HSIE Stage 1, Symbols
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Danger Rangers - Sign Safety Game!

Danger Rangers - Sign Safety Game! | HSIE Stage 1, Symbols | Scoop.it
Jade Mieszkuc's insight:

This is an online, interactive game for students to play. It is from the Danger Rangers website which features cartoon, superhero animals that teach children to “think safe, play safe, be safe”. It is a modified version of “memory” but on each card are different safety symbol that are used in the local community. Once students correctly match a pair of cards Danger Ranger Sully explains what the sign means. This game actively engages students while allowing them to become familiar with the symbols used in their school and local community. Furthermore, research has shown that allowing children to play online games in the classroom correlates with “a willingness to engage” which will enhance their understanding of the topic (Warren et. al, 2009, pg. 490).

 

After playing this game, the teacher can walk students around the school and see if they can recognise any of the symbols in their school environment. This allows students to be able to both locate and identify symbols used in the community which is an aspect of the NSW K-6 HSIE Syllabus.

 

As an assessment allow students to play this game multiple times then pick the top five symbols that are the most relevant to your local community and have students write the meaning of each symbol. This is also a good way to test their literacy skills.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Mighty Kids Media. (2011). Danger rangers safety signs. Retrieved April 4, 2014, from http://www.dangerrangers.com/flashgames/safetysigns.html

 

Warren, S., Dondlinger, M., Stein., R., & Barab. S. (2009). Educational game as supplemental learning tool: Benefits, challenges, and tensions arising from use in an elementary school classroom. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 20, 487-505.

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The Countries of the World Song - Europe

A video which shows all the countries in Europe. This song was written and performed by A.J. Jenkins. Video by KidsTV123. Copyright 2011: All rights reserved...
Jade Mieszkuc's insight:

By the time students reach Stage One HSIE they will be able to recognise the Australian Flag as a symbol commonly used to represent Australia. In order to deepen their global understanding this song introduces students to the idea that every country in the world also has a flag which symbolises that particular country. This allows students to see a similarity that every country has in common.

 

This particular link is a song which states each country in Europe whilst zooming in on that country and showing that country’s flag. This links to the Stage One HSIE syllabus by introducing students to be able to locate and identify countries and determine which flag is symbolic of that country.  It is important for students to have a global perspective in their HSIE lessons to both enhance their knowledge of other countries but also to develop an appreciation and respect for other cultures.

 

 This video is not aimed to be the basis of a lesson, rather an introduction to a lesson on flags. The catchy song and bright colours will be appealing to young children. As this is a YouTube clip it is important to have the video in full screen mode before showing it to students in case any inappropriate videos appear in the suggested videos section of the page.

 

 

References:

KidsTV123. (2011). The countries of the world song – Europe. Retrieved April 4, 2014, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOti8U_-BNM

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Japanese vs Australian Cultural Symbols

Jade Mieszkuc's insight:

This is a curriculum support document designed by the NSW Department of Education and Training. Therefore, it may be heavily relied on as a useful and relevant document to be used in NSW Public Schools. It is a valuable document to support teachers to efficiently teach the content in the HSIE Stage One Syllabus. It is a unit of work on Japan but pages 18-21 are about national symbols. This section compares Japan’s and Australia’s national symbols for example the Japanese flag and Australian flag, cherry blossom and wattle. By comparing these two cultures students are able to enhance their understanding of the similarities and differences between Australian and Japanese culture.

 

It includes a selection of important details that are necessary when teaching a lesson such as which outcomes and indicators are being achieved plus a list of extension activities. It contains a range of teaching and learning activities that are suitable for HSIE. It may also be linked to numeracy such as teaching students to count from 1-10 in Japanese.

 

Furthermore, according to research, teaching about Japan will be most efficient with complete collaboration from the school, all teachers and Japanese participants (Kirkwood, 2002, pg. 89). Thus it is important for this support document to be implemented with a whole school approach.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Kirkwood, T. (2002). Teaching about Japan: Global perspectives in teacher decision-making, context, and practice. Theory and Research in Social Education, 30, 88-115.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training Curriculum Support Directorate. (2000). Where The Sun Rises Teacher’s Booklet Human Society and Its Environment Stage 1. Sydney: Author.

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Symbols & Emblems | New South Wales Government

Symbols & Emblems | New South Wales Government | HSIE Stage 1, Symbols | Scoop.it
A flag is an emblem which stands for its people, history and ideals. New South Wales has its own distinctive flag as well as its own coat of arms, crest, state flower, animal, bird and fish.
Jade Mieszkuc's insight:

This page was created by the NSW Government and it lists all the five emblems of NSW as well as the NSW state flag, the colour of NSW, the NSW Coat of Arms and the NSW State Government logo. Next to each symbol is a link that leads to more information about that particular emblem. This a good resource for teaching Stage One HSIE K-6 as it links to the curriculum when teaching students about symbols used by different groups. It also localises the content as rather than teach about Australia’s emblems it has been narrowed down to only NSW’s emblems. This localisation of content makes the syllabus more accessible to students.

 

The information on this website may be used to initiate discussions about the local community such as asking students where they have seen some of these symbols and where they think they may see them. A literacy task based off this website may be to have students write about their favourite NSW emblem explaining which one is their favourite and why. After studying these symbols of NSW an assessment task idea is to create a match-up worksheet. Have the pictures on one side of a sheet of paper and the labels in the wrong order on the other side of the sheet of paper. Students must draw lines connecting the images to their correct labels.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

NSW Government. (2014). Symbols & emblems. Retrieved April 4, 2014, from http://www.nsw.gov.au/about-nsw/symbols-emblems

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Aboriginal Art and Patterning

Aboriginal Art and Patterning | HSIE Stage 1, Symbols | Scoop.it
Aboriginal Art has survived for over thousands of years and continues to be one of the oldest art forms practiced today. Aboriginal Art consists of symbols. These symbols were used as a means of...
Jade Mieszkuc's insight:

This link takes you to an Aboriginal dot painting lesson plan. It is from a website based on art education for children. It can be further developed into a HSIE Stage One lesson plan by doing a prior lesson on the history and the importance of Aborginal dot painting to the Aboriginal community.

 

 This specific lesson plan teaches students about the history of Aboriginal dot painting and gives an explanation of what certain Aboriginal dot painting symbols represent. This lesson is a great opportunity to teach students about several of the symbols used by the Aboriginal community and therefore will develop students’ understanding of some of the Aboriginal community’s beliefs. Furthermore, according to research by Graziano (2004, pg. 42) “learning about the beliefs of others has important outcomes for developing an appreciation of other cultures” which is an important aspect of the HSIE K-6 curriculum.

 

This lesson plan may also be linked to a literacy lesson by having students write a short paragraph detailing what their Aboriginal dot painting represents to them.

 

 Furthermore, this lesson may also be linked to a Creative Arts assessment task by having students swap artwork with a partner and verbally appraising their partner’s artwork, stating at least three aspects of the painting that the student believes makes it a good artwork.

 

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author.

 

Diana, K. (n.d.) Aboriginal art. Retrieved April 4, 2014, from http://art-educ4kids.weebly.com/aboriginal-art-and-patterning.html

 

Graziano, J. (2004). Aboriginal bark painting: Learning about the beliefs of others is important for developing an appreciation of other cultures. School Arts: The Art Education Magazine for Teachers, 103, 42-44.

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