HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Looking after our environment
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HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Looking after our environment
Useful resources for teaching and learning about the environment, focusing on care of resources, including waste disposal.
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Environmental children’s books | Growing Up Greener

Environmental children’s books | Growing Up Greener | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Looking after our environment | Scoop.it
Environmental and sustainability education for primary and pre-school aged children
Monique Jamgotchian's insight:

Kellie Bollard’s Growing Up Greener site is an excellent resource for educating HSIE Stage 1 students about environmental sustainability and responsibility. Bollard’s three books: Worms: the Mechanics of Organics, In the Bin and Permaculture Gardens; Sow, Grow, Care, Share are suitable textual introductions to the themes outlined in the HSIE syllabus for Stage 1 Environments, in which students will learn about caring for resources, including waste disposal. All three books work to engage a Stage 1 audience though rhyming narratives. In the Bin asks:

Where does is all go? Where does it end up?
When it goes from the bin, into the back of the truck.
 

Bollard’s books are a great way to introduce important environmental themes through content relatable to students experiences. By posing such questions about where waste goes, students are lead to consider their personal responsibility in reducing waste through recycling. After reading In the Bin, a teacher could direct students to investigate their own school recycling practices, and consider the ways in which they could be improved. Activities such as identifying recycling signs or matching the correct recycling bin lid colour to a rubbish item are some ways teachers could improve students’ recycling knowledge. Worms: the Mechanics of Organics and Permaculture Gardens; Sow, Grow, Care, Share are the perfect introduction to starting a school garden project, in which students can gain a hands-on approach to caring for the environment, and contribute to the minimisation of waste through composting and worm farming. 

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Tamyka Mills's curator insight, June 6, 2014 3:03 AM

Kellie Bollard's 'Growing UP Greener' site is based around providing educational books based on teaching children about sustainability in the classroom. The books provided at this site are an excellent resource for use within the primary school classroom as a tool to prompt discussions about sustainability and sustainability responsibility.  These books provide a perfect resource to introduce the topic in a way that students can relate their experiences to. Students develop their understanding of sustainability topics such as recycling for future activities which can be based on the books.

 

Kellie Bollard's 'Growing UP Greener' site provide books that aligns with with the Australian Curriculum: sustainability where students learn that Sustainable futures result from actions designed to preserve our environment (ACARA, 2014).

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/CrossCurriculumPriorities/Sustainability

 

The books also align with the Australian Curriculum: Technologies where students recognise the role of people in sustainability (ACTDEK010) (ACARAA, 2014)

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/technologies/design-and-technologies/Curriculum/F-10?y=F-2&y=3-4&y=5-6&y=7-8&y=9-10&s=DEPPS&s=DEKU&p=3&layout=1 

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Home - Cool Australia

Cool Australia is educating young Australians for a sustainable future.
Monique Jamgotchian's insight:

Cool Australia is a fantastic FREE educational resource for teachers and students.
 

Teachers can organise a curriculum unit using Cool Australia’s inquiry learning approach, which organises student learning into the following categories: Prior learning; Tuning in; Finding out; Drawing conclusions; Finding solutions; Considering social action and Reflection and evaluation.
 

Students can gather data about their school’s litter problem, and/or go on an excursion to the local park to see the effects of litter on their community. Students can draw conclusions about their findings, and think of strategies for overcoming these litter problems. Creating litter awareness posters are a fun way for students to demonstrate their knowledge. Students can place these posters where they think they are most likely to educate other students and teachers about sensible waste disposal. In collaboration with the community, posters could be displayed outside the school, such as the local library, nursing home, or a local business.
 

This comprehensive model allows Stage 1 students to develop deep levels of thinking and application of their knowledge, and ensures that learning connects strongly with communities beyond the classroom. These Principles of Learning and Teaching (PoLT) have been developed by the Victorian Government to support and strengthen teacher’s pedagogical practice, to which Cool Australia is strongly aligned. 

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Ollie's World - Interactive sustainability resource for kids

Sustainability resource for kids providing fun and entertaining ways to learn how to reduce, reuse, recycle and rethink in the areas of waste, water, energy, air and biodiversity.
Monique Jamgotchian's insight:

Join Ollie and his friends: Sally, Tran, Maria, Tom, Larry and Buster and learn about the 4R’s – Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rethink, through this fun interactive website for students.

