HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating
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BBC - 2nd level Dance - Classical Indian dance - Kathak

BBC - 2nd level Dance - Classical Indian dance - Kathak | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating | Scoop.it
A famous Kathak dancer is preparing to perform a traditional Kathak dance.
Lauren Boyd's insight:

The video looks at Kathak storytelling, a way of communicating stories through dance and hand movement in indian culture.  The video is both engaging and informative for students as it follows Kathak dancer, Antarra Singh, presenting a global perspective for students on ways of communicating.  It also provides classroom ideas for teachers to incorporate the video into the classroom.

 

Activity and Assessment

 

While watching the video as a class, teachers can pause at certain times to ask students what might be being depicted, or what might happen next, engaging students in thinking ahead, and using their own knowledge of the world to make inferences about what they are watching.

Afterward, teachers can lead a  discussion about the different types of dancing we see in Australia and other western cultures, looking at hip hop, ballet, Aboriginal dances in order to compare and contrast, and gain an understanding of how dance can convey meaning. Discussion of why stories might be told through mediums like dance instead of ordinary form should be looked at, drawing attention to identities, customs and practices of other cultures, linked with CUS1.3 (NSW BoS,2007, p.48) .

 

Students could then produce a simple description of what happened in the dance, along with a picture. This addresses CUS1.4  by enabling students to describe the cultural practices of another community and WS1.9 “Plans, reviews and produces a small range of simple literary and factual texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers” (NSW DET, 2006).

 

The act of engaging students in speculation, and prediction of what might happen next (as occurs in my teaching idea for watching the video) helps students in being able to use language fluently and grammatically. In describing and comparing texts, students can work toward developing skills in descriptive language while building upon vocabulary and attention to detail (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: history, geography, economics & citizenship (5th ed.). Southbank, VIC: Cengage Learning.

 

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006). Curriculum planning, programming, assessing and reporting to parents k-12. Retrieved April 2, 2014, from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/cogs/curricplanframes1.htm

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Behind the News - 11/05/2010: Tiwi Music

Behind the News - 11/05/2010: Tiwi Music | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating | Scoop.it
Lauren Boyd's insight:

The segment on Tiwi music from the ABC’s Behind The News program provides a great introduction to the Tiwi practice of communicating through song. It follows Genevieve Campbell who is helping to translate and record traditional Tiwi songs in order to preserve the languages and customs of the Tiwi culture. In this respect, it links with CUS1.4, by drawing students’ attention to the “cultural, linguistic and religious practices of their family, their community and other communities” (NSW BoS, 2007, p.48). The video reflects an interesting viewpoint of Indigenous Australians, highlighting the importance of preservation in culture, and how this assists in communicating knowledge to future generations.

 

Activity

With the aid of a mind map, teachers could generate classroom discussion by asking questions about what happens in the segment, why Genevieve Campbell thinks it’s so important to record these songs, and what the purpose of these songs are.

Teachers could also offer an interesting contrast with classic bedtime stories that the children know, engaging in discussion about the lessons and morals behind the stories, and how this is also seen in the songs of the Tiwi people, addressing CUS1.3.

 

This activity means students engage with Critical and Creative Thinking as outlined by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) by enabling students to compare and contrast different cultures and ways of communicating, allowing their existing knowledge to progress within a new context (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014).

 

References

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: history, geography, economics & citizenship (5th ed.). Southbank, VIC: Cengage Learning.

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ch_etiquette.pdf

Lauren Boyd's insight:

The Guidelines for Student Cultural Exchanges with China provide a great background for teachers on forms of communication within the Chinese community. Teachers can use the sections on greetings and interactions (including non-verbal interactions) as a starting point for educating students on ways of communicating within cultures from a global perspective. In providing a global perspective, students can learn the importance of relating to and communicating across cultures (Australian Government, 2008).

 

Activity and Assessment

Teachers could find and print pictures of different greetings from around the world, e.g touching noses shaking hands etc, and lead a discussion about the different ways cultures greet each other. Discussion could also focus on the occasions when greetings are used, and how these change and adapt to different situations, addressing CUS1.3 (NSW BoS, 2007, p.48).

Teachers can then use a cultural example of ways of communicating by introducing students to displays of communication in China. Teachers could create a ven diagram to compare and contrast greetings and communication within Australia and within China, generating student discussion, e.g Australians will often kiss the cheek when greeting someone, while in Chinese culture, kissing in public is unacceptable. This forms a link to CUS1.4 by contrasting the way their own families communicate in comparison to other families and communities (NSW BoS, 2007).

Teachers could use role-play as a form of assessment.  Students can form pairs and then demonstrate the different ways Australians greet each other compared to Chinese people greeting each other. For example students will role play how Australians greet a close friend, and then how Chinese people might do the same. Students can then display these role plays to the class, which address not just CUS1.3 and CUS1.4, but outcomes TS1.2 and TS1.3 “recognizes a range of purposes and audiences for spoken language and considers how own talking and listening are adjusted in different situations” (NSW DET, 2006).

 

The use of role play provides the student with a tangible experience, encouraging skills in perspective as students take on the point of view of someone else within the context of a situation that is familiar or new (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.90).

 

 

References

 

Australian Government. (2008). Global Perspectives: A Framework for Global Education in Australian Schools. Retrieved April 11, 2014 from http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: history, geography, economics & citizenship (5th ed.). Southbank, VIC: Cengage Learning.

