HSIE Stage 3 - The influence of current events
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HSIE Stage 3 - The influence of current events
Resources for understanding different cultural influences and their contribution to Australian identities, and how cultures change through interactions with other cultures and the environment.

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Global Perspective - China Down Under

MARINA MITSINGA's insight:

China Downunder is a multistage teaching resource, developed by the NSW Department of Education and Training, to support the teaching of the HSIE K-6 Syllabus outcomes and subject matter. It provides teaching notes, handouts and background knowledge specific to each stage. Particularly, for the teaching of Stage 3, 'Theme 3: Beliefs and contributions', offers a global perspective of the influence of current events. It provides teaching/learning activities describing different cultural influences and their contributions to Australian identities. The theme provides a global perspective, outlining the influence of current events, which impacted on the Chinese culture to become part of the Australian community.

 

Activities include, instructing students to “create a list of names, attributions and actions of significant Australians”. Students discuss what they think makes an individual significant or famous in their perspective. Teachers can use the 'jigsaw strategy' to organise students into groups and have them investigate significant Chinese Australian personalities using questions, such as, ‘Where was the person born and why did he migrate to Australia?’. This activity will allow students to develop an understanding of the contribution the particular personality has made to the Australian community, and provide students with an interest in open communication and good interpersonal relations with other students in their group. According to Johnson and Johnson (2004), group members experience positive independence, where there is dual responsibility for each person to complete the task (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 148). This involves interactions in which group members encourage each other’s efforts and contribution, whilst building on others comments. It has been shown that cooperative learