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Hum Geo
For AP Human Geography Class
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How Pandemics Spread

View Full Lesson on TED-ED BETA: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-pandemics-spread In our increasingly globalized world, a single infected person can board a pl...

 

This is a great demonstration of why spatial thinking is critical to so many fields, including medicine.

 

Tags: diffusion, medical, historical, spatial.


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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This video is about how a world wide pandemic can occur and has occurred in history. I thought this was interesting because it  spoke of many specific events like the black death and the 2010 cholera outbreak in haiti, gave detailed information, and was very informal.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows how pandemics and epidemics occur in a detailed way. It also shows how geography has related to epidemic outbreaks by showing disease spread maps and showing how doctors used this to solve the issue of it.

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Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


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Cam Morford's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:14 PM

Very interesting article and map regarding Mexican migration.  I'm not very familiar with Mexican states, provinces, or cities, but someone who is would find this article interesting.  It talks about each province in Mexico, how many people emigrate away from there, and where they immigrate to. 

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:51 PM

This relates o the topic that we are talking about in class because it has to do with migration. This topic is showing us how many people from Mexico come to the US especially more from Morelos. I didn't think that most Mexicans would come from that sate. That's what makes it interesting because I thought that more people would migrate to the US from other parts of Mexico. Like i know a lot of people from here in Longmont who are mostly from Durango and even from Guanajuato, from where i am from. My dad actually migrated from Mexico to the US and well basically i did too as well as my mom except for my sister. My dad wanted to Migrate here so that he could have a better job and life for him and us. It sucks how the number of migrants from Mexico have slowed down, because most of the undocumented people and just the ones who come from Mexico are helping the U.S with the population as well as the jobs around here. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 3, 4:09 PM

When it comes to ethnic groups in the United States, many of the hispanic/mexican ancestors occur in the southwestern area of the United States. That's obviously because Mexico is southwest of the United States. When it comes to emigrating from Mexico, individuals immigrate to the United States (mostly southwest of the United States) so they can live a different, hopefully better economy. Plus, they try to escape the gang violence and drug violence in Mexico.

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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article. 


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