HSIE Stage 1: Aboriginal people's relationship to the land
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Teacher Resources - Creative Spirits Poetry

Teacher Resources - Creative Spirits Poetry | HSIE Stage 1: Aboriginal people's relationship to the land | Scoop.it
Take a look beyond the stereotypes and discover what Aboriginal life is like today - from arts and land to sport and spirituality.
Kobe Davis's insight:

This website is a great resource for teacher who are teaching all different facets of Aboriginal culture. In particular I have chosen to focus on Aboriginal Poetry. Many of these poems are based around the relationship Aboriginal people have with their land.

 

Some of these poems also have audio that go along with them to complement the written words. They are spoken by Aboriginal people and also feature Aboriginal music.

 

One example of poetry that links directly with ENS1.5 (recognises Aboriginal peoples’ special relationship with the land) and CUS1.3 (explains ways in which family members learn from each other about customs and traditions, eg Dreaming stories) is the poem Moonthanguddi http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/arts/moonthanguddi. This poem describes how the land used to be and how Aboriginal people lived peacefully together in unison.

 

This would be a great start off point to discuss with the students what the land used to be like before settlers arrived and how it was that Aboriginal people used to survive without many of the things we have today.

 

As an activity students are split into small groups of 3-4 and asked to come up with some actions to go with the poem. Ideally this lesson could be led by an Elder or Aboriginal community member so it is culturally appropriate.

 

Reference

Creative Spirits. (2014). Aboriginal Poems. Retrieved April 8, 2014 from

http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/arts/aboriginal-poems/

 

Creative Spirits. (2013). Moonthanguddi. Retrieved April 8, 2014 from
http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/arts/moonthanguddi

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The Rainbow Serpent - YouTube

Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories, Story by Dick Roughsey, Narrration by David Gulpilil, Soundtrack by Andrew Vial Photographed and edited by Alexander Cochran, A...

Kobe Davis's insight:

This resource is a video that tells the story of 'The Rainbow Serpent'. The reason I chose this video in particular is that it is narrated by well known Aboriginal Actor David Gulpilil.  This video shows beautifully drawn Aboriginal Artworks that are taken from the book 'The Rainbow Serpent'. It is important as a teacher to use authentic teaching materials and I believe this video is a perfect example of this.

 

This video tells the story how once upon a time earth was barren and featureless before the rainbow serpent came along from underneath the earth and created all of our mountains, lakes and rivers.

 

The Rainbow Serpent is significant to Aboriginal people and plays a key role in many stories, and traditional art. Students can watch this video to learn about The Dreaming and its part in Aboriginal People's relationship to the land (CUS1.3).

 

After viewing the video, students can create draw a scene from the story and write a paragraph on what is happening in that scene (CUS1.3). A group activity to complement this would be ‘sorting out the story’. Students must put pieces of cut up paper containing major scenes from the video in chronological order. This activity not only encourages students to listen carefully to the story, it also reiterates what they have heard.

 

As a further learning activity, students are given free time to explore the 'Dust Echos' website which has a range of animated Dreamtime stories. These stories have a contemporary feel which may also appeal to students. This website also has valuable teaching materials that go along with each story.  This contains the story in written format and numerous lesson ideas.

 

References

 

ABC. (2007). Dust Echos. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from
http://www.abc.net.au/dustechoes/dustEchoesFlash.htm

 

You Tube. (2011). The Rainbow Serpent. Retrieved April 7, 2014 from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vh6moD9ZOU

 

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Aboriginal heritage at Sydney’s Botanic Gardens - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia

Aboriginal heritage at Sydney’s Botanic Gardens - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia | HSIE Stage 1: Aboriginal people's relationship to the land | Scoop.it
Kobe Davis's insight:

The Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney is an excellent excursion idea for students learning about Aboriginal people's relationship to the land. Where possible, they are lead by Aboriginal education officers who have a wealth of knowledge in areas such as identifying "plants that Aboriginal people have used for food, tools and weapons and provide an Indigenous perspective on living with, and from, the native bushland" (The Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust, n.d. para. 10).

 

This experience will assist students in building a greater understanding through visual stimulus of what type of vegetation existed in the area approximately 200 years ago. The First farm display which shows an example of a early European farming practice will show the contrast between the European settlers and the traditional Aboriginal inhabitants.

 

To reinforce students knowledge about what they have learnt on the excursion, they could complete a worksheet throughout the day that will have blank areas to fill in and places to draw some of the items that they have observed. (ENS1.6)

 

As a project, students could write a narrative discussing what a regular day would entail for Indigenous Australians for example, gathering food from the land, identifying some ways that they Indigenous people depended on the land to survive (ENS1.6).

 

References

 

The Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust. (2014). Aboriginal heritage at Sydney's botanic gardens.  Retrieved April 7, 2014 from

http://www.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/welcome/quick_links/aboriginal_heritage

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My Country by Ezekiel Kwaymullina

Kobe Davis's insight:

'My Country'  by Ezekiel Kwaymullina is an fantastic resource for Stage 1 students. The story revolves around a little girl who is free to roam on land, sea and in the sky. It is a celebration of the land. It is a highly visual book that will draw the students in with its colourful pictures. The book reflects the close relationship that Aboriginal people have with their land and encourages students to think closely about what they love about their land.

 

Using this text in the classroom, the teacher could start by asking students to predict what they think the text is about from looking at the cover.  After reading the book as a group, students can think about what their favourite place in Australia is, demonstrated in this You Tube clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHYrms4qjCk. A great way to do this would be think, pair and share. There are many benefits to this strategy for it enables "them to formulate individual ideas and share these ideas with another student" (Saskatoon Public Schools, 2009, para 1) and it also encourages participation.

 

A follow up activity after the pair and share would be to jointly construct  a word bank of all the students favourite places. Students can then draw or paint their favourite place. To achieve outcome ENS1.5, the teacher could discuss the difference between their subject matter and the favourite places in the book to reiterate the special relationship Aboriginal people had with their land.

 

References

 

Cockburn Libraries. (2011). Storytime with Sally Morgan and Blaze Kwaymullina. Retrieved April 8, 2014 from
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHYrms4qjCk

 

Kwaymulli, E. (2011). My country. Sydney: Fremantle Press

 

Saskatoon Public Schools. (2009). Instructional strategies online. Retrieved April 8, 2014 from
http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/De/PD/instr/strats/think/

 

 

 

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The Native People of America

The Native People of America | HSIE Stage 1: Aboriginal people's relationship to the land | Scoop.it
Kobe Davis's insight:

This website shares a wealth of information about Native People of America who have shared a similar experience as Indigenous Australians. The information on this website will give students a global perspective on the relationship to Indigenous people and their land. One particular aspect of interest for students are the similarities that Indigenous Australians and Native People of America have in regards to beliefs about land and also the loss of land experienced by both groups.

 

For a group project, students use this website to gather information students to complete a comparison chart that compares Native People of America and Indigenous Australians, focusing on areas such as: environment, customs, food, and housing, beliefs about the land, arrival of explorers, colonisation, and current land ownership. This activity teaches students about the customs, practices and traditions of these two groups and compares their similarities (CUS1.4).

 

Using the information they have gathered from their comparison chart, students complete an artwork, choosing one subject eg. Housing. The paper has a line down the middle and each side has to represent each of the different culture. Eg. One side has food that the Native People of America would eat and the other side would show a typical meal of the Indigenous Australians (CUS1.4).

 

References

 

History Learning Site. (2013). The native people of America. Retrieved April 5, 2014 from
http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/native_people_of_america.htm

 

 

 

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