HSIE Stage 3 Environments
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HSIE Stage 3 Environments
Exploring the physical, political and cultural regions and main reference points in Australia and the world.
Curated by Jade Quayle
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Google Maps.

Google Maps. | HSIE Stage 3 Environments | Scoop.it
Jade Quayle's insight:

Google Maps is a free online mapping technology that provides high-resolution aerial or satellite images for most urban areas all over the world. Though not explicitly educational, Google Maps' is a highly accessible visual tool that can empower teachers and students to understand the physical and political regions of the world. It allows teachers and students to move around the map manually, search for main reference points, and zoom in and out of these reference points for a rounded understanding. It could be incorporated into lesson plans through the use of the Interactive white board (IWB), on the class desktop or on individual iPads/ laptops/ desktops (depending on the classroom’s resources). Because of its easy accessibility and operation it could be used both as a collaborative and individual tool for discussion or research for almost any target age, so long as the terminology is discussed prior to its use. As such, Google maps would be perfect as part of a presentation assessment: where the student would refer to the satellite image as a reference point during their discussion of a specific region.

 

Better yet, “besides using Google Maps to teach the fundamentals of mapping … you can inspire students to investigate the world and to think spatially” (Google). These high order thinking skills are deep-seated in the production of independent learners. Where even the National Research Council state that “spatial thinking must be recognized as a fundamental part of K–12 education and as an integrator and a facilitator for problem solving across the curriculum” (2006, p.318).

 

Bibliography:

National Research Council. (2006). Learning to think spatially: GIS as a support system in the k-12 curriculum, Washington: The National Academic Press.

 

Google (2012). Google Maps: Education. Retrieved April 2, 2013 from http://maps.google.com/help/maps/education/learn/index.html

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Integrating music into a lesson.

Yakko's Nations of the World from the Animaniacs in HQ

Jade Quayle's insight:

In this youtube clip; Yakko, a loveable dog-like cartoon character, lists the nations of the world to the tune of the Mexican hat dance. While the listing of the nations has obvious educational value, the main appeal of this clip is the manner in which it is presented: through animated song. This has particularly important implications for education as “rhythm and rhyme … increase learning, and singing frequently provides an emotional hook that can engage students in learning routine facts. By adding rhythm, music, and movement to a learning experience, we send messages to the brain through various pathways and create a richer learning experience” (McIntire, 2007, p.46). So for facts that would otherwise be seemingly overwhelming (all the political regions of the world), the combination of rhyme and rhythm may engage students in the content and motivate them to learn more. As much as this resource may facilitate classroom engagement, though, it does not appear to be in any kind of order (apart from that which makes in rhyme). So for a student that may be unknowledgeable in this area, learning from this youtube clip may be counterproductive. As such, the use of this clip as an educational tool would need to be closely guided by explaining the clip’s demise and setting classroom tasks to rectify any confusion. Such tasks could include, but are not limited to, asking the students to write their own version of the song and delegate roles to present it in front of the class. For our stage 3 students, we may then extend this into a film studies class: asking them to film each other performing the song and editing it to make their own video.

 

Bibliography:

McIntire, J. M. (2007). Developing Literacy through Music. Teaching Music, 15, 44-48.

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Global perspective- Asia.

China Down Under - teacher's resource.

Jade Quayle's insight:

'China Down-under' is a multistage HSIE teaching resource that has been produced by the NSW Government Education and Training to promote student’s understanding of our relationship with Asia (Gantner, 2003). This curriculum support document provides significant support for teaching and learning in Stages 1, 2 and 3; and provides teachers with rich and engaging lesson plans for HSIE with a global perspective. It includes detailed teaching notes, handouts and background information specific to each stage; but what becomes particularly relevant to the subject matter I am exploring are pages 92-99; where teachers are provided with teaching/ learning activities for stage 3 in the area of ‘mapping’. Such activities include, but are not limited to, asking students to: locate china on a globe and/ or map, identify countries that share borders with China, identify natural features of the country and locate the provinces within China. Then, “when students are familiar with the shape of China provide opportunities for students to draw free- hand maps of the country, making in some natural features and labeling capital and major cities”. To assess this learning, the document then suggests that students should be given the opportunity to, “either independently or in pairs, create a “China at a glance” fact file. Headings could include population (country/ cities), capital city, major cities, area, longest river, highest mountain, country name, significant built sites, climate, length of coastline, seas, time information and largest desert. An Australia at a Glance fact file could be created alongside the china fact file and students could compare features of both countries”.

 

Bibliography:

Gantner, C. (2003). Opening Address. National Summit: Studies of Asia in Australian.

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Accompanying classroom resources with the online.

Accompanying classroom resources with the online. | HSIE Stage 3 Environments | Scoop.it

National Geographic- Kid's world.

Jade Quayle's insight:

‘National Geographic- kid’s world’ is an online accompaniment to the National Geographic Atlas, which targets its younger readers. In the ‘maps’ section of this site, users are provided with simple links to various map applications and interactive map games. As such, it makes both collaborative and individual use in a classroom and at home possible. For collaborative use, a teacher may display a map on an Interactive White Board (IWB) and open a discussion forum for his/her students asking them to reveal any knowledge they may already have and expanding on it. The teacher could then distribute black and white outline maps (printed from the site) for groups of students to label according to either physical, political or cultural regions (each group would be assigned one to concentrate on). Once gaining that specialist knowledge, the students could then report their knowledge back to the class by presenting their now completed map. The advantages of working in a collaborative manner like this are extensive: where “teammates complement and build on each others' views in an attempt to construct shared knowledge and understandings. According to Driscoll (2005), effective collaboration enables insights and solutions to arise synergistically in a rigorous process that involves the development and evaluation of diverse arguments” (Ioannou & Artino, 2010, p189). If we want our students to become life-long learners, though, we also need to support independent learning (Kolcaba, 1980). So, for individual use, the students could participate in an ‘atlas puzzle’ on the site. Not only will this give children the opportunity to attempt it on their own, it will also give us, as teachers, the opportunity to really assess their understanding.

 

Bibliography:

Kolcaba, R. F. (1980) Independent Learning Skills: Keys to Lifelong Education, Curriculum review, 18, 15-19.

 

Ioannou, A. & Artino, A. (2010). Learn more, stress less: exploring the benefits of collaborative assessment, College Student Journal, 44, 189.

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Indigenous perspective.

Indigenous perspective. | HSIE Stage 3 Environments | Scoop.it

Interactive Map of Indigenous groupings within Australia.

Jade Quayle's insight:

The interactive map on this website indicates the general location of larger groupings of Indigenous people within Australia. While it is “just one representation of other map sources that are available” for this topic; it represents research carried out for the Encyclopedia of Aboriginal Australia (Horton, 1994) so it is grounded in reliable academic research.

 

Now because it is a direct link to the interactive map it is easily accessible to teachers and students. As such, it could be used both in the collaborative and individual sense; where the use of an Interactive white board (IWB), the class desktop or individual iPads/ laptops could facilitate the learning of aboriginal regions within Australia. A teacher could then extend this learning by asking his/ her students to pick a group of indigenous people and complete research on them; with an emphasis on the cultural region in which they originated. This task, while adhering to the original subject matter I was assigned, also embeds itself in the outcome “CUS2.4: Places of religious and spiritual significance in the local community, including the special relationship of Aboriginal people to the land” (Board of studies, 2007). So if a teacher were to incorporate this assessment idea into their work, he/ she would be successfully embedding indigenous perspectives on the individual level (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.388).

 

Bibliography:

Board of studies. (2007). Human Society and it’s Environment Syllabus. NSW.

 

Horton, D. (1994). ‘The Encyclopedia of Aboriginal Australia’, Aboriginal Studies Press.

 

Stevens, V. & McDonald, H. ‘Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in SOSE’ in Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (Eds.). (2011) Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 385-402), Melbourne: Cengage Learning.

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