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Hum Geo
For AP Human Geography Class
Curated by Sphs Jurgensen
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July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S.

July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S. | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
By Climate Central's Michael D. Lemonick: July 2012 was officially not only the warmest July on record, but also the warmest month ever recorded for the lower 48 states, according to a report released Wednesday by scientists at the National Oceanic...

 

The drought footprint cover 63% of the contiguous states during the hottest month in American history.  It's the hottest 12 month stretch (August 2011-July 2012) on record for the lower 48, making it the fourth consecutive month to set a new record (i.e. old record was July 2011-June 2012).The biggest difference from other hot months is the nighttime temperature have been exceptionally high.  The most current drought monitor map can be found at the University of Nebraske website. 


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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | Hum Geo | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 8:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  


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Kim Vignale's comment, July 9, 2012 7:33 PM
In the 1900s, there were more "natural" caused illnesses but not enough medicine or technology to alleviate these diseases, hence, the greater mortality rate. Presently, medicine and technology has changed for the greater good. Many of the diseases are cured and more people living longer due to this. However, mortality caused by heart disease and cancer have increased in 2010; this is probably due to higher calorie diets and exposure to preservatives and radiation.
Don Brown Jr's comment, July 10, 2012 4:17 PM
Looking back and comparing the 1900’s to 2010, I think it is becoming quite evident that our surrounding environment and what we consume impacts our health. Honestly what kind of cancer are you not at risk of getting today? Factors can vary from the genetically altered food we consume, radiation emitted from our cell phones or even prolonged exposure to the sun. While combating harmful pathogens and bacteria may have been a critical health concern and challenge of the early 20th century, finding remedies to an increasingly toxic environment may characterize the medical needs of the 21st century.
Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:50 AM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S.

Asians outnumber Hispanics among new immigrants to U.S. | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
As immigration levels from Mexico have plunged, the number of new arrivals from Asia has increased.

 

Don't listen to the election year rhetoric about immigration policies if you want to understand the shifting demographic profile of immigrants entering the United States.  For years now, immigration from Latin America has been at incredibly low levels mainly from 1) limited job market in the U.S. (weakening the pull factor), 2) increased deportation (weakening the pull factor) and 3) a sharp drop in Mexican birth rates (weakening the push factor).  What other push and pull factors are influences this change in the demographic profile of migrants?   Considering that Asian migrants are more highly educated that the rest of the American population (and Hispanics have less education than the general U.S. population), how will this change the labor market within the different sectors of the economy?


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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 9, 2012 8:46 AM
If you just listen to politicians you'd never get your facts straight. This here is a prime example of that. It can't hurt to have better educated immigrants, according to the statistics, but it may not be long before our citizens are crying out that the higher paying jobs are no longer in abundance. This could easily effect the demand for schooled and skilled job seekers, in an already damaged job market.
Brandon Murphy's comment, July 12, 2012 3:14 AM
It's not even just politicians that give you false data, media outlets such as FOX news would never reveal information like this. I agree Roland, there is absolutely nothing wrong with having a better educated immigrant population.
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Map of America’s Hispanic population

Map of America’s Hispanic population | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
In the race to the White House, no ethnic group is more prized than Hispanics. President Obama ended deportations for some young undocumented immigrants, and the Romney campaign is vetting Sen.

 

This interactive map feature combines to interesting variables (at the county level): the percentage of the total population that is Hispanic, and the 2008 presidential election.  Analyze your local area and a few counties as well.  What connection exists between the two variables?  How come?  What are some exceptions to these general patterns?


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Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers

Poverty In The U.S. By The Numbers | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
2010 Poverty Rate: 15.1%, 46.2 million people in poverty.

Here are the numbers behind the face of poverty in America.


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Immigrants Working In America

Immigrants Working In America | Hum Geo | Scoop.it
The U.S. is still a nation of immigrants: One in six U.S. workers was born somewhere else. Here's where America's immigrants come from, and what they do for work.

 

Of the American immigrant population, where were the workers born?  In what industries are they employed?  These are two straight-forward graphics with the answers to those questions.    


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Kate C's comment, July 8, 2012 4:29 PM
I found the second graphic, "Field of Employment by Place of Birth", interesting because of the relevantly even distribution of employment across the board. The Latin American born population seems the be the only one that deviates from the trend, with high percentages in Agricultural and Construction fields, and the lowest numbers in Education, Health Care, & Social Services. Interesting how students are included and I wonder how accurate the Census Bureau is at measuring specific employment information for undocumented immigrants.
Macy Nossaman's curator insight, September 20, 2013 11:26 AM

This is a good article about immigrants in America because it talks about all of the different places people have immigrated from and now live and work in the U.S. Since my topic is European Immigration, It shows that there are 2.4 million Europeans currently working in the U.S.

Laurel Stelter's comment, September 27, 2013 11:23 AM
I think that this is a really interesting article. The two pictures really help define America and its workplace well. It surprised me how many people weren't born in the U.S., but still work here.
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The Shifting Geography of Black America

The Shifting Geography of Black America | Hum Geo | Scoop.it

"While many northern cities did see anemic growth or even losses in black population, and many southern cities saw their black population surge, the real story actually extends well beyond the notion of a monolithic return to the South."

 

Demographics, culture, scale, region are some of the applications available. 


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