HSIE Stage 1 Cultures - Languages spoken by other groups and families (OR we are all different and yet the same!)
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HSIE Stage 1 Cultures - Languages spoken by other groups and families (OR we are all different and yet the same!)
Teaching resource for HSIE K-6 Syllabus, Learning outcomes CUS1.3 & CUS 1.4.



A typical public school in the Inner West of Sydney has upwards of 50% students from a non-English speaking background. Languages range from Chinese, Korean, Italian, Indian, Arabic, and Greek to name a few. This can lead to a rich cultural exchange within the classroom. The point is to teach children to learn about and respect diverse cultures and languages. Children should appreciate the differences between cultures and also see the similarities that exist within cultures from around the world.
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Food Safari S4 Ep43

Food Safari S4 Ep43 | HSIE Stage 1 Cultures - Languages spoken by other groups and families (OR we are all different and yet the same!) | Scoop.it
Afghan - Maeve O’Meara explores the fascinating food of Afghanistan where the guest is seen as king and beautiful feasts are prepared using age-old recipes.
Smeera Carey's insight:

Food, culture and language go hand in hand. SBS’s Food Safari series is excellent as it incorporates culture as well as discussing special recipes from different regions of the world. I chose the episode on Afghan food as stories about Afghanistan have been constantly in the news for the past decade or so and many Afghans have migrated to Australia, some as refugees, whose children would be attending public schools. It is important for children to view positive images of people from other countries and Food Safari celebrates the cultural melting pot that is modern day Australia.

The programme shows a lady in traditional head covering cooking food as well as a man with an Afghani accent who moved to Australia at the age of 16 and now bakes traditional bread.

The programme highlights cultural events such as weddings and special food that is served for such occasions.  The foods are dentified by their Afghani names.

SBS provide closed captions for all their programmes which is beneficial for any hearing impaired child, as well as for the entire class to assist in word recognition and literacy.

The programme can be a catalyst for a number of activities.The class can discuss what recipes they were most attracted to and whether they had come across similar food from their own experiences. They could then work in pairs to create their own recipe cards. The class could copy a recipe from the show such as making bread, entailing careful measurement of the  flour, the yeast, water and salt. An excursion could be planned to a restaurant to see the food being cooked and to sample the taste. This could be consolidated by writing a journal entry about the Afghan food experience.

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The emu went walking virtual book - State Library of Queensland

Smeera Carey's insight:

This resource lends itself to the teaching of literacy, history and geography subject areas and also takes into account some of the eight Aboriginal ways of learning.

The book is one of a series of digital resources offered by the State Library of Queensland and is, “a story from the Gunggari people of South East Queensland,” written by Irene Ryder and illustrated by Del Mailman.

It is a short story that can assist in raising awareness within your classroom of one of Australia’s many indigenous languages. It features vibrant pictures and some words from the Gunggari language, along with a audio recording to listen to as it moves through the pages. It contains a phonetics guide and a word list at the end that children can practise pronunciation with. The subject matter, Australian animals, is one that Stage 1 children can relate to as a majority of children are likely to have are come across them in the wild, at a zoo, or through television.

The class could brainstorm other indigenous words and the teacher might lead a discussion on the number of indigenous languages in Australia. Students from that backgroundmight be able to suggest other words and phrases. Maps of indigenous languages in Australia are readily available on the web and the children could find out what languages are spoken all over Australia and then what is spoken in their locality. For instance, the original inhabitants of the land that now makes up the Inner West of Sydney were the Cadigal and Wangal people who spoke Darug (which means ‘Yam’) and one of the main thorough ways across this region is called Parramatta (‘Eel water’) Road.

The teacher could set an open ended task for students to demonstrate what they have understood. This should take into account differing ability levels and learning styles in the classroom. An example task might be to write and illustrate a story about encountering animals on an actual or imagined journey anywhere in Australia. The children might refer to the map to decide what area to pick, research different terrains, flora and fauna, and find out what language is spoken by the indigenous people in that region.

