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games-based-learning blog: Quick Guide to Developing a Learning Simulation

games-based-learning blog: Quick Guide to Developing a Learning Simulation | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Simulation games provide an effective way to address real life issues, especially in HSIE or social studies. This blog has practical advice on how to develop an online learning simulation. I am yet to try it but would love to hear from others who have developed simulation games to teach primary students about current events or issues.

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HSIE K-6
Engaging HSIE resources for primary teachers
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K-6 Educational Resources :: Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

K-6 Educational Resources :: Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

Locate the K-6 HSIE Syllabus and other resources on the NSW Board of Studies website. Locate information and advice on the implementation of the Australian curriculum in NSW on this website as well.

 

 

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Years 5-6 Indonesian: Reduce Reuse Recycle Compost | Asia Education Foundation

Years 5-6 Indonesian: Reduce Reuse Recycle Compost | Asia Education Foundation | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
This learning sequence examines the waste management strategies of reducing, reusing, recycling and composting.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

These excellent teaching resources focus on a current issue and help students learn Indonesian at the same time.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 1:12 AM

Teaching language and culture through a global issue.

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A Must Have Rubric for Problem Based Learning (adaptable for HSIE K-6)

A Must Have Rubric for Problem Based Learning (adaptable for HSIE K-6) | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

"Project based learning is a teaching learning methodology that has been widely praised for its efficacy in enhancing learning achievements.The premise underlying PBL revolves around  getting students engaged in authentic learning events through the integration of mini-projects in class. These projects can be as short as one day and as long as a year. However, there is a difference between mere projects and project based learning. This table from Teachbytes provides a great illustration of the nuances between the two concepts."


Via John Evans
Catherine Smyth's insight:

A handy rubric that can be adapted for HSIE K-6 problem-based learning projects.

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Mikko Hakala's curator insight, June 1, 11:44 AM

Excellent table reminding about the difference between projects and project based learning. Projects are too easily assigned as exercises to students, without paying attention to the issues on the right hand side of this table.

 

Pin it for later: http://www.pinterest.com/pin/318981586080452762/

 

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National Museum of Australia - Symbols of Australia

National Museum of Australia - Symbols of Australia | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

Drawn from the collection of the National Museum of Australia, the Symbols of Australia exhibition explored some of the symbols Australians have chosen to represent themselves and their nation.


Via Georgie Carter
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Georgie Carter's curator insight, April 13, 7:25 AM

A national symbol is a symbol of any entity considering itself and manifesting itself to the world as a national community. It is important for students to understand the purpose of symbols and how they are used to convey meaning and become recognised as part of our identity. By identifying with Australian symbols and their significance in being Australian, students feel “a sense of personal power” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2014).

 

The Symbols of Australia collection shows how Australian is represented by different symbols. Students can explore concepts such as national identity, culture, values and history through the online images in this collection.

 

Teaching Idea:

Before visiting the Symbols of Australia exhibition, ask students what they think a symbol might be and to give examples of symbols they may already know (such as a students’ school uniform or logo, or a sporting club symbol). By drawing upon examples from student’s prior knowledge of symbols in their own environment, it heightens their engagement as it makes the content relatable (Clay, 1991). Following this, ask the students to build on these ideas by suggesting symbols that might be used to represent Australia.

 

Introduce the class to the Symbols of Australia exhibition using the interactive whiteboard. Enable students to identify with formal and informal symbols of Australia. Encourage students to consider what aspects of our national identity are these symbols are representing and what does this say about the Australian way of life; also consider how they came to symbolise these aspects.

 

Class Activity:

Divide the class into small groups; allocate each group one symbol from the exhibition. Ask each group to examine their symbol and discuss what it says about Australia. Groups may use the exhibition and additional resources such as The Australian Government website:

 

http://www.australia.gov.au/topics/australian-facts-and-figures/national-symbols

 

Each group must report on their symbols by explaining to the class what aspect of Australia they think the symbols represent; how the symbol is portrayed in different ways; and what it tells us about ourselves as Australians, i.e. the things that are important to us as a nation.

