this was interesting showing the flight from the northeast and midwest
Natalie K Jensen's curator insight, January 30, 2013 10:45 AM

This is a dynamic illustration of international migration in the US that fits nicely within Chapter 3.

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:51 PM

This map show the immigration and emigration of people in the United States. It gives you a visual representation of all the people moving in and out of an area. 

 

Something I noticed by looking at the map was that there are a huge amount of people leaving and moving in the major cities. Initially I thought that there would be a larger income than outcome in the big cities but the flow seemed pretty stable.