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Birthday Wishes in Many Languages

Global birthday greetings from GlobalSchoolNet.org http://www.globalschoolnet.org Birthday wishes from all over the world in many different languages, delive...
Smeera Carey's insight:

At the risk of making a blanket statement, it is usually accepted that all children love birthdays! This video shows people from around the world saying Happy Birthday and blowing out a candle on a cake. The languages are different but the sentiment is the same.

The Stage 1 students could watch and identify the various languages within the film, and state if and how any language is relevant to them.  They could also discuss the relevance of the background icons from the country represented (eg. Great Wall of China, the Eiffel Tower and so on) and the teacher should lead a discussion on stereotypical images. The students could share any experiences they may have of that country in the form of a ‘show and tell’ presentation.

A follow on activity would be for each child to design a Happy Birthday card or poster which contains a photo of the child celebrating their birthday with their family or carers, and featuring a translation of Happy Birthday in their own language. To enforce the global perspective these should be displayed around a world map on the wall. Having their own photo and artwork on the wall would promote a sense of belonging within the classroom as photos are typically displayed in the home.

This activity lends itself to Stage 1 Mathematics outcomes too as strategies such as estimation, pie charts, fractions and percentages could be used to represent how many children are from each different country and/or how many languages are spoken.

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sunrises.pdf

Smeera Carey's insight:

This is an excellent comprehensive resource which is exactly in line with the outcomes for HSIE, CUS1.3 and CUS 1.4. It contains teachers notes and background information, a teaching programme, student worksheets and student work samples. As well as being valuable in itself, this resource can also serve as a template on how to explore other cultures as well as that of Japan.

 

It deals with stereotypical aspects of the Japanese language and culture and how to move away from them in order to appreciate the breadth of Japan's culture holistically. The guide contains references to other resources and readings to expand both the teacher and students’ knowledge of the subject matter.

 

There is a good lesson plan on the topic of Greetings, gestures and languages which suggests that students begin by brainstorming greetings, what greetings are and how they are conducted, discussing their own backgrounds and greetings in the process. The site provides word cards for common Japanese greetings and also illustrates gestures. The children could conduct a role play of formal and informal Australian greetings (shaking hands and saying ‘hello, how are you”) followed by Japanese formal and informal greetings where the participants bow down to each other and say “konnichi wa.” The class could match pictures of words with gestures and display them in the classroom to show they have understood the lesson.  The site suggests an extension activity to look for images of Japan on a computer and draw, paint or make a Japanese object.

 

A pre-service or newly qualified teacher could trial this resource and reflect on whether the lesson plan went as well as expected in reality or whether it needed to be tweaked in line with the needs of the children in that particular classroom.

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ICDL - International Children's Digital Library

ICDL - International Children's Digital Library | HSIE Stage 1 Cultures - Languages spoken by other groups and families (OR we are all different and yet the same!) | Scoop.it
International Children's Digital Library
Smeera Carey's insight:

This website excites me!

This free digital library offers a huge range of books many of which can be read in two or more languages. The simple search function includes categories such as age-range, language, fiction, non-fiction, award-winning, and genres.

I looked at ‘Listen to my Body’ (Noni, 2010, 2nd Ed, Pratham Books) which is available in English, Kannada, Telugu, Tamil and Urdu. This would be an ideal book to introduce to Stage 1 students studying cultures and languages as the illustrations represent a girl from the Indian Subcontinent wearing clothing and mentioning food from that region. The Urdu version is interesting to explore with children as not only does it show the Urdu writing script which reads from right to left, the cover is also on the ‘back’ of the book which is the Urdu ‘front.’

The site offers ‘exhibitions’ which are small collections of books with the same theme, one of which is  Celebrating Differences.

The site has many resources including a Teacher Training manual and suggests activities such as a scavenger hunt and completing a story board. For instance, the class can read and discuss the first half of the book as a group and discuss what might happen next. They could then complete the story individually using the story board.

As well as being relevant to the HSIE curriculum, this site can be used for the English K-6 Syllabus 1998 Stage 1 outcomes in Reading and Writing.

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