HSIE Stage 1: Stages in a lifetime
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Rescooped by Ben Dawborn from Change and Continuity in the H.S.I.E classroom - Stages in a lifetime
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Cherbourg School Picture Diaries


Via Beatrix Greenhalgh
Ben Dawborn's insight:

The Cherbourg School Picture Diaries is a unique e-book, sourced from the State Library of Queensland. 11 Indigenous students in the town of Cherbourg constructed the text in 2007. It is the story and artwork of each child, showing what they have a passion for in their current life stage. This resource was ‘re-scooped’ from Beatrix Greenhalgh’s page, Change and Continuity in the HSIE classroom- Stages in a Lifetime. All credit for finding this resource goes to her and she has some high quality teaching suggestions in her annotations of the resource. The text would be engaging for students as the language is simple and the text limited, but it is also accompanied by beautiful artwork. Each diary entry is personal and interesting, giving students in the classroom an insight into the lives of these Indigenous Australian children’s lives.

 

Before reading the text hold a class poll, asking students what they think is the current life stage they are in. Some suggestions could be childhood, stage one, living at home, dependent, lower primary school. This could hold a numeracy link in graphs and data that could be explored further using an online polling tool and excel to create basic graphs.Scaffolding students to collate and analyse data in a tables and graphs is a quality teaching pedagogy as it provides an accessible way for young students to understand a wide range of ideas in a concise, concrete and visual way (Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013, p.79).

 

What is important to people in the same life stage as you? Create a word cloud on the smart board as a way of recording the class brainstorm. Introduce the story to the class by talking about diaries and what people write in them, but also introduce the students to the town of Cherbourg, locating it on a map or looking at the school website (as suggested by Beatrix Greenhalgh). Read the text to the class and ask them what was important to each of the students in the text. The suggested ideas should be similar to those students had suggested for the word cloud, such as sport, family, a house, having good friends, etc.

 

The aim of this would be for students to gain an understanding that people of a similar life stage value the same or similar things. To assess their understanding the students could construct their own diary entry (a literacy link) explaining their own interests and values and then choosing one student from the Picture Diaries that shares this interest. In a visual arts lesson students could construct an artwork depicting their friendship with this person. For example, if a student really valued their friends, they could choose Blanche, who also values friendship, and the artwork could be of them with a large group of friends going shopping or playing in the schoolyard.

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Beatrix Greenhalgh's curator insight, April 22, 2013 11:23 PM

This website is an E-book from the State Library of Queensland website. The resource is a picture diary written by the children of Cherbourg public school in Northern Queensland which is a school with predominantly Indigenous students.  The diary is full of artworks made by children accompanied by information about where they live, what they love and who they are.

 

Teaching ideas: Before students begin reading the e-book, teacher locates Cherbourg State School on a map. Then locate their own school on a map. Show students images of the town, school website. Discuss how this is different to their school and where they live. Joint reading of E-book using the interactive white board. After reading discuss the similarities and differences between the students of Cherbourg school and their own lives. Explain that these students are Indigenous Australians and what that means. Students use their individual small whiteboards to write down one similarity and one difference, take turns reading out answers.  Aboriginal perspectives are incorporated into the HSIE syllabus to provide all students with the opportunity to learn about the Aboriginal history, society and cultures (DET 2004).

 

Students write their own description of who they are, what they love and where they live. In a Creative Arts lesson they could illustrate their work. The teacher could conclude the unit by making their own class picture diary.

 

Numeracy/Literacy strategy: Literacy is incorporated into the activity when students discuss the similarities and differences and use the mini whiteboards to write their own opinions of similarities and differences. There is also a suggested literacy task of writing a brief description of their own story.  Students create a joint construction of a text with the help of their teacher and peers (Green, 2006, p.243)

 

Assessment strategy: The teacher collects work samples of students description of their own life, look for spelling, grammar and accurate information. Were students accurately able to depict their own life?

 

#Indigenous #AboriginalEducationTrainingPolicy #Picturebook #Ebook #Churbourg #Allaboutme #Stagesinalifetime #Stage1 #HSIE

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A school's history of sustainability- student produced film

A school's history of sustainability- student produced film | HSIE Stage 1: Stages in a lifetime | Scoop.it
Discover the history of sustainability at a local primary school as two generations of past students reflect on their...
Ben Dawborn's insight:

The ABC Splash website is a high quality teaching resource for any teacher with any stage for any Key Learning area as it provides helpful videos, units of work, lesson ideas, background knowledge and student online games and activities. It is directly linked to the new Australian Curriculum and addresses the new History subject matter directly (see the Year 2 History link in the description below the video, under ‘For Teacher’). This particular video is a terrific resource as the film is student produced. Students can watch this short video and firstly, learn about historical inquiry, secondly, see that schools have change and continuity over time, and thirdly, that students can ask questions, conduct interviews and create short films. The aim of choosing this video is not focused on it’s content, but rather the idea behind it; students inquiring about the history of their school and presenting their research in an interesting way. This resource should be used to inspire rather than teach, to present an example of what students can do, and even though these student are clearly in upper primary, a teacher can scaffold the learning to allow students in Stage One to conduct interviews, inquire about their school’s history and yes, even create a short film. This would be an appropriate research and analysis task for this inquiry based learning of stages in a lifetime.

 

After watching the video with the class ask the students what they liked about the video. What could we investigate about in our school? Who could we talk to? Where could we find information? Do you think we could make a class documentary? A significant life stage that all students would have experienced would be their first day at school. Conduct a think, pair and share with the class about their first day of school: What did you feel? What happened? What classroom were you in? Take the students to the school office, or archive room and find pictures of past students on their first day of school. Do they look similar or different to your memories? Like in the video, ask old students to come into your classroom, preferably of several generations. Students can conduct a basic interview of the past student about their first day at school. Students writing their own questions and then asking them in a class-wide interview would be a high quality literacy task. This active participation in oracy will improve all aspects of literacy and language use (Winch and Holliday, 2010, p.53). Film all of the student’s research and bring it together in a basic short video.

 

To assess their understanding ask students to compare the first day of school stories from different times. How has the experience changed? What has stayed the same?

 

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An Aussie Year

An Aussie Year | HSIE Stage 1: Stages in a lifetime | Scoop.it
Ben Dawborn's insight:

This website is a great electronic resource for teachers with a Stage One class. When studying the Change and Continuity syllabus point, “Stages in a lifetime”, it is important that the teacher establishes a series of effective lessons which are engaging and informative but are founded on an inquiry based learning framework (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.57). This website, the teachers notes to the book An Aussie Year, would be a useful resource as it provides great inside knowledge into the conception of the book and includes a list of teaching activities to follow a class-wide reading of the text. One draw back of this website is that is does not include an online copy of the book, the teacher must buy it separately and then use the website to gain information and support. In exploring other sections of the website it can be seen that there are also a few student resources including a colouring in sheet, word search and spot the difference and although none of these task are strictly educational it may just be a fun way to get the students involved in the text.

 

The book itself, An Aussie Year, would be a fantastic resource to introduce an inquiry approach into “Stages in a lifetime”. The book goes through the lives of five young Australians over the course of a year, all with different cultural backgrounds and experiences allowing for both a Global and Indigenous Australian perspective. The children are all seven years old, which means they will be directly relatable to Stage One students. Read the book to the class to motivate and engage the students and at the conclusion have students report back some of the events, celebrations and stages that occurred within that year. The content descriptors in the syllabus ask for students in Stage One to construct basic timelines, so scaffold this complex task by using the smart board or a large piece of paper to put in order the events that happened in the book.

 

To go deeper into the literacy aspect of the book have the class reason why the author wrote the book and what writing style they used. The teacher can use the helpful information on the website to form an understanding.

 

For an extended numeracy link have students work on the computer using the online resource Timeline Maker, http://www.softschools.com/teacher_resources/timeline_maker/

Students should construct a simple timeline of their lives with only five to seven points, including when they were born, when they said their first words, when they started school, etc.

 

To assess their learning have a class discussion; this will also establish a main inquiry question and check student’s current understanding and background knowledge so you can teach accordingly. What life stages happened to the children in the book? What life stages have you already been through? Do all children have the same experiences and stages? Does culture change your life events, celebrations and experiences? What life stages do you think will happen to you in the future?