 

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Long Journey - Young lives


Via Molly Rose Ingram
Catherine Smyth's insight:

An interactive game that explores the experiences of young refugees.

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Molly Rose Ingram's curator insight, March 26, 7:20 PM

‘Long Journey, Young Lives’

 

‘Long Journey, Young Lives’ is an interactive resource that appeals to primary students and allows them to view individual’s there own age discussing their experiences as a refugee. The site compares the opinions of Australian school children to young refugees. Students are able to see the progression of the refugee journey, from homeland conflict, the journey, detention centres and reflection on their journey. The stages allow students to understand the policies in place for refugees, and relates to current issues in Australia regarding ‘boat people’.

 

Following this activity, students can discuss as a class reasons why people have to seek refuge in a different country, and discuss where they think most refugees that come to Australia are from, and reasons why. Introduce a new vocabulary to students and define words such as refugee, migration, migrant, immigrant and asylum.

 

Students can construct a diary entry text that allows them to speak from the point of view of a refugee. Students can write a draft first, receive peer feedback and edit where needed. Students will be instructed to speak in first person, and use emotive and descriptive language to engage the audience, and create empathy between reader and the writer. Students will then post their diary entry onto a class blog, allowing other students to read the journey’s of their fellow peers and also gain an understanding of how people may experience events such as this in different ways. Individuals seeking refuge is a long standing global event, and in Australia it is a current issue that is putting pressure on political figures.

 

This resource is great to use with stage 3 as it appeals to the technology driven students of today. Students can work at their own pace and listen to the refugee’s journey to their new country. Students are able to take on a role and put themselves into the shoes of a child refugee. This activity also links to the English, text and context outcome (ACELY1698). Use of effective and contemporary resources in the classroom that link to current events such as refugees allows for the study of important social issues and “also the development of the skills of participation so that students can do something about the issues…” which is essential “to prepare students to enter a democratic society” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 15).

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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5. Discover Dairy! Going from Farm to Plate

5. Discover Dairy! Going from Farm to Plate | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

Here you will find a comprehensive unit of work that clearly demonstrates all of the stages involved in the creation of Australian dairy products - from milk production on the farm to arrival at supermarkets.


Via Martin Yoon
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Martin Yoon's curator insight, April 6, 11:36 PM

This interactive website provides students with information about; dairy farming in Australia, how cows are milked, the day to day duties of dairy farmers on the farm and in the office, and how dairy farmers reduce energy use through energy-efficient water cooling systems and plant equipment. The website allows students to develop a better understanding of the nutritional benefits of milk and how it can be categorised as a 'need.' The “Milk from Farm to Plate-What’s it all About?” interactive animation is engaging for students and takes them through the process of how milk ends up in supermarkets. Students develop an awareness of how technologies, workers, users and the environment are interconnected in a process to produce milk.

 

Students develop a better understanding of the growing use of technology in dairy farming by introducing to students the term ‘robotic milking.’ Students have the opportunity to watch Winnindoo Dairy Farm in Victoria through online ‘In Dairy’ cameras to get an up close look at how this new technology is used to collect milk. When students use these multimedia simulations, animations and live camera footage of diary cows it 'affords students the opportunity to transcend the passive learner role and to take control of their learning’ (Mishra and Koehler, 2006, p.1035).

 

As a learning strategy, students can identify ways in which previous generations in local farming communities would produce bottled milk without the prevalance of todays technology. This can be through an excursion to Glenmore Gavana Holsteins Dairy Farm (NSW) which includes fun tours and information appropriate for stage one students about past and modern dairy farming.

Hence, this website is a fantastic way to explore the interconnections between technology, workers, users and the environment in an interactive and fun way. According to Marsh (2008) ‘computer technology benefits the classroom because it provides the flexibility to meet the individual needs and abilities of each student, provides students with immediate access to rich source materials beyond the school and beyond the nation, motivates and stimulates learning and enables the teachers to move from information-giver or instructor, to facilitator of learning’ (p.202-203). 

 

Reference list

Marsh, C. J. (2008). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. Australia: Frenchs Forest, Pearson Australia.

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J.(2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Teachers College Record, 18 (6), pp.1017-1054.