 

‘Ollie Saves the Planet’ helps students learn the language of caring for resources and waste disposal through the ‘Word Check’ tab, which contains a useful glossary, to which students can easily refer if they are unsure of the meaning of a word, thus helping to support students’ literacy achievement. Students can develop their ICT and individual inquiry skills by navigating through the website’s easy interface, where students can browse such topics as: Waste, Water, Energy, Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Each topic contains information and creative ideas for caring about resources. Ollie’s ‘Clubhouse’ has a crossword, slider puzzle, memory game and an energy saving game which are engaging activities for HSIE stage 1 students to consolidate their newly found knowledge and vocabulary when talking about the environment.

 

‘Ollie Recycles’ includes a waste sorting game which gets students to correctly recycle a range of rubbish items. The simulation game encourages decision making, and is supported by recycling tips each time the student correctly identifies which recycling practise is best, for example: reminding students to remove the lid of plastic bottles before putting them in the recycling bin. The game encourages students to think about reusing items, and provides immediate feedback to students, encouraging students to ‘rethink’ their understanding if they are unsure of the best waste disposal option.

 

Paid teacher resources are also available through this site, although, I think it works best as an ICT tool for students to gain computer literacy, while consolidating information learned from local place-based learning.  

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People and the environment | Global Education

People and the environment | Global Education | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Looking after our environment | Scoop.it
Monique Jamgotchian's insight:

This resource for teachers provides activities and an extensive photo gallery to introduce a global perspective of people and the environment to students. The website focuses on globalisation to understand the implications of human impact on the environment to highlight the importance of environmental sustainability for the future.
 

The website contains classroom activities with supporting gallery images to encourage and assist students to think about themselves in relation to the environment, both locally and globally. One activity gets students to play with an inflatable globe, to identify the natural elements of the world, such as the land and ocean, to then ask: what cannot be seen on the globe? This sets up the comparison of the natural and built environment nicely, creating a platform for students to discuss how different people use environments differently, and how such human activities affect the environment. This activity is supported by the website’s photo gallery that provides important visuals for students to understand global contexts more fully.  This task relates directly to the HSIE K-6 syllabus outcomes: ENS1.5 Compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these, and ENS1.6 Demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people.

Students can learn about caring for resources, such as energy use and natural resources by reading Jen Green’s book: Why Should I Save Energy? Students are encouraged to ‘read between the lines’ of the book, to consider how they would feel about having no power at school. Taking from the idea of Earth Hour, a class could work for a full day (or a couple or hours, say, from recess to lunch) without using any electricity. This experiential demonstration of caring for resources would be a powerful lesson for students to appreciate the reliability of their resources, especially when contrasted with those of developing or third world countries.

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An Aboriginal perspective on Caring for Place - Caring for Country.

Monique Jamgotchian's insight:

The land was given to us, it’s our home. God gave it to us, he told us

to look after it and that’s what we do, look after the land.

                                                        - Emily Munyungka Austin
 

‘Caring for Place – Caring for Country’ is a unit of work designed to support teachers of Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) Stage 1 classes about relationship to land, from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.  The document includes statements of relationship to land made by Indigenous Australians. These reflections can be read to students, introducing them to the sacred connection of Aboriginal people to their Land, to understand that: different cultures have differing relationships with the environment.
 

This resource includes nine comprehensive topics; two of which are based on HSIE K–6 syllabus Stage 1 outcomes that focus on the care of resources. The topic, Valuing Place and Country (pg.72), involves reading Wiradjuri author, Connie Ah See’s story: ‘The river is big’ (which is included in the PDF). Students learn about the various uses of Aboriginal Land:  Hunting, fishing, bush tucker, shelters, in the story, as Connie explains the special things she does with her family in Wiradjuri country. The story illustrates Aboriginal peoples’ inextricable connection to the Land, allowing students to learn about Aboriginal peoples’ resourceful relationship and reliance on their environment (ENS1.6).  
 

The topic, Respecting Place and Country (pg.78) highlights the importance of preserving the environment from an Aboriginal perspective, to understand that caring for Place and Country involves looking after the land. Worksheet 17 asks students to brainstorm the ways they can look after, and stay connected their own place. Students learn about the importance of Aboriginal Elders sharing information about looking after the Land through stories, so that it can be appreciated by future generations. 

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Aneenha Orkey's curator insight, March 30, 2014 1:43 AM

This unit of work from the NSW Curriculum Support outlines aspects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' relationship and connection to land, and stories from different Australian Aboriginal peoples. 

It can be a helpful starting point for students to build understanding and respect for the culture of native Australians, and gain insights into their perspectives.