HSIE Stage 3: Nationally Remembered Days in Australia
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Wattle Day Association — Wattle Day

Wattle Day Association — Wattle Day | HSIE Stage 3: Nationally Remembered Days in Australia | Scoop.it
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National Wattle Day is celebrated annually throughout Australia on the 1st of September. Originally dedicated to demonstrate patriotism for the formation of Australia as a post-colonial country in the 1900s before dying out around the second world war, Wattle Day was revived in the 1984 after green and gold were selected as the national colours of Australia, followed by the proclamation of golden wattle as the national floral emblem in 1988. The Wattle Day Association, founded in 1998, “promotes a new Wattle Day oriented towards the future, encompassing positive virtues in the celebration of Australia... [and adapting] its rich symbolism to the great issues Australia faces as a nation still seeking to find its place in the world and as a community-minded people within a global economy.” (Wattle Day Association 2010, para. 17). Wattle Day seeks to present the golden wattle as a national unifying symbol for all Australians, excluding no-one, as well as representing the uniqueness of Australia through the uniqueness of the golden wattle. Significantly, there has been considerable discussion about making Wattle Day the official national day of Australia, replacing Australia Day, as Wattle Day has no negative connotations with invasion and colonisation (Newbury 2011, para. 7).


The site includes resources for activities that can be completed by students and a gallery of photos sent in by schools during their Wattle Day celebrations. Teachers can use this site as a resource for discussing the concept of inclusive national identity with their students and compare Wattle Day with other Australian national days.



Newbury, P. (2011), Why Wattle Day should be our national day, retrieved 13th April 2014, http://www.eurekastreet.com.au/article.aspx?aeid=24746#.U0rakPn1yIo


Wattle Day Assocation (2010), About national wattle day, retrieved 13th April 2014, http://www.wattleday.asn.au/about-wattle-day-1

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Harmony Day

Harmony Day | HSIE Stage 3: Nationally Remembered Days in Australia | Scoop.it
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Harmony Day, celebrated on the 21st of March every year, is a day of cultural respect for everyone who calls Australia home. It is a celebration of diversity and multiculturalism, acknowledging that Australia is an immigrant society - “without continual immigration the modern, urbanised and affluent society of today could not have been created” (Jupp 2007, p. 2). Since the 1970s, Australia has integrated multiculturalism into many of its laws and policies, responding to the large waves of immigrants and refugees settling in Australia and resulting in a society with a high level of linguistic, ethnic, racial and cultural diversity. Many schools around Australia take part in Harmony Day activities.

 

The website presents a wide range of content, including facts and figures about Australia's diversity, community and special events celebrating different foods, music, arts and crafts, sport, dance and language, and a gallery featuring photographs of previous Harmony Day events around Australia. The website also features resources for both students and teachers, including activities that can be completed in class, lesson plans and even resources aligned to the Australian Curriculum. According to pedagogical research undertaken by Banks, acknowledging and integrating multicultral perspectives and and knowledge construction to students in a classroom setting encourages students to become more critical thinkers, creates a teaching culture of equitable teaching, diversifies learning methods, reduces prejudice and ultimately empowers school culture and social structure (Banks 1999, para-1-7).

 

By including Harmony Day celebrations in their school and using this resource to teach students about multiculturalism in their communities and in Australia at large, teachers are able to create an inclusive and positive learning environment in their classroom and instil attitudes that will assist students in learning about their nation as a whole.

 

Banks, J. (1999), Multiculturalism's five dimensions, http://www.learner.org/workshops/socialstudies/pdf/session3/3.Multiculturalism.pdf, retreived 13th April 2014.

 

Jupp, J. (2007) From white Australia to Woomera: the story of Australian immigration, Cambridge University Press

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Australia Chinese New Year 2014

Australia Chinese New Year 2014 | HSIE Stage 3: Nationally Remembered Days in Australia | Scoop.it
Celebrate Lunar New Year in Austalia! Chinese Lunar New Year is a traditional holiday in China, also known as the Spring Festival. Chinese New Year celebrations start on the last day of the last month of the chinese calendar to the Lantern Festival of the 15th day of the first month.
Lily Price's insight:

This website would be an excellent resource for students to explore as part of an introduction to global perspectives. Global perspectives offer students and teachers an approach which takes into account the whole of human society and the environments in which people live, and an opportunity to explore important themes such as change, interdependence, identity and diversity (Australian Government 2008, p. 4).

 

Chinese New Year has rapidly become a staple festival all around Australia, and the associated parades, banquets, community events and rituals have been embraced by many people in Australia, not just people who share a cultural link with Chinese New Year. In particular, Australian Chinese New Year celebrations have become a major attraction for Chinese tourists – since 2010, the number of Chinese visitors to Australia has been rising steadily, with a 14% jump in November of 2013 alone (Calixto 2013, para. 7). In addition, many Chinese citizens are choosing to emigrate, work and live in Australia, adding to Australia's cultural diversity – in the 2011 Australian Census, it was estimated that about four percent of Australia's population, or 865,000 people, identified as Chinese or as having Chinese ancestry (NSW Government 2013, para. 2). This number is expected to rise exponentially by the end of the century.

