HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups.
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HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups.
Celebrations and major customs of Australians based on their religion, cultural background and beliefs.
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Australia Day Reflections | Kids Speak

Australia Day Reflections | Kids Speak | HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups. | Scoop.it
3/4GB have been learning about Australia Day. We watched a video of people reflecting on what Australia Day means to them. You can watch the video
Tim Olazo's insight:

Kidspeak is a blogsite from a Year 3/4 class on a contemporary learning journey about major customs and celebrations in Australia. This resource is effective for teachers when observing the different and similar thoughts on a mutual topic of 'Australia Day' of a diverse range of stage 2 students in the same community. This website contains a video directly from Stage 2 students reflecting their thoughts on what Australia Day means to them. Towards the end of learning about the diversity of groups within and between communities in the CUS2.3 and CUS2.4 outcomes, a teacher may do something similar and also create a video to show during the school assembly, which portrays students answering questions based on “Australia Day” such as:

What did you do to celebrate Australia Day?Why do you like Australia?Do you like Australia Day as it is or should it be changed?

By doing this, it provides an open gap for students to improve their literacy skills by using their thinking skills and also will improve their confidence on talking and listening by answering the questions. Jones (1996) states that children are sometimes bursting with important ideas to tell teachers but find it difficult to interrupt teachers. For this reason questioning children will help release ideas and suggestions. This is effective because the students will also be encouraged to hear from there peers perspectives.

 

To follow up with this activity, the teachers can also assess students by creating an open discussion about what they have learnt and what they think about diversity within and between their communities. Furthermore this is an excellent opportunity for teachers to delve into the students’ metacognition and understanding of the topic area given. Moreover it provides the students an opportunity to express their feelings and students can also develop skills of reflecting and classifying information from their very own experiences of celebrating Australia Day with their families and friends. This website helps teachers to have a better way to plan lessons and activities based on Australia Day and other major customs, events and celebrations that Australia follows.

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Aimee Gale's comment, April 29, 2013 4:58 AM
Thanks for sharing my class blog. I hope it was helpful. Aimee
Tim Olazo's comment, April 30, 2013 11:05 PM
yeah it was actually very helpful and awesome to watch!
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Events - National Sorry Day Committee

Events - National Sorry Day Committee | HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups. | Scoop.it
Tim Olazo's insight:

National Sorry Day is an annual day of commemoration and remembrance of all those who have been impacted by the government policies of forcible removal that have resulted in the Stolen Generation. This site is a great tool for future and current teachers to access, as it highlights a great amount of information that explains the purpose and how schools can help to participate in this significant event “National Sorry Day”. The objectives of this website is to help inform teachers on how they can hold culturally appropriate and engaging events that mark National Sorry Day and the Anniversary of the Apology. In addition, to help teachers adapt to changes brought about by the Australian Curriculums History curriculums regarding new opportunities to teach the history of the Stolen Generations. Moreover to keep teachers abreast of the evolution of the Australian Curriculum in the context of the teaching of the history of the Stolen Generations and of the Australian Curriculum's Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures cross curriculum priority. Understanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures provide opportunities for learners to deepen their knowledge about Australia and thus enrich their ability to participate positively in the ongoing development of Australia (ACARA, 2011)

 

 

This website is beneficial for the students learning in relation to aspects of the Australian History and why Australia celebrates “National Sorry Day”. For this reason a teaching strategy can include, inviting members of the National sorry day committee (NSDC) or the local Aboriginal elders to educate the students and to share the purpose and meaning of “National Sorry Day”. In relation to this invitation it allows teachers to implement literacy based on talking and listening and writing. However before the arrival of the visitor, the teachers are to tell their students that they will be given an assessment afterwards. This will enable students to use their higher order thinking skills to grasp the knowledge that is being spoken to them, which also enables the students to listen attentively rather than to talk to their friends. To assess the children’s learning outcomes, the teacher will ask students to write a recount about what they’ve learnt? And why we celebrate National Sorry Day. For this reason it gives the students an opportunity to write in different text types and to assess their ability to express what they’ve grasped from the visitor. Winch (2010) stated that assessment is the process of identifying, gathering and interpreting information about students’ learning.