 

 NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006). Curriculum planning, programming, assessing and reporting to parents k-12. Retrieved April 2, 2014, from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/cogs/curricplanframes1.htm

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Aboriginal Dreamtime - Aboriginal Symbols

Aboriginal Dreamtime - Aboriginal Symbols | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating | Scoop.it
Lauren Boyd's insight:

 Studying traditional Aboriginal art acts as a contrast to the oral tradition of storytelling seen in the Tiwi culture, and shows how Indigenous Australians use art and symbols to communicate important lessons and pass on knowledge within the community.  This website looks specifically at the art of the Yorta Yorta people and their depiction of The Dreaming. This resource meets the selection criteria for selecting an appropriate Aboriginal perspective by recognizing the five key evaluation criteria; it depicts authentic Aboriginal paintings and avoids stereotypes of the period before the 1980s, involves Aboriginal participation and acknowledges the Aboriginal artists involved, represents both men and women, has been endorsed by Aboriginal groups and does not present any sacred material (QLD Studies Authority, 1995).

 

Activity and Assessment

 

 Teachers could initially generate discussion about the purpose of Aboriginal symbols and paintings and how this differs from other viewpoints such as viewing art for decorative purposes. Discussion could also move onto the experiences communicated in the paintings, how they are important in preserving Aboriginal culture, and how they might differ from issues depicted in European art.

Teachers could then print off a handout of the symbols, first asking students to predict what each symbol might be and then discussing what each symbol represents so that students can fill in their handouts.

 These exercises link to outcomes CUS1.3 and CUS1.4 by offering students the opportunity to identify symbols and traditions within Aboriginal families, and cultural practices of another community (NSW BoS, 2007, p.48).  

 The study of indigenous cultural expressions could also act as a building block for looking at connectedness in communication by bringing an Aboriginal speaker in to talk to students about the significance of traditional Aboriginal expression. This is also incredibly important in gaining an indigenous perspective that does not contain bias and reinforces the importance of Aboriginal people to be able to speak for their own community so that expressions such as paintings are not trivialized.

  Students could then create their own painting in class using the Aboriginal symbols they have learned. The painting might depict a favourite scene from a book the class has recently read. Teachers can add an effective literacy strategy to this exercise by getting students to present a ‘show and tell’ about their painting to the class, asking students to tell the class about what is occurring in the paintings and why they chose to depict this particular scene. This acts as a catalyst for addressing TS1.2 “interacts in more extended ways with less teacher intervention, makes increasingly confident oral presentations and generally listens attentively” (NSW DET, 2006). This activity also addresses the outcome TS1.1 “communicates with an increasing range of people for a variety of purposes on both familiar and introduced topics in spontaneous and structured classroom activities”.

 

 

 Activities which promote connectedness, such as that experienced when a speaker from the community visits the school, enhance more complex thinking, inviting students to participate in a deeper understanding (Gilbert &Hoepper, 2014, p.70).

 

 References

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW

  

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006). Curriculum planning, programming, assessing and reporting to parents k-12. Retrieved April 2, 2014, from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/cogs/curricplanframes1.htm

 

QLD Studies Authority. (2007) A Resource Guide for Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Melbourne, Australia: Curriculum Corporation.

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SignPlanet.net > Auslan (Australian Sign Language) > Online Games and Activities

SignPlanet.net > Auslan (Australian Sign Language) > Online Games and Activities | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating | Scoop.it

Access to searchable sign language resources for children and adult sign language learners, and Auslan teachers, anywhere, anytime! This is a subscriber service, provided by Bilby Publishings - Sign Lanugage Resource Developers and Distributors.

Lauren Boyd's insight:

Sign Planet is an interactive website that introduces children to sign language as a form of communication within a group of people. The website is appropriate for stage 1 and includes games and charts depicting sign language, in a way that is incredibly engaging and memorable for students

 

Activity and Assessment

Teachers could first generate discussion on different ways people communicate,by talking about some of the cultures that the class has already looked at, and any other experiences the students have with communication in the groups they interact with on a daily basis.

Teachers could then introduce sign language as a form of communication within a community by introducing Sign Planet and having students log on to interact with games and sign language charts, in order to gain familiarity with the types of signs used. This addresses outcome CUS1.3 by comparing customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other families (NSW BoS, 2007, p.48).

After interacting with the website, teachers could gather students in a circle to practice sign language signs, displaying the signs and asking students to write on paper the emotion corresponding with that sign. This can act as a motivator for students to use their time on the website effectively, as opposed to seeing it as ‘free time’. This can also act as a tool of assessing WS1.11 “uses knowledge of sight words and letter-sound correspondences to spell familiar words” (NSW DET, 2006).

 

Engaging students directly with information and communication technologies allows lessons to be relevant and engaging for students. Teachers who incorporate ICT into their teaching practice are reflecting the changing demands of the modern world and are adapting their practice to accommodate the skills and knowledge students will need in a society where communication and technology is ever changing (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW

 

 Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: history, geography, economics & citizenship (5th ed.). Southbank, VIC: Cengage Learning.


NSW Department of Education and Training. (2006). Curriculum planning, programming, assessing and reporting to parents k-12. Retrieved April 2, 2014, from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/timetoteach/cogs/curricplanframes1.htm

 

 

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