HSIE outcome SSS1.8
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HSIE outcome SSS1.8
Roles and responsibilities within families, schools & the local community & determines ways in which they should interact with others
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Teaching activities | Global Education

Teaching activities | Global Education | HSIE outcome SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
Paris Esposito's insight:

Global Education is a reliable and informative website that provides teaching resources across the entire curriculum based on a global perspective. This is an optimum resource encouraging students to develop a deep understanding of the world and use this knowledge to enable them to participate in shaping a better, shared future for the world. Within this website is a resource gallery providing meaningful and rich resources such as 'Who are the families of the world?' This resource is appropriately suited to stage one, focusing on human rights and provides students with the opportunity to examine and appreciate the diverse roles in families across the world and how they have developed and changed overtime.

Marsh (2008) highlights that resources, which explore a global perspective "enable students to travel vicariously to other times and places. They add important dimensions to student learning and, in the process, provide further opportunities for students to develop listening, speaking, writing and reading skills” (p.34).

 

The further opportunities that Marsh (2008) refers to are evident through a variety of possible lesson plans that can be implemented around this teaching resource. For example, the students can examine the varying roles carried out by family members around the world by comparing some of the texts and images provided on the website. Students can be encouraged to choose one text or image and create a van diagram making explicit the similarities and differences between the jobs that their family completes in comparison to the jobs undertaken by the family in their chosen resource. This activity would be engaging for all students as they shift from an egocentric thinking to a global understanding of roles in families around the world. 

 

In addition, another opportunity to incorporate this teaching resource into a stage one classroom could be achieved by the educator selecting a variety of texts from this website that represent numerous cultures and integrate them with reading time/groups. For example, each reading group could focus on a different country, explore their trends, gain an understanding of their unique family structures and how this impacts upon their roles and responsibilities in their homes. This knowledge can be shared with the rest of the class.

 

Moreover, Forsyth (2006) points out that teaching resources similar to Global Education help students in "making choices and questioning the way the world operates and so is an integral part of citizenship and social education." Ultimately this enables humanity to make choices in their many roles including as students and global citizens.

 

 

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Forsyth, A.P. (2006). Constructing social education curriculum for the twenty-first century: The role and importance of economics education, AARE, Parramatta NSW.

 

Marsh, (2008). Studies of society and environment : exploring teaching possibilities. French Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education Australia. 5th edition. Chapter 2 : Planning for learning. Retrieved on March 20, 2013 from Sydney University Library website

http://ereserve.library.usyd.edu.au.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/fisher/MarshStudies2008Ch2.pdf

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caringplace.pdf

Paris Esposito's insight:

Caring for Place – Caring for Country is a teacher's booklet jointly collaborated by the Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate and the NSW Department of Education and Training. It focuses on contemporary Aboriginal culture, values, heritage and connection to the land and how they impact upon their roles and responsibilities within their community and country. Caring for Place – Caring for Country is a vital resource to be included into a stage one classroom as Ruth Reynolds (2012) emphasises that too often Aboriginal perspective is ignored which "exacerbates cultural stereotypes" (p.219) and leads to greater isolation and disengagement.

 

Whilst this resource can be accessed, understood and taught by all educators the significance of involving Indigenous community members into the school environment to teach students about their culture must not be undermined. Reynolds (2012) states there is something powerful when "teaching of culture is done by the community within the community (p.219). This can be explained as research by Reynolds (2002) suggests many educators "interpret Indigenous culture through our own cultural lens" (p.220)  leading to a misunderstanding and misinterpretation. As a consequence of this all educators should pay particular attention to page nine and ten of this resource as they describe the effective consultation and optimum protocols when working with Aboriginal communities.

In accordance with this an activity that links HSIE to literacy could be to invite a local Aboriginal Elder or community member into the class to define kinship and their role and responsibilities to the land. Students can then write and draw an illustration based on a personal environmental promise that reflects the values of the Indigenous responsibility to the land. This can be accompanied by worksheet 14 within this teaching resource where students identify ways that the land has been used by Aboriginal people to meet their needs and in turn examine ways that roles and responsibilities can vary amongst cultures.

 

 

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Reynolds (2012). Teaching history, geography and SOSE in the primary school. South Melbourne, Vic : Oxford University Press.

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s1_getalong.pdf

Paris Esposito's insight:

This curriculum support document is collaborated by the NSW Government Education and Training and provides teachers with rich and engaging lesson plans. Marsh (2008) states that this document “provides detailed guidelines on outcomes, learning experiences and forms of assessment” (p.25) which is key to successful planning. 

Personally one of the most appealing aspects of this document is its reference to the quality children's literature 'The Boss' by Allan Baillie. 'The Boss' is effective in helping young students to explore the roles and responsibilities of a young bossy child and how his actions impact his family and the local community. Research by Marsh (2008) emphasises that this form of text is beneficial as it provides a “smooth transistion from what the students know and what they have already studied” (Marsh, 2008, p.35). 

In addition it provides educators with the opportunity to encourage students to critically reflect on the roles and responsibilities of family members in the story and compare these to their own roles and responsibilities within their home. Overall, it is effective in helping to reaffirm the influence that an indivduals roles and responsibilities can have on those around them.

 

An idea of a possible formal assessment task could be providing all stage one students with the opportunity to either list or create a collage of illustrations of their roles and responsibilities within their home at different stages of their life. For instance, by dividing the students worksheet into two separate sections they can compare their roles and responsibilities from when they were a young child, around the age of one or two to their present lives. This activity will help students to recognise the similarities and differences in their roles and responsibilities and make evident their increased independence with age. In turn, this activity provides educators with the chance to comprehend each students level of understanding on roles and responsibilities in the home. 

 

 

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Marsh, (2008). Studies of society and environment : exploring teaching possibilities. French Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education Australia. 5th edition. Chapter 2 : Planning for learning. Retrieved on March 20, 2013 from Sydney University Library website

http://ereserve.library.usyd.edu.au.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/fisher/MarshStudies2008Ch2.pdf

 

 

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Community Helpers - GRADE 1

A review of community helper titles and descriptions for 1st graders
Paris Esposito's insight:

'Community Helpers' YouTube video is an appropriate resource for teachers to use in their stage one classroom. The video provides basic information about various community workers that children are familiar with and interact with in their home, school and local community. In a stage one classroom this resource is particularly useful as it encourages visual learning helping to meet the diverse learning needs of students. Moreover the simplicity of this resource provides educators with great flexibility when implementing it into their classroom lessons. Chapin and Messick (2002) highlight the benefit of working with resources that provide flexibility as they allow the opportunity for teachers to personalise their planning and have "the potential to be exciting and fulfilling for the students and targeted especially so as to develop students to their highest potential” (p.49)

 

An idea of a lesson that could be based around this YouTube video is to construct a class map of the local school community, using simple Mathematical dimensions and encouraging the students to brainstorm the important artifacts in their wider school community, for example, a hospital, police station, shopping centre and/ or petrol station. As students mention important places the teacher should draw them on the map. Once everyone is satisfied with their local wider school community the class should discuss the type of people that work in each important place, and how significant their roles and responsibilities are. Students can then explore what the community would be like if some of these important people or places were taken out of the community and the impact it would have on their lives. Students should working independently and focus on one important community place and member previously discussed and on a template provided by the teacher and create an illustration of the community member and list their significant role in society. Through completing a simple learning task like this students are encouraged to be less egocentric and gain a greater awareness of the roles and responsibilities of people in their wider community. In addition, this lesson idea effectively links HSIE to other key learning areas such as Mathematics by meeting the area outcome MS1.2 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p.22). and the English outcome WS1.9 (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p.19). 

 

 

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Board of Studies NSW (2007). K-6 English Syllabus. Retrieved on March 19, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/english/k6_english_syl.pdf

 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). K-6 Mathematics Syllabus. Retrieved on March 19, 2013 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/maths/k6_maths_syl.pdf

 

Chapin J. R., & Messick R. G. (2002). Elementary social studies (A practical guide). New Jersey: A Person Education Company

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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | HSIE outcome SSS1.8 | Scoop.it
Paris Esposito's insight:

Difference Differently is a free website for teachers and students encouraging a meaningful and deep intercultural understanding. It includes a range of engaging videos, forums, quizzes and interactive learning activities, which promote both a global perspectives and metacognitive reflection.

This website is generally used for older primary students however is useful when exploring the HSIE outcome SSS1.8 as it includes a section called 'Many Voices'. In this specific section there is a teaching resource that provides stage one students with the opportunity to take on the role as the Manager of Community Services for the local council. In this role students must reflect on the needs and wants of the local community and decide on a way to effectively meet the needs of as many different groups and people in the community as possible. This is a great activity that highlights the importance of not only reflecting on our own needs and wants but also considering the needs and wants of the local community. 

An idea of a lesson that can be completed by the stage one students before engaging with the interactive game 'Many Voices' could be to explore the differences between needs and wants. Students can also reflect upon their own needs and wants by constructing a list of at least five needs and five wants supported by illustrations. This activity is supported by research from Alleman and Brophy (2010) who state exploring needs and wants are "cultural universals" (p.6) which link closely with indivudal children's worlds whilst providing opportunities to link to other children's worlds. Hence, the resource Difference Differently helps to support the academic development of diverse students through linking their personal experiences to classroom content and the lives of their peers. 

 

 

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Alleman, J. & Brophy, J. (2006). Children's Thinking About Cultural Universals. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc, Publishers.

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