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Chinese New Year Celebrations Bring Profits to Australia | .TR

Chinese New Year Celebrations Bring Profits to Australia | .TR | HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups. | Scoop.it
Australian tourism industry benefits from the Chines new year celebrations.
Tim Olazo's insight:

This article is an excellent tool for teachers in embedding an Asian perspective in the classroom, as it formerly discusses the impact that Chinese New Year has in Australia based on funding, tourism, and growth of population and appreciation of the country. This article presents many ways as to how classrooms can recognize this global celebration all around the world. Implementing this resource as an activity I would use both Chinese calendars and the Australian (Gregorian) calendar and ask the students to compare and contrast the differences between the dates of the New Year celebrations (linking to numeracy). In addition, students will locate the year they were born on a Chinese zodiac chart and decide if the characteristics of the animals are an accurate portrayal of their personalities, this activity will also be assessed. Hollins (1996) stated that effective teachers make linkages between students’ home culture and classroom practices even when the students are non-members of the mainstream group

 

Furthermore explain to children that different groups of people celebrate different holidays. Talk to them about the New Year's holiday that we just celebrated (Jan. 1). Show the students where China is on a map or a globe, which can also implement geographical lessons in the classroom. Briefly describe how ancient Chinese used a lunar calendar so the New Year that they celebrate is at a different time, and then explain to the children how they determine the date of the New Year. Furthermore share information about the history of this holiday and some of its traditions. However make sure to tell them the holiday is celebrated globally and not just in China or Australia. For this reason the teachers are to assess the students’ prior knowledge by checking for understanding with questioning and review information as needed and to ask children to write something that they have learned in their journals which also relates to literacy in writing different text types. 

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The ANZAC Day tradition | Australian War Memorial

The ANZAC Day tradition | Australian War Memorial | HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups. | Scoop.it
Tim Olazo's insight:

The Australian War Memorial online website aims to assist student learners to remember, interpret and understand the Australian experience of war and its ongoing effect on Australian society. It offers teachers with pedagogical teaching strategies to teach Australian History and Australian War to the classroom for all students. In relation to the subject matter: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups there are many teaching activities that can link with the ANZAC Day tradition within this focus strand. For example, through the use of the online educational resources, children are able to receive a memorial box each containing artifacts that students can handle, as well as photographs, case studies, uniforms, a video, oral histories, teacher’s notes, and more. These creative enquiry-based programs enable students to adopt a hands-on approach to learning. Memorial boxes can be adapted for use across many areas of study and are accessible to a wide range of students in primary schools.

 

In addition, teachers could use these memorial boxes for stage 2, but I would be mindful that there might be a need to debrief and discuss feelings and thoughts that are provoked as a result towards critically analysing and critically thinking about what these photographs, case studies, videos and oral histories represent as a small groups then share to the whole class. This website would be good to stimulate discussion about how our society deals with certain events like ANZAC DAY. However these activities allows students to have a solid understanding in learning the importance and reason to why we celebrate ANZAC DAY. Moreover to assess this activity, the teacher can create a whole class discussion based on “ANZAC DAY”, by doing this, teachers are able to gain prior knowledge and information, as their students reflect and draw upon what they have learnt during the course of the memorial box activities. Moreover teachers can also link these activities to literacy by decoding text through the use of case studies and also link it to numeracy by using timelines and numbers in identifying dates and years of the photographs provided. Callow (1999) states that images are very important parts of the culture in which we live in and that all visual texts are influenced by the cultures, values, ideologies and worldviews in and through which they are created and consumed.

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Who will you be talking about this Harmony Day?

Who will you be talking about this Harmony Day? | HSIE: Major customs and celebrations of religious and other community groups. | Scoop.it
This Harmony Day, 21 March 2013, the International Fund for Animal Welfare would like to recognise and applaud all those Australians who care and offer protection to individual animals, entire populations and precious habitats within our great...
Tim Olazo's insight:

The Harmony Day website consists of many educational resources that enables schools, students and teachers to be involved and to help spread the awareness and about the importance of this day. Harmony Day is a day of cultural respect for everyone who calls Australia home, from the traditional owners of this land to those who have come from many countries around the world. By participating in Harmony Day activities, students can learn and understand how all Australians from diverse backgrounds equally belong to this nation and enrich it. Furthermore the website portrays that, it is a day of cultural respect, widely celebrated across schools, childcare centres, community groups, churches, businesses and federal, state and local government agencies.

 

In addition, a teaching idea for the topic of Harmony Day can begin with open-ended questions such as “What is diversity?” What are some of the ways that people can be different from each other? What things make us the same? By doing this it provides an opportunity for teachers to discuss the issues of racial vilification and actions that can occur in the classrooms. For this reason teachers can implement strategies to inform students about no tolerance of racism. Kounin (1970), states that an effective way to secure information from students is to continuously draw them towards the topic that is being taught and reflecting back towards them by asking questions and to demonstrate some aspects of what they learnt. To further extend this activity the teacher could possibly allow students to work in groups and ask their bilingual classmate to teach them how to count to 10 in their other language. However if there are not many bilingual students in the classroom, teachers can take students to the computer lab to research and learn how to count from 1-10 in another language verbally or non-verbally i.e. sign language. In assessing the students, the teacher will give the students a take home task and ask students to write up a speech which links to literacy based on writing text, of no more than 3 minutes to present an oral speech about the people in their family and their heritage and one thing they do differently in comparison to Australians (i.e. food, sports, dance). For this reason, presenting there speech to the whole class will enable teachers and students to gain a better perspective about their fellow peers and friends, based on their cultural background and race.

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