HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating (Cabramatta Public School)
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HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating (Cabramatta Public School)
Resources for HSIE for Stage One Subject 'different ways of communicating' for Outcomes CUS1.3 and CUS1.4 (Cultures)
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Stories to unite us | 1— Introduce the unit with You and Me: Our Place

Stories to unite us | 1— Introduce the unit with You and Me: Our Place | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating (Cabramatta Public School) | Scoop.it
Jen Whyte's insight:

The Global Words website is an initiative of World Vision Australia and the Primary English Teaching Association Australia (PETAA). It presents twelve units of work designed to integrate English teaching with global citizenship education.

 

The ‘Stories that Unite Us’ unit provides opportunities for students to appreciate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures and in particular the importance of the oral storytelling tradition, beginning with the picture book You and Me: Our Place (written by Leonie Norrington and illustrated by Dee Huxley). This website provides a number of teaching suggestions to accompany this book many of which would be suitable or adaptable for Stage 1 students, including examination of the front cover and prediction of the characters and story.

 

You and Me: Our Place is a story about connections between old and young, and the way history is handed down between the generations in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures. Two young boys spend their days fishing with old Uncle Tobias, and hunting for bush tucker in the sand and mangroves. Uncle Tobias tells stories of the past when his family came to fish in this place, connecting the boys with past generations. This book represents the idea that within Aboriginal cultures, narratives and yarning have been key to thinking, learning, doing, knowing and being for many thousands of years (Yunkaporta & Kirby, 2011, p.205).

 

In addition to reading and discussing You and Me: Our Place, a teacher could invite a representative from the Gandangara Local Aboriginal Land Council (http://www.glalc.org.au/) to present story about their country and their culture, as Cabramatta Public School sits on their land.

 

Introducing this local perspective enhances the sense that the school is part of the wider community, and embraces the notion that knowledge and stories are closely associated with land (Stevens & McDonald, 2011, p.392)

 

Furthermore, the NSW DET Aboriginal Education and Training Policy highlights the importance of incorporating the values and practices of local Aboriginal communities into mainstream education (NSW DET Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate, 2009, p.14).

 

 

References:

 

New South Wales Department of Education and Training Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate. (2009). Aboriginal Education and Training Policy: An Introductory Guide. Retrieved from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/students/access_equity/aborig_edu/aetp_intro.pdf

 

Norrington, L. (2007). You and Me: Our Place. Kingswood, Australia: Working Title Press.

 

Stevens, V., & McDonald, H. (2011). Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in SOSE. pp.385-402

 

Yunkaporta, T., & Kirby, M. (2011). Yarning up Indigenous Pedagogies: A Dialogue About Eight Aboriginal Ways of Knowing. In Purdie, N., Milgate, G., & Bell, H. (Eds), Two way teaching and learning: toward culturally reflective and relevant education (pp.205-213). Camberwell, Australia: ACER Press

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Global Wonders: Hello Song with Sing-a-long

Jen Whyte's insight:

The 'Hello Song' is an ideal introduction to the notion of diversity in languages. The song contains the word for ‘Hello’ in a number of languages. The teacher would need to be prepared with a list of each language mentioned in the song for this lesson.

 

Activity:

 

Students could learn to sing along with the song, and then discuss the languages they know and how to say ‘hello’ in these. This discussion may be most fruitful at a school with a large proportion of students who speak a language other than English at home. Cabramatta Public School is one such school, with students representing over 40 cultural groups, and so I have chosen to locate these lessons at this school. At Cabramatta PS, students attend 2 hours of language class each week, either in their first language or in Mandarin. Therefore, even students who have English as a first language would be able to contribute their knowledge of Mandarin to the discussion.

 

This process connects what they already know and experience (speaking a language other than English at home, then undertaking schooling in English) with the more abstract notion of language diversity globally. As Lombardi (2007, p.8) discusses, a learner’s ability to connect a new concept to a lived experience creates an authentic learning experience. It also is a mechanism for students to reflect on their connectedness to the world, a key element of authentic pedagogy (Gilbert, 2011, pp.144-145).

 

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. (2011). Active and experiential learning. In Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds), Teaching Society and Environment (pp.141-157). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

 

Lombardi, M. (2007). Authenic Learning for the 21st Century: An overview. Educause Learning Initiative Paper. Retrieved from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI3009.pdf

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Ms. Feist's Grade 2 Class Blog — Just Another Wonderful Day at Banff Elementary School!

Ms. Feist's Grade 2 Class Blog — Just Another Wonderful Day at Banff Elementary School! | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating (Cabramatta Public School) | Scoop.it
Jen Whyte's insight:

This class blog details the daily activities of a Grade Two Class in Banff Elementary School in Canada. The class teacher, Ms Feist, posts about the class’s daily lessons, students’ birthdays, special activities and excursions.  

 

The use of class blogs is an example of the ability to technology to enhance learning through connections with real-world contexts (Roschelle et al., 2000, p.82). Blogs connect students with the experiences of people in places they may never experience firsthand.