 

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National Museum of Australia - Then and Now- Excursion

National Museum of Australia - Then and Now- Excursion | HSIE Stage 1: Stages in a lifetime | Scoop.it
Ben Dawborn's insight:

This link will take teachers to the pre-programmed excursion run by the National Museum Australia. This excursion would be a fantastic experience for the students as it is specifically run for students in their age bracket, it address challenging History content with tangible hands-on exploration of the past and is structured in quality learning framework allowing for reflection time. The website provides all of the key information a teacher would need when organising an excursion including, time, pricing, clear aims and structure, booking details and further resources to explore in the classroom. The excursion itself allows for some free time for students to explore the museum. It would be highly recommended that in this free time students explore ‘Kspace’, a room designed for children which explores the future, allowing them to design houses and transport and the see their designs come to life in a 3D theatre.

 

Although the excursion is linked to the new History curriculum it is still relevant to participating in an inquiry based learning unit on ‘Stages in a Lifetime’. With students experiencing and comparing Australia of the past, present and future, they will gain an understanding of things that change and things that stay the same. To link this learning back into the classroom and make it more relevant to life stages the class could watch the My Place TV series, access via http://www.myplace.edu.au/home.html. This series explores the life of Australian children over 24 decades, beginning before European invasion and ending in 2008. The video series would be relevant and engaging to children, as they can visually compare their life with each decade, both also see how the roles, responsibilities and life stages of children have changed for children over time. This series also contains a fantastic Indigenous perspective, showing life before white men but has a strong focus on reconciliation and saying "sorry" in the 2008 episode. The recognition of our Indigenous past, present and future is vital when dealing in our contemporary classrooms, but can be tricky due to our complex and shameful past (Harrison, 2011). It is hard to discuss topics like invasion and the Stolen Generation with Stage One (a Stage Two and up topic) but these videos provide a small step in that direction. The series and teacher resources found on the website are focused on Stage Two and Three, but a competent Stage One teacher could easily adapt some of the suggested activities for their class.

 

By linking the excursion with a few of the My Place episodes students will see, touch and hear how the life of children in Australia has changed over time. To assess their learning students may undertake a literacy task of recounting and reflecting (verbally or in written form) key things that they have learned after the excursion and/or the episodes.  

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Imagine you are Burtukan...

Burtukan is one of around a billion people on the planet who are chronically hungry. But she's got a vision. Seven-year-old Burtukan runs a make-believe cafe...
Ben Dawborn's insight:

This YouTube video was originally used as a persuasive advertisement to get children involved in the 2012 40 Hour Famine, run by World Vision Australia. However, this is still an engaging and informative resource to promote a Global perspective into the “Stages in a Lifetime” subject matter. This video is highly effective because as the title implies, “Imagine you are Burtukan”, it directly places the students into another child’s shoes through second person narration. The video is clear in that it explores each part of Burtukan’s daily life. What is particularly inspiring about this video is that it shows how even a child in so much need can still encourage fun and happiness if the life of their friends. It is important for students to be exposed to a global perspective so they can learn about the world and be inspired to be a global citizen who actively pursue change in the world.

 

Watch the video in class and after the video discuss with the class something they already knew, something they learnt and a further inquiry question they wish to explore. Find Ethiopia on a map and talk about what ‘famine’ means and what famine has changed in the Horn of Africa. Using a basic graphic organiser, like a ‘t’ chart, have students suggest ways that their life is different and similar to Burtukan’s. Talk about the similarities and differences of their past life experiences, present lives and future life stages. Because Burtukan is seven years old it will be directly relatable to the students in Stage One.

 

An important aspect of an inquiry model to HSIE teaching is taking action. Ask students: Do you think Burtukan will have the same life opportunities in her future as you do? Is that fair? How can we help? Because the video was for the 40 Hour Famine many students may suggest this, but be careful, students in Stage One should not be encouraged to participate in the full 40 hours, the safer 12 hour famine may be suggested. Show the class another World Vision video, this one on child sponsorship, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHMm5UK42Ew. How can child sponsorship change these children’s future life stages? Who has a family sponsor child at home? Students could bring in letters their sponsor children have written into class. The aim of this assessment is for students to bring something that is relevant to them into the classroom and reflect on it, essential principles of quality teaching and learning (Marsh, 2010).

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