Family Culture: A reason to celebrate!
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Families of the World

Families of the World | Family Culture: A reason to celebrate! | Scoop.it
Catherine Loyola's insight:

‘Families of the World’ is another great educational tool that incorporates a Global Perspective in promoting an understanding about similarities and differences of cultural expression. There are approximately 30 different short-clips (filmed from a child's perspective) that depict the family lifestyle in different countries around the world. Whilst the videos are narrated in English, they are all filmed overseas so allow children to gain a visual awareness as to how families express their cultures differently, including exposure to things such as food, clothing and language.

 

As per the Melbourne Declaration of Educational Goals for Young Children (MCEETYA, 2008, p.4), “Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in the past decade”, thus, “This heightens the need to nurture…a sense of global citizenship”. Meanwhile, one Cross-Curriculum Priority is ‘Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia, whereby teachers should “ensure students learn about and recognise the diversity within and between the countries of the Asia region” (ACARA, 2012, p. 18). With this priority in mind, the chosen videos for reflection could potentially be China or India, or one of our closer neighbours like the Philippines or Thailand.

 

A form of assessment in conjunction with ‘Families of the World’ therefore may be a project that involves students creating their own videos of their families with respect to culture. The video could be question-based, some examples being “What kind of food do we eat at home?”, “What kind of clothes do we wear at home?”, “What do we celebrate at home?” and where appropriate, “What language or languages do we speak at home?” and “What customs or religious practices do we follow at home?” Such an assignment would also incorporate the General Capability ‘Information and Communications Technology’ (ACARA, 2013). Furthermore, it correlates with the Global Perspectives framework for teaching Identity and Cultural Diversity that suggests primary students “Investigate similarities and differences in beliefs and culture of people in Australian and around the world through family histories” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008).

 

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) (2012). The Shape of the Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/The_Shape_of_the_Australian_Curriculum_v4.pdf

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) (2013). General Capabilities in the Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/GeneralCapabilities/General%20capabilities.pdf

 

Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspective: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Retrieved from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/global-education.edu.au/gobal-education/what-is-global-ed.html

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA). 2008. Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. MCEETYA, Carlton South.


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Diversicare 2014 Multicultural Calendar

Diversicare 2014 Multicultural Calendar | Family Culture: A reason to celebrate! | Scoop.it
Diversicare 2014 Multicultural Calendar | Caring for People
Catherine Loyola's insight:

The Diversicare Multicultural Calendar is useful in understanding the diverse ways that families express their culture. It is presented in a colourful manner with photographs and stories of people from a broad range of multicultural backgrounds to make it more appealing and useful for an educational purpose. The observed days of importance marked by the calendar are those that are recognised in a variety of religions including Christianity, Islam, Buddhism and Judaism amongst others. Also recognised are important days for other nations across Asia, the Americas, Europe, Africa and other countries.

 

The use of the Multicultural Calendar in a HSIE setting focused on cultures is in line with incorporating a Global Perspective (MCEETYA, 2008). Meanwhile, by using the calendar, children are also developing numeracy skills in recognising numbers and place value (dates). Bobis, Mulligan and Lowrie (2013) encourage the use of numerical representation in general and make use of devices containing numbers in real-life situations including calendars.

 

A recommendation by the Board of Studies (2007) is to utilise a retrieval chart when studying Celebrations with Stage 1. For example, some headings for the chart could include ‘Type of celebration’, ‘When’, ‘Music’, ‘Food’ and ‘Clothes’. The teacher can therefore choose an event from the calendar and by using the retrieval chart allow children to discover some of the cultural elements of a celebration. Another retrieval chart can then be used individually for a celebration special to their own families, which can later be shared to the wider group.

 

References:

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically (4th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Education.


Board of Studies NSW. (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Units of Work. Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved from https://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/6693a650-2dcd-4ea9-8409-dded3daadad7/k6hsie_stg1_unitsofwork.pdf?MOD=AJPERES


Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA). 2008. Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. MCEETYA, Carlton South.


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"Today We Have No Plans"

"Today We Have No Plans" | Family Culture: A reason to celebrate! | Scoop.it
Read a sample or download Today We Have No Plans by Jane Godwin & Anna Walker with iBooks.
Catherine Loyola's insight:

 

"Today We Have No Plans" by Jane Goodwin and Anna Walker is beautifully written and illustrated. It is a fantastic resource for Stage 1 and is available as a traditional story book or as an e-book (It could also be a way of introducing the concept of electronic reading to children). The story depicts the busy lifestyle of a family through narrative rhyme and colourful pictures, encompassing a variety of activities that make up the weekly routine for many Australian families. These include organising school lunches, kids being dropped off to school, parents having to rush off to work, after-school care, music lessons, swimming lessons and grocery shopping to name a few. Finally Sunday comes and it is a day for the family to relax, the day that the children like best.