 

The significance of Chinese New Year as an integral part of Chinese culture and the way in which it has been embraced by wider Australian communities can be used in class discussions about the strong cultural links that are being forged between China and Australia. The website is an excellent resource for looking at the sheer volume of towns, suburbs, cities and communities that hold Chinese New Year celebrations, and the diversity of these celebrations themselves. It can also provide an opportunity for teachers to organise school excursions for students to go and see Chinese New Year events and activities, including parades. It also includes a fun activity that can be undertaken in class, with a reinterpretation of the classic Chinese zodiac wheel using well-known Australian animals such as the koala and echidna.



Australian Government (2008), Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools, Carlton, Australia:Education Services Australia

Calixto, J. (2013), Tourism Australia becomes China friendly, retrieved 13th April 2014, http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2013/02/10/tourism-australia-becomes-china-friendly

NSW Government: Education and Communities (2013), Racism No Way: Chinese Australians, retrieved 13th April 2014, http://www.racismnoway.com.au/teaching-resources/factsheets/74.html

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Dawn Service Gallipoli, Turkey - ANZAC Day 2013 - YouTube

As the sun began to rise over the shores of ANZAC Cove in Gallipoli, Turkey on 25th April 2013, approximately 10,000 people gathered together to pause and re...
Lily Price's insight:

This video contains footage of the ANZAC Dawn Service in 2013, held in Gallipoli. The ANZAC Dawn Service is held every year to commenorate the landing of Australian soldiers on the Gallipoli peninsula in Turkey in 1915 during World War 1, and is part of the broader events of ANZAC Day. ANZAC Day is seen as an important Australian national holiday, in which Australians pause to reflect on the sacrifices made by those who have died at war, as well as “the creation of what became known as the “Anzac legend”, which became an important part of the identity of both [Australia and New Zealand], shaping the ways they viewed both their past and their future.” (Australian War Memorial 2014, para. 5)


ANZAC Day provides a rich source from which students can draw a vast amount of knowledge, ranging from Australia's military history and subsequent national alliances and identity, the ways in which different wars have shaped and continue to change Australia's diversity and culture through immigration, national relations and cultural exchange, and how past and future wars tie Australia to other nations in positive and negative ways. Students watching this video will note how the Dawn Service includes input from Turkish representatives, revealing that the Dawn Service is as much of a Turkish tradition as it is an Australian one. In this way, this resource can be used not only as a resource for learning about ANZAC Day, but in providing a global perspective on how wars – especially wars that engage many different countries at once – cause enormous shifts in cultural identities, national affiliations and populations, often irrevocably changing the face of a nation.



Australian War Memorial (2014), The Anzac Day tradition, retreived 13th April 2014 http://www.awm.gov.au/commemoration/anzac/anzac-tradition/

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Home - National Sorry Day Committee

Home - National Sorry Day Committee | HSIE Stage 3: Nationally Remembered Days in Australia | Scoop.it
Lily Price's insight:

National Sorry Day is an annual event held to remember and commemorate this mistreatment of Australia's indigenous population, particularly for the Stolen Generations. The forcible removal of indigenous children from their families and communities, in order to have then assimilated into “white Australian” culture, means that entire generations of Aboriginal Australians have grown up displaced, their removal preventing them from ever learning their culture, language and identity, as well as the identity of their parents or families. This in turn had a significant impact on Aboriginal culture in Australia, with the loss of some cultural and language groups (National Sorry Day Committee 2013, para. 6-7).

 

Although it is a requirement of the national curriculum that students learn about Aboriginal perspectives and culture, there is considerable confusion in classrooms over the difference between Aboriginal perspectives and Aboriginal knowledge, with a strong generalisation of Aboriginal culture and of Aborginal people in the past rather than in contemporary Australia (Harrison and Greenfield 2011, p. 19). The National Sorry Day Committee website is an excellent resource for students as it provides perspectives on both the past and on contemporary Aboriginal culture and activism; there are links to school programs created by the National Sorry Day Committee, as well as links to the Australian curriculum, events and media reports. Students using the site will be able to learn about Aboriginal perspectives and influences from a primary source and gain an understanding of indigeniety. Students will also be able to use the site to become involved in National Sorry Day, joining in local community events or holding one of their own that involves local indigenous communities, acknowledging the stolen generations and interacting with local Aboriginal culture.

 

Harrison, N. And Greenfield, M. (2011), Relationship to place, Critical Studies in Education, vol. 52, Issue 1

 

National Sorry Day Committee (2013), The history of the stolen generations, retreieved 13th April 2014, http://www.nsdc.org.au/stolen-generations/history-of-the-stolen-generations/the-history-of-the-stolen-generations

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