HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5
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HSIE Scoop.it assignment

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Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

Welcome to planet Earth and spherical objects!

 

For my HSIE assignment for EDUP3002, the stage that I had to focus on was Stage 1 and  my subject matter was: the globe as a representation of Earth.

The outcome that I chose that relates to the subject matter was:

ENS1.5 Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features. Albeit, I chose to look at this outcome, the resources I chose mainly focuses on the subject matter and how it relates to the outcome.

The inquiry question that I kept in mind throughout this assignment was: How can a spherical object like a globe represent the world?

 

Thank you for visiting and having a look at my Scoop.it and planet Earth!

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Mapping

Mapping | HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5 | Scoop.it
Find our interactive map, outline maps, satellite imagery, and information on how to interact with and create your own maps.
Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

This site is a resource for teachers to implement a unit based on a global perspective of countries and the global world. The resources provide various stimuli for students of maps and globes that differ from photographs to interactive games, which encourages students to utilise their ability to understand a variety of different multimodal texts (Winch, 2010). It provides the teacher with a diverse range of media and text types to utilise on the theme of globes, maps and seeing all the other countries in the world. Students will benefit from this resource albeit Australia being a multicultural country, the way they can view the globe and maps from a global perspective will be a valuable learning experience for students (Case, 1993). GeoGames, one of the games that the site provides, was purposely created by ‘Reach the World’, a global education and mentoring non-profit organisation.

 

The website provides many teaching ideas for teachers as the website provides lesson plans as well as other various resources. A fun and useful activity for students to participate in would be to play mapmaker interactive (found here: http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/mapping/interactive-map/?ar_a=1) as a class, and identify by clicking the left side bar what water looks like on an interactive globe and what land and mountains would look like as well. It allows students to develop their spatial concept of where land is relative to the ocean. This links to the outcome ENS1.5, where students are trying to learn to distinguish the difference between land and sea from a globe (Outcome ENS1.5 – HSIE). This mapmaker interactive resource allows students to further progress their understanding by exploring the impacts of environment related issues. A fun activity is to allow students to explore this interactive webpage and have students discuss one new knowledge they have learnt through this interactive.

 

An assessment task  task that would also be engaging would be to use GeoGames, (found: http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/media/geogames/?ar_a=1) where the student has to build planet earth using graphics and sound effects on an animated 3D globe. Students can participate in small groups and create a world globe from their own perspective, creating a mini globe and how they see land, water and other elements. Students will be assessed on their ability to distinguish between water and land. This can link to the creative arts syllabus (VAS1.1 – Creative arts), where students create their own globes and can colour code the water blue and land brown.

 

This resource is excellent as it explores some of the key values of global perspectives in HSIE - how the local is connected to the global perspective, perspectives of past, present and future, as well as values held across the globe (Pike & Selby, 1988 as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 371). Since the globe is already a global symbol, it is imperative that students be able to see the globe as a representation from both a local view and also a global perspective (Commonwealth of Australia 2008).

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

Board of Studies NSW (2014). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

Case, R. (1993). Key Elements of a Global Perspective. Social Education, V. 57(6), Pp. 318 – 325

Commonwealth of Australia (2008).Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation. Victoria. 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5 | Scoop.it
Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

The Indigenous language map is an excellent resource that is interactive which reveals the traditional owners of the land by stating the name of the tribe of every indigenous tribe in Australia. An evaluation of this resource highlights that there has been consultation with indigenous elders all around Australia and identifies the tribes (groups) and areas from which the Indigenous originate and resonate to the land. The map is visually appealing and interactive, which would make this resource useful for a Stage 1 class. While this map is a valued resource to demonstrate tribal groups, this map is from the perspective of the author and does not show the exact boundaries, thus, we must be careful choosing a source like this.

 

A teaching idea for this resource would be to show this to the students and have students discuss the different areas of tribes and how indigenous people traveled the land. It would be best to involve the Aboriginal community and have an elder from the local community come in and give students an insight to the traditional owners of their district. This is related to Gilbert & Hoepper’s (2011) idea that there is a need to seek the appropriate people to best present certain information (p. 392). Students could then be asked to identify on the map where there local tribe is by pointing to the map or using the magnifying glass to pinpoint the location (Outcome ENS1.5 - HSIE). To further deepen the lesson, this video from the same website: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-03-13/dual-naming-to-recognise-aboriginal-history/4571454 , where it shows the naming of places, roads and tourists signs in Tasmania to recognise Aboriginal history. It is a great video to show in conjunction with the map to align history of Australia and the Aboriginal relationship to the land.

 

To assess the students understanding and knowledge of their local tribes and how the map can be used to represent Australia and the different tribal groups around the land, the classroom teacher can ask the students to individually write an acknowledgement of their local tribe. This would be best utilised alongside the support from the local Aboriginal officer/community and it would give the opportunity to students in stage 1 to learn about their local tribe and whose land they currently study and live on. This links to literacy as they learn how to write an acknowledgement and a welcoming as part of speeches (Outcome link – ENS1-6B).

 

To further utilise the map as a classroom resource, looking at the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc., the teacher can look for posters such as the map to put up around the classroom in order for students to visually see every day. As Marsh (2010) suggests, a visual classroom with posters and art is beneficial as it provides multiple lenses for understanding.

 

References

NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc. (1977). http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/

 Board of Studies NSW (2014). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author  

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

Marsh, C. J. (2010). Becoming a teacher: Knowledge, skills and issues. Pearson Australia.

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One World. Many Stories.

One World. Many Stories. | HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5 | Scoop.it
Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

Stratologica is an excellent resource that teachers can utilise and implement into their classrooms in order to better teach students about the globe and how it can represent different parts of the world. As the article by Ozsoy (2012) suggests that the globe is quite a complex scientific process and many misconceptions may arise if not addressed early. The Stratologica program incorporates the interactive whiteboard and allows the teacher to use as a tool to allow children to see all around the world and their local community from many different views. This may include views from space, map like view and even bird’s eye point of view. It uses Google Earth as a plugin and the interactive whiteboard to provide teacher’s with the tools to be able to teach a practical lesson.

 

Teaching ideas: The Stratologica program used alongside with Google Earth would be best used to plan a hands on lesson revolving around teaching students about the Earth as a spherical shape in order to explain why we use a globe to represent our Earth. A teaching idea would be to brain-storm with students to determine their understanding on planet Earth followed by asking students to create their own model of the globe in an art type lesson (Outcome link - VAS1.1). By doing this type of lesson, and allow students to create a 3-dimensional model of the globe, it introduces students to the concept that the Earth is not hollow, which is an easy misconception (Ozsoy, 2012). By comparing their model with the stratologica examples, students would be able to have a better understanding of this concept. As suggested in the article by Ozsoy (2012), a great way to test the student’s understanding would be through discussion. Being able to utilise a program like Stratologica on the interactive whiteboard, would allow the teacher to gauge the student’s understanding and direct further learning.

 

This resource would be a great student resource and beneficial for the teacher to use in various classroom situations. Along with the article by Ozsoy (2012), which emphasises the importance on teaching students struggling to understand the concept of a round earth. Being a digital interactive resource, the teacher is able to implement this resource which will be seen as fun and engaging to students. By structuring lessons around building on student’s misconceptions, the teacher will be able to structure future learning using this resource to align student with current knowledge on the topic. Thus, a quality learning experience is created, and as Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) states, it is what we need to be trying to achieve to.

 

References

Board of Studies, NSW. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

Ozsoy, (2012) Is the Earth Flat or Round? Primary School Children’s Understandings of the Planet Earth: The Case of Turkish Children

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Learning Ideas - Grades K-8: Fun Geography for Kids with Maps and Globes

Learning Ideas - Grades K-8: Fun Geography for Kids with Maps and Globes | HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5 | Scoop.it
Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

There’s a map on my lap is a book by Dr Seuss is an exceptional book that allows young children to be introduced to the concept of maps and how to read and understand them. This book can be used in a Stage 1 class as a way of introducing students to the new topic. As a stimulus, this picture book can be used to teach students on how to read maps. By reading aloud and allowing children to ask structured questions about the text during and after reading, the teacher can engage the students into literal, inferential and critical thinking (Hill 2006 in Winch 2010). As Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) infers, resources that allows students to infer and allow critical thinking are the great learning activities.

 

Teaching idea/Assessment: This book would act as a stimulus and introductory lesson into teaching students about maps and how we use it. Thus, this falls under literacy, where maps can be seen as a visual text and introducing students to the concept that texts are made for a variety of reasons (EN1-6B). After the reading and viewing of the book, ask the students to draw and create their own maps of possibly the classroom, or the playground or even their own rooms. Show students a variety of example maps from the aforementioned resource on National geographic society to give students a visual representation. http://education.nationalgeographic.com/education/maps/maps-and-models/?ar_a=1

 

As Gilbert & Hoepper (2011) suggests, the best type forms of assessments are the ones that allow students to demonstrate what they know and what they can do. Thus, a book such as There’s a map on my lap by Dr Seuss which is written in an age appropriate catchy rhyme style, allow students to join in and be active participants in learning. Also, what may work well in a contemporary society is the ideology of multiliteracies as suggested by Winch et. al (2010), the notion of viewing the book online. This may work well by viewing the YouTube reading of the book found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NazvXwWumaQ Giving students various opportunities to use a variety of multimodal media to view the text will help develop their understanding from a different context is a major aspect of multiliteracies (Winch, 2010). Thus, by continuing the with the map-making activity aforementioned, it will provide students the opportunity to demonstrate an appropriate assessment of learning in an informal way that allows feedback on learning.s

 

Reference

Board of Studies NSW (2014). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children's literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Mapping Our World | Oxfam Education

Mapping Our World | Oxfam Education | HSIE: Stage 1 - the globe - ENS1.5 | Scoop.it
This unique interactive website works with maps and globes to transform pupils' understanding of the world. Winner of a Geographical Association Gold award and a BAFTA award for primary learning, Mapping Our World allows pupils to flatten
Nathan Kit Chong's insight:

This site is an interactive unit of work that takes on a global perspective, which classroom teachers could use to implement and teach in their own classrooms. It is a fantastic, fun and interactive starting point when designing and developing a HSIE unit, which is focused on teaching Stage 1 students about globes and maps. The site provides a framework for a learning sequence and well-structured lesson sequence that is designed along with interactive games and animations to assist. It also includes links to the curriculum and other resources that could be used to assist.

 

Teaching ideas: This teaching resource is full of fun teaching ideas that incorporate animations and links literacy into HSIE. It involves reading information, making meaning and decoding of information whilst the students are interacting and playing games on the interactive whiteboard or computer. This is a great link to literacy that could incorporate reading and recognising different texts (Outcome link EN1-8B). It could be a great resource to use at the end of a teaching sequence to allow students to test their knowledge and also to consolidate the information they have recently learnt. Students can then note the similarities and differences between land and the sea by looking at a globe and noting the differences (Outcome ENS1.5 – HSIE).

 

An idea for an assessment could include printing out the printer friendly version of the multiple choice questions and various other forms of assessments available through the Oxfam interactive globe page. This would best be completed after all the students have had a go on the interactive game, to give the students an opportunity to be involved. The teacher could then use this as a summative assessment. As stated by Crisp (2012), a summative assessment at the end of student learning may allow us to evaluate how well the students understand and thus leads teachers into thinking about how to consolidate and retain this knowledge for the future.

 

This resource is exceptional as the learning strategies suggested allows students to develop inquiry process based learning, which is the base foundation of learning about HSIE (Board of Studies 2007). As suggested by Gilbert & Hoepper (2011), resources that allow great learning activities lead to critical and reflective thinking. This resource allows students to formulate their own conclusions and through a range of interactive stimuli’s, students are able to reflect on what they have learnt (NSW Department of Education and Training 2008). 

 

REFERENCES

Board of Studies NSW (2014). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author  

Crisp, G. T. (2012). Integrative assessment: reframing assessment practice for current and future learning. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, v. 37(1), Pp. 33 - 43.

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

NSW Department of Education and Training (2008). Quality teaching in NSW public schools: Discussion paper Sydney: Author

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