 

The story can be read as a class together with some ‘before reading’ processes followed such as prediction, setting the scene and brainstorming (Education Department of WA, 1994). Reading aloud to children is known to help improve literacy skills in reading, talking and listening, however it is important for there to be structure, which not only involves processes before reading but after, including discussion (Spence, 2004). Children can be prompted to engage in discussion through questions such as, ‘What things does your family do that are the same or similar to those described in the book?”. Alternatively, “What things does your family do that are different?”.

 

An activity for children could be to make a list of similarities and differences between their own families and the family depicted in the book. Through this activity children will help children develop their graphological, phonological and semantic knowledge (NSW DET, 1997) with respect to the English Syllabus.

 

References:

Education Department of WA (1994). First steps teaching strategies using Narrative texts. in Reading resource book. pp. 50-71.

 

NSW DET. (1997) Literacy Teaching Reading: A K-6 Framework. NSW DET Sydney: Curriculum Directorate.

 

Spence, B. (2004). Reading aloud to children Pen 146. Newtown: PETAA.

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A Shared History - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6

A Shared History - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 | Family Culture: A reason to celebrate! | Scoop.it
Catherine Loyola's insight:

‘A Shared History’ is undoubtedly a valuable resource in incorporating an Aboriginal perspective in HSIE, having been designed for this purpose by the NSW Department of Education and Training. It is in line with other documentation that aids Indigenous teaching, such as The Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide (NSW DET, 2003), which recognises key concepts such as the recognition of contemporary Aboriginal input, diversity of Aboriginal cultures and sensitivity of sacred material. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) histories and cultures are a Cross-curriculum Priority, and as highlighted in the mentioned title, ATSI histories play a key role in the history shared by all Australians (ACARA, 2013).

 

Whilst ‘A Shared History’ contains specific examples of classroom activities (such as creating a family tree based on photos of an Aboriginal family), it is also useful as a framework for the incorporation of an Aboriginal perspective in general. Some guidelines include having Aboriginal viewpoints on events and issues, recognising and affirming Aboriginal identity and cultures and maintaining curriculum and cultural integrity.

 

This resource further advocates the need for teachers to be aware of the key issues about Aboriginality and the Land as well as the importance of including Aboriginal Communities in education. This is echoed by Gilbert and Hoepper (2014, p. 352) who claim “a full and unbiased understanding of [Aboriginal]  cultures can only be gained through genuine contact with Indigenous people themselves”. With regard to this, the Board of Studies (2008, p. 2) provides insightful details to guide teachers and schools to “establish a learning partnership with Aboriginal communities”.

 

 

References:

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA). 2013. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures. Retrieved from: http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/History/Cross-Curriculum-Priorities

 

Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved from http://abed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2013). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship (5th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate. (2003). Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved from http://www.curriculusupport.ed-ucation.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf


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Skwirk

Skwirk | Family Culture: A reason to celebrate! | Scoop.it
Catherine Loyola's insight:

Skwirk is a great way to incorporate information and communications technologies (ICT) into teaching the Unit of Study ‘Celebrations’. The HSIE Stage 1 section on Celebrations covers a variety of topics like ‘Types of celebrations’, “How do we celebrate?” and ‘Feelings”. Each topic is then presented in three different ways: an animation, a read-along and a game. 

 

The animation presents relevant and age-appropriate information in a way for children that is both informative and engaging, which undoubtedly aids their understanding of the topics. The read-along, on the other hand, provides similar content and demonstrates how knowledge can be acquired through virtual means. Meanwhile, the use of games can be a great tool for consolidating information, while keeping children motivated.The notion of combining games with an educational foundation is a strategy well-known to pedagogy (Dufficy, 2004; Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013).

 

Part of our duty as teachers is to ensure young people are highly skilled in the area of ICT, given the continually rapid advances in its use and important role in the way people utilise information and technology (MCCETYA, 2008). There is no doubt that children will love utilising this site as technology continues to pervade all aspects of life. Meanwhile, it is important for us to ensure that school connects with the ‘real life’ of the children we teach (Zyngier, 2006). Gilbert and Hoepper (2014) further emphasis how crucial it is for ICT’s potential to be understood with relevance to student motivation, improving quality of life and right of access to information and communication.

 

References:

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically (4th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Education.

 

Dufficy, P. (2005). Designing Learning for Diverse Classrooms. Newtown: PETAA.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2013). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship (5th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (MCEETYA). 2008. Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians. MCEETYA, Carlton South.

 

Zyngier, D. (2008). (Re)conceptualising student engagement: Doing education not doing time, Teaching and Teacher Education, 24, pp.1765–1776.

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