HSIE Teaching resources Stage 1
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HSIE Teaching resources Stage 1
Resources for teaching CUS1.3 - Identifies customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families. (Similarities and differences between ways in which families express their culture, e.g. celebrations)
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Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices

Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices | HSIE Teaching resources Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Ancient Stories, New Voices. Dust Echoes is a series of twelve animated dreamtime stories from Central Arnhem Land in Northern Australia
Luke Zorzetti's insight:

Dust echoes is an excellent resource of videos which reveal aspects of family life and themes and celebrations which are important to respective indigenous tribes throughout Australia. A suitable evaluation of the resource shows that it is a recent resource made in consultation with indigenous elders and identifies the groups and areas from which the stories originate. Furthermore it has been endorsed and developed with the Djilpin Arts Aboriginal Corporation in Arnhem Land. As told by indigenous elders, the material provides a balanced view of indigenous Australians without a hidden curriculum or bias or using photographs of deceased people in the content. However, this resource exclusively discusses Aboriginal values and family traditions, and as such Torres Strait Islanders should be addressed separately by another resource list. While the resource depicts rituals and dances, they are not of a sacred/secretive nature (Government of South Australia Aboriginal Education and Employment Services, 2012).

 

A teaching idea for this resource could be to show students “The Be” video and discuss different concepts of family and how indigenous peoples celebrate their relationship with the land and country. It would be best to involve the aboriginal community, or seek advice from the appropriate peoples the story originates from as to the best manner to present this information (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 392). Students could then discuss what their family celebrates, and why this may be different to Aboriginal celebrations and cultural beliefs. Students then note similarities and differences to their own family’s practices and present the information to the class (Outcome CUS1.3 – HSIE).

 

A good idea for assessment could include asking students to think pair share about important people in their family. After allowing students to explore the video resources, ask students to write who/what might be central to an indigenous person’s ‘family’ and why (Links to WS1.9 – English/Literacy).

 

Literacy links could involve developing vocabulary from indigenous perspectives such as the “corroborre”, or “elder” as a class, and asking students to use these words to tell the story of one of the videos of their choosing. It is important to ask students to share these, as teachers will need to stress the difference and complexities of indigenous identity for the students to ensure not to trivialise these ideas (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 393).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

 

Government of South Australia Aboriginal Education and Employment Services. (2012). The Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Retrieved 21 April from SA Aboriginal Education Website

http://www.aboriginaleducation.sa.edu.au/files/links/selection_20criteria.pdf

 

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Who are the families of the world | Global Education

Who are the families of the world | Global Education | HSIE Teaching resources Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Luke Zorzetti's insight:

This site is a resource for teachers to implement a unit based on a global perspective of families. The resource provides stimuli for students of families who live around the globe including living areas, foods, daily life and celebrations. Students will benefit from this resource as though Australia is a very multicultural country, the traditions, values and symbols which remain over a global perspective will be a valuable learning experience for students.

 

The website provides many teaching ideas for teachers. A strong activity for students to participate in would be to collect items which are used in celebrations into a large bag which students pass around and draw out an item. Students are then asked to talk about the item (Have they seen it before? What is it used for? Is it important? To whom?)

 

An assessment task which would also be engaging would be to create a new “celebration” as a classroom family. Students participate in small groups and create a “mini project” creating a symbol over a week in class using classroom materials which is significant to the new classroom family “Celebration”. Students will be assessed on their ability to create a symbol of significance and how they link that item to the classroom family values/customs (Linked to Outcome VAS1.1 – Creative Arts)

 

A strong link to literacy (Outcome TS1.1 – English) would be to get students to do a minute role-play and re-enact a family celebration depicted in one of the photos from the site: Who are the families of the world. Students critique the role-plays and explore the differences between their interpretation and those expressed through the image series.

 

This resource is excellent as it explores some of the key values which underpin global perspectives in HSIE – (how the local is connected to the global perspective, perspectives of past, present and future, as well as values held across the globe) (Pike & Selby, 1988 as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 371). Furthermore it addresses multiple global perspectives, providing students with a glimpse as to the complexity of cultures and families around the globe, as well as providing opportunities to foster positive attitudes to different identities, and diversity around the globe (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008).

 

References

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Commonwealth of Australia (2008).Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation. Victoria.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

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Chinese New Year Highlights video

Relive the highlights from the Year of the Ox celebrations from the launch event and the action-packed dragon boat races to the spectacular colour, lights an...
Luke Zorzetti's insight:

This video resource could be shown to Stage 1 students to showcase the differences and even similarities that Chinese culture may have to their own, with regard to traditions, symbolism and celebrations in Sydney (Outcome CUS 1.3 - HSIE).

 

A teaching idea could be to show the students the video as a stimulus and then discuss their own cultures – specifically celebrations, traditions or dances. Students could then create a ‘dance’ working cooperatively in groups of 3-4, each group member bringing at least one dance step inspired by a their own culture or from the stimulus. As a class, merge group dances together to make a multicultural dance, and present at the school fate/celebration. Students working as a group can allow greater capacity for reflection and overall learning through explanatory talk (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011 p. 145). This teaching idea can be linked to numeracy, as well as creative arts through expression of tempo, rhythm and “counts” of the dance (Outcome NS1.3 – Mathematics)

 

To assess student understanding and appreciation of difference in customs and celebrations while incorporating literacy into HSIE – a classroom teacher could ask students to individually write a story from their perspective as to the significance and symbolism of their dance (Outcome WS1.9 – English). Teachers should bear in mind Assessment for Learning principles: focus on assessing a positive attitude of understanding and appreciation rather than superficial recall of facts related to the culture. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.125). An alternative means of assessment would be to formatively assess student’s participation in the teaching idea, noting engagement, reflection and attitudes to the task.

 

In addition to using the resource, teachers could support it by providing alternate means of accessing the content or ideas behind it. An example could be bringing in a member of the Chinese community to help explain traditions behind it, or an excursion to a celebratory event of a similar nature. Research suggests that multimodal content delivery positively affects student’s achievement of learning outcomes (Winch et al., 2006)

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. Victoria: Cengage Learning

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2006). Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (third edition). Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Celebrations

Luke Zorzetti's insight:

This site is a unit of work which classroom teachers could implement and teach in their own classrooms. It is a fantastic starting point when designing a HSIE unit which is focused on teaching celebrations and traditions to Stage 1 students. The site provides a framework for a suggested learning sequence, as well as recommendations for resource usage to assist.

 

A teaching idea: This teacher’s resource is loaded with teaching ideas though an excellent teaching idea which incorporates literacy into HSIE really well involves reading information and creating a jointly constructed information report (Rowe & Jackson, 2001). The benefits of joint construction have been outlined by Batham (2012, p. 14-17) suggesting that throughout joint construction discussion of appropriate content and decisions about content were made naturally and in a positive way, rather than allowing students to form ill guided perspectives on family celebrations. After creating an information report as a class students construct a more focused information report on a celebration of their choosing in groups jointly.

 

A literacy link could include talking and listening (Outcome link TS1.1 – English) where the teacher could also create an assessment task for student’s understanding of families and celebrations which are typical of the multicultural Australian population. Students would play the game “Hot Seat” and asked a variety of questions by the teacher and/or their classmates and would have to answer from the perspective of a person who had just come from a specific celebration (e.g. birthday, Anzac day, Greek/Italian street festivals). Students would then be assessed on the credibility as well as the attitude presented of the celebration they had just supposedly come from.

 

This resource is exceptional as the learning strategies suggested lead to inquiry process based learning, which is a fundamental cornerstone of learning about HSIE by organising, synthesising and applying new information to the learning process (Board of Studies, 2007, p. 12). Furthermore excellent learning activities often encourage critical and reflective thinking (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011) and this teaching resource has enough depth to encourage students to form their own conclusion from a range of stimuli and activities, allowing them to reflect on various components significance for themselves (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008).

 

References

 

Batham, J. (2012). Classroom Blogs and addressing the general capabilities of the Australian Curriculum. Quick 120 (1), 14-17.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Board of Studies NSW (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author

 

NSW Department of Education and Training (2008). Quality teaching in NSW public schools: Discussion paper Sydney: Author

 

Rowe, E., Jackson, J. (2001). Celebrations – Teacher Librarians Integrated Unit Worksample. Sydney: Board of Studies Retrieved April 20, 2013 from Board of studies K-6 Integrated Units website http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/TeacherLibrarians/librarians_celebrate.html

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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | HSIE Teaching resources Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Luke Zorzetti's insight:

The Difference Differently Communities module is an excellent resource for students to use to learn about families, and groups and “special days” or celebrations of those groups and families. By instilling a sense of belonging to a group through the site, it allows students to begin to reflect on similarities and differences between their own families and others belonging to different groups.

 

A teaching idea could involve creating a video in conjunction with the difference differently website, where students are placed into groups of 5-6, and create a short film (2 minutes) about a special day which the class plans to go to. Student’s would need to know the basics behind film (Outcome link – VAS1.1 – Creative Arts), in order to produce a coherent film, but student’s engagement with the task would be high as so many students connect with visual texts over written text and at a higher cognitive level (Callow, 2012,p.77-79).

 

An assessment idea could involve the group presenting their film to the rest of the stage group (Stage 1) at an assembly and answering questions such as: Do we dress a certain way? – Why?, Family involvement – Before/After the celebration – how do you prepare for the celebration?. Students answer together as a group, and are expected to compliment and build on each other’s answers to provide a coherent and thoughtful answer which addresses criteria previously established.

 

A numeracy activity using the “Special Day” section of the site as a stimulus could involve creating a calendar as a class of the year of “Special Days” that students and their families celebrate. For example – student’s birthdays, religious celebrations (Easter, Ramadan, and Hanukkah) and special times around the world (e.g. Chinese New Year, Thanksgiving) amongst others (Outcome link – MS1.5 – Mathematics).

 

I have chosen this resource as Quality teaching framework (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2008) suggests that making resources more personalised, or something that the students can relate to can assist student understanding and promote intellectual quality and significance for the students about what they are learning. This site takes Australian children from a range of backgrounds and tells their stories from a child’s perspective, which students can relate to making it an effective resource which students will be able to access.

 

References

 

Board of Studies, NSW. (2006). Creative Arts K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author 

 

Callow, J. (2012). The rules of visual engagement: Images as tools for learning. Screen Education, 65, 72-79.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training (2008). Quality teaching in NSW public schools: Discussion paper Sydney: Author

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