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Systematic thinking - Six Thinking Hats

Systematic thinking - Six Thinking Hats | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

Via Maree Whiteley
Catherine Smyth's insight:

De Bono's Six Thinking Hats help students think critically about issues in HSIE K-6.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 25, 9:57 PM

Use thinking strategies such as DeBono's Six Thinking Hats to investigate and analyse controversial issues in the classroom.

Rob Whyte's curator insight, April 14, 7:32 AM

Great for ESL writing and advanced speaking classes.

Hanieh Akbarimehr's curator insight, April 17, 2:31 AM

Star!

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▶ 5M Cameron HSIE Movie | Newington College MediaCore Library

▶ 5M Cameron HSIE Movie | Newington College MediaCore Library | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
In HSIE, This term, 5M have been looking at similarities and differences between my life and the typical life of a person from a different culture.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Great idea for an assessment task in Stage 3 HSIE K-6. Think about what Cameron needed to know to be able to produce this movie.

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Australian Citizenship

Australian Citizenship | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This is an Australian government website with online teaching resources for developing an understanding of citizenship in Australia.

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Primary - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia

Primary - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
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Fantastic Maps

Fantastic Maps | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
Great maps and beautiful places
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This entire Scoop.It site explores a range of different maps and places.

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Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day

Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
Most Australians celebrate Australia Day as the day Australia was founded.

In contrast, Aboriginal people mourn their history and call it ‘Invasion Day’.
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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, January 23, 8:23 PM

Australia Day (January 26) is a significant event in the nation's calendar but not everyone agrees on what the day represents. For some Australians, Australia Day is about national identity or national values. For others, Australia Day represents something different. This website offers an Aboriginal perspective on Australia Day.I am interested in how teachers can deal with an issue or a topic that may be controversial in the community.

 

The researchers, Barton & Levstik, argue that conflict is fundamental to democracy and that teachers should be honest with their students about both the conflict and consensus surrounding an event or an issue. Rather than closing down discussion or differences of opinion, they suggest that teachers should prepare their students for a reasoned discussion about an issue. Teachers should carefully plan and scaffold the discussion about a contentious issue.

 

The following scaffold uses some of ideas and research findings of Barton & Levstk (2005) in Doing History. Using these ideas, teachers can plan a discussion about Australia Day or any other current event:

1. Pose an inquiry question e.g. "What is Australia Day?", "How has Australia Day changed?".  As a class, come up with additional questions.

2. Prepare primary and secondary sources related to the topic (e.g. Babakiueria DVD, newspaper articles, cartoons, songs, photographs, diary entries, historical narratives etc;)

3. Do some background research. Present facts and knowledge (e.g. dates, places, people). Use a graphic organiser to organise information. For example, use a T Chart, Venn Diagram, Retrieval Chart. (Check out the free downloadable templates on Global Education http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/1840.html).

5. Provide opportuntities for small group background work around different aspects of the topic. Gather information about different perspectives about the topic. 

6. Provide time for students to form a tentative position. Students can write a positional statement using evidence they have found.

7. Allow time to discuss and think.

Royce Crittle's curator insight, March 29, 7:11 AM



This article from January 2014 highlights the historical significance of Australia day for Australians with a European background and those with an Aboriginal indigenous background. Pearson & O'Neill (2009, p.73) suggest that Australia day was formerly a celebration of British culture in Australia, but now has  adapted to include a celebration of multicultural society. There is obvious contention between an Anglo-British centered view of Australia day and a multiculturalist view. The latter argument is relevant due to the 2011 census (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2012, "media release national", Para. 1") revealing that one in four Australians is born overseas

 

This source is useful for primary school students studying the historical significance that this day holds for diverse communities. It can be particularly useful to incorporate in class discussions about how history can be interpreted. This is further supported by the use of homework questions set in the article about how students interpret the significance of the day based on what they have read. However, this is a highly controversial topic so students would have to do further research on the history of the Australian colonies and the impact that British settlement had on the indigenous people. of Australia. Such examples could be the stolen generation. This is an opportunity for students to learn about Aboriginal culture like dance, art and music. 