 

Activity and assessment:

 

The teacher could choose a post from Ms Feist’s class blog and read it through with the class. As a whole class or in groups, students work together to write a short response to the post. This comment could be about a similar activity the class has done or why they liked reading about the activity. The teacher then submits the comment to Ms Feist’s class blog. This activity could be extended by the creation of your own class blog with contributions from students and parents to read and comment at home with their children.

 

These activities link with English Stage One Outcomes TS1.1 ('Communicates with an increasing range of people for a variety of purposes on both familiar and introduced topics in spontaneous and structured classroom activities') and WS1.9 ('Plans, reviews and produces a small range of simple literary and factual texts for a variety of purposes on familiar topics for known readers') (NSW BoS, 2007, p.17, 19).

 

The teacher should introduce this activity by discussing the meaning of a blog and how it can be used. Banff, Canada could also be located on a world map, then Google Street View used to look at Banff Elementary School. The teacher should also explore how much students might already know about a blog or writing online, such as whether they are exposed to anything similar at home, as these considerations should inform the design of the task (as discussed by McDonald & Gilbert, 2011, p.108).

 

 

References:

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In Gilerbt, R. & Hoepper, B. (Eds), Teaching Society and Environment (pp.99-121). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

 

New South Wales Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/english/k6_english_syl.pdf

 

Roschelle, J., Pea, R., Hoadley, C., Gordin, D. & Means, B. (2000). Changing How and What Children Learn in School with Computer-Based Technologies. The Future of Children, 10(2), pp.76-101.

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School of the Air

School of the Air | HSIE Stage 1 Different Ways of Communicating (Cabramatta Public School) | Scoop.it
Going to school is pretty normal for Aussie kids who live near big cities and towns. But there are some kids who can't get to a school because they live in such remote areas.
Jen Whyte's insight:

The ‘School of the Air’ video from the ABC’s Behind the News program introduces students in regular schools to the School of the Air for children from remote parts of Australia. This segment shows the communication students at the School of the Air have with their teacher and other students via audio and video links. It also examines the benefits gained by the students from meeting up with their classmates from time to time.

 

Activity and assessment:

 

This video is an ideal starter for a class discussion about the different ways children across Australia attend their school. Students could discuss the ways a normal school day for students attending the School of the Air differs from a day at Cabramatta Public School and how they would get to know their classmates if they weren’t in the same classroom. The teacher could freeze the video at various scenes to discuss how the student is receiving information, communicating and contributing in their classroom.

 

Students could create a class story board for the different parts of their school day alongside a day for students at the School of the Air. The teacher could provide pictures of the key parts of the class’s day (such as morning assembly, reading time, lunch in the playground, maths group work) and a hypothetical day of a student from the School of the Air, with students required to match the pictures.

 

The teacher may arrange a video link up with a teacher and/or students from the School of the Air and undertake a lesson simultaneously.

 

The process of being involved in, rather than simply seeing or hearing about, a School of the Air lesson, is an example of active and experiential learning, where students move beyond passive reception of concepts and gain a greater understanding of their connectedness to the world (Gilbert, 2011, p.43)

 

 

Reference:

 

Gilbert, R. (2011). Active and experiential learning. In Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (Eds), Teaching Society and Environment (pp.141-157). South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

 

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Arthur . Print . You've Got Braille | PBS Kids

Find out about Prunella blind friend and how braille can help blind people read! Enter a message into the braille translator.
Jen Whyte's insight:

This website allows students to write a short message into the ‘Braille translator’ and print out the resulting Braille transcript. Students then place small drops of glue on each dot to get a feel for reading Braille (assistance from the teacher or helper may be required for this step).

 

The class could discuss how much of what we learn at school is done through reading, and how much information at school, home and in the community is conveyed in written words. Students could examine signs at school and/or undertake an excursion to look at the signs in their local area, take a photo, then come back to class with their collection to demonstrate the prevalence of written communication. The class could brainstorm the other ways this information or instructions could be communicated.

 

Students’ contribution to the class’s ideas about different ways of communicating with is a mechanism for addressing Outcome TS1.2 of the English Syllabus for Stage One (‘Interacts in more extended ways with less teacher intervention, makes increasingly confident oral presentations and generally listens attentively') (NSW BoS, 2007, p.17). This task also contributes to the fostering of an inclusive school community, in this instance regarding the inclusion of students with a disability.

 

The ‘You’ve Got Braille’ website demonstrates the ability of technology to contribute to an authentic learning activity for students. Rather than reading or viewing information about vision impairment, students are able to place themselves in the shoes of a person with the condition. This connection avoids the problematic tendency for assuming the use of technology in learning is an automatically positive approach, rather than examining how it is being used (Mishra & Koehler, 2006, p.1018).

 

 

Reference:

 

Mishra, P. and Koehler, M. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), pp.1017-1054.

 

New South Wales Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/english/k6_english_syl.pdf

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