 

This article can be used as an in class activity as a means to explore past Australian traditions include the flag and the national anthem. Both of these play an important role in identifying Australia day as a celebration. A literacy strategy for stage 1 students could be to organise an activity around a theme of citizenship to help students better understand the contribution to Australia from other cultures in the community.

 

The information presented in this article is bias towards indigenous culture. This is unnecessary because it doesn't encourage students to think objectively but rather pushes a political agenda. This article is then perhaps slightly too advanced for stage 1 students. This means that this resource would need to be presented in a easier way so that stage 1 students could comprehend it better through the use of visuals or breaking down the arguments into basic components. 

 

This article could have better explained the European perspective with historical reference to the first fleet or colonisation as this is a significant part of Australian history. 

 

McCrone, D. & McPherson, G. (2009). National Days Constructing and Mobilising Identity. doi: 10.1057/9780230251175

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics, (2012). Census. Retrieved April 10, 2014, from http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/censushome.nsf/home/CO-59?opendocument&navpos=620

Thanh Thuong Nguyen's curator insight, April 12, 11:26 PM

Through the meaning implied in Aboriginal celebration of Survival Day, the page introduces Aboriginal perspective about the contemporary issue existing in Australia. When Australian people are celebrating Australian Day, many Aboriginal people found there is little to celebrate with the same meaning; rather, they celebrate Survival Day that implies their commemoration of a deep loss_ the loss of their rights to their land, loss of family, loss of the right to practice their culture. The source also includes Aboriginal participation by representing difference voices of Aboriginal people about the issue. The site also emphasises the account of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal history by introducing the emerging thinking in some Australians about the concept of “Arrival Day” celebration in which both Indigenous and Australian history are praised and promoted.


The source provides teachers with a different perspective from which they can design teaching activities that promote students developing different viewpoints. This is a useful resource for teachers not only in term of obtaining information to teach the concept and the origin of Australia Day, but also in term of teaching the story implied in the event viewed from an Aboriginal point of view. By applying the idea of this resource into teaching, teachers would be able to raise students’ awareness of the diversity that has been existed since the foundation of the country in which they are living, and advise them the existing discrimination that they should avoid. When carry on any teaching activities that requires students to collect data about the event from different perspective, it is crucial for teachers to provide enough guidance to students in order to avoid encountering sensitivity and offensiveness.

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CHILD LABOUR

Catherine Smyth's insight:

This short film could be used to stimulate a class discussion about child labour and the broader issue of human rights and social justice.

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Global Multidimensional Poverty Index

Global Multidimensional Poverty Index | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

"The global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) is an international measure of acute poverty covering over 100 developing countries. It complements traditional income-based poverty measures by capturing the severe deprivations that each person faces at the same time with respect to education, health and living standards."


Via Seth Dixon
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Making sense of poverty.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 20, 12:36 PM

The MPI was developed out of a desire to fill some of the gaps in the HDI's applicability and utility.  Allow me to quote the editor of one the NCGE's journals, the Geography Teacher, on the usefulness of the MPI website for classroom use: "With the infographics, maps, graphs, country briefings, and case studies, you have a ready-made lesson activities to demonstrate patterns of fertility, mortality, and health for a population unit, and access to health care, education, utilities, and sanitation for an Industrialization and Economic Development Unit. Connections can also be made to malnutrition and water, as well as to key concepts such as pattern and scale, to key geographical skills such as how to use and think about maps and geospatial data, and to the use of online maps and online data."  Also, this article from the World Bank also give a run-down on the key findings of the MPI in 2014. 


Tags: statisticspopulation, development, unit 2 population, unit 6 industry.

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, July 16, 10:49 PM

Global índice de pobreza.

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GEP Primary resources for learning and teaching

GEP Primary resources for learning and teaching | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
Engaging resources for the primary classroom to enrich learning and teaching with a global perspective.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This Scoop.It site, curated by Global Education Project Victoria, is a collection of suitable resources with a global perspective for the primary classroom.

 

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How are we connected?

Catherine Smyth's insight:

The concept of global interconnectedness is represented in a  graphic organiser and map from a teaching resource from World Vision. Concepts such as trade, international organisations, transport and communication show how we are connected socially, politically, economically and environmentally.

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Woman’s racist rant against Asian woman filmed on train from Central Coast to Sydney

Woman’s racist rant against Asian woman filmed on train from Central Coast to Sydney | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
A WOMAN has been filmed dishing out a racist rant on a peak hour train.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Racism on public transport in NSW in 2014.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, July 21, 1:15 AM

Using current issues or events to teach HSIE K-6.

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Make a Sydney Opera House collage - YouTube

Share your videos with friends, family and the world


Via Marissa Sivalingam
Catherine Smyth's insight:

How to make a national icon!

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Marissa Sivalingam's curator insight, April 7, 7:55 AM

The Sydney Opera House is one of the most iconic buildings in Sydney. It is an important asset to the community as it provides a venue for some of the best examples of the Arts that Australia has to offer and is in international icon, as well as being on the world heritage list. The video in this scoop shows how to make an Opera House collage.

 

Students will discuss famous buildings or parts of Sydney before watching the video. They will then use the video to compile a procedure as a class. Students will be provided with a range of additional art and crafts materials to decorate their opera house. After making their collages, students will individually research the Opera House. They are to find out who designed it, when it was built and how it is important to the Sydney community. They should also find out where it has played a significant role in national or international events (such as the 2000 Olympics or the 2013/2014 New Year firework display). They will then create a short paragraph reflecting information they feel is important and attach it to their collage. 

Jennifer May's curator insight, April 29, 6:55 PM

I like this idea but I'd throw in some maths - using a protractor to draw the circles on scrap paper/cardboard/newspaper, then cutting the sails out from that.  : )

 

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Earth Day: Environmental Action Projects

Earth Day: Environmental Action Projects | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
With Earth Day 2014 coming up on April 22, many schools are making plans for one-day celebrations that promote a green message. For deeper learning --and longer-term benefits for people and planet ali
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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, April 16, 7:19 PM

Planning resources and ideas for designing Project-Based Learning projects.

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Planning for teaching through inquiry - Enquiring Minds

The Enquiring Minds 'enquiry cycle' is an approach to planning and carrying out any sort of enquiry-based activity. This enquiry model can be used by teachers and students to help visualise progress on any extended activity.
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Inquiry learning is at the heart of HSIE K-6. Research suggests students produce knowledge when they investigate a situation. The challenge for primary teachers is to know how to plan effective learning activities that provide the opportunity for their students to build knowledge, develop skills and learn in an engaging way. The resources on this UK based website provide a useful planning framework that can be adapted for HSIE K-6 and the new Australian Curriculum.

 

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Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice | Teaching Tolerance

Using Photographs to Teach Social Justice | Teaching Tolerance | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
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Teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives: selecting and evaluating teaching resources

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 2, 11:36 PM

Evaluate and select curriculum resources for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective using 5 key criteria.

 

Teachers should consider:

1. Authenticity

2. Balanced nature of the presentation

3. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander participation

4. Accuracy and support

5. Exclusion of content of a secret or sacred nature.

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How toilet paper explains the world

How toilet paper explains the world | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
A country's most popular hygiene product has a lot to do with its demographics.

Via Seth Dixon
Catherine Smyth's insight:

This topic would appeal to many primary children!

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, January 21, 3:11 PM

Toilet paper, tampons, diapers and incontinence pads...however there are substitutes that some use or not.

Siri Anderson's curator insight, January 22, 8:17 AM

Middle School World Geography gem.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 14, 9:36 AM

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

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We don't accept Child Labour in Australia

so why do we in Bangladesh? Visit unicef.org.au/childlabour
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Stimulate discussion about human rights with this very short Unicef ad that highlights the issue of child labour. Compare the rights of a child in Australia with another country and explore the social systems that exist in two different countries.

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Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example

Scaffold Like an Ant- A simple scaffolding example | HSIE K-6 | Scoop.it
I am teaching a class where I allow the students a set amount of time to draw out what they know about a subject. Today, the students did their pre-class work, then came to class, and we began to d...
Catherine Smyth's insight:

Use this scaffold to plan social investigations about current issues in HSIE K-6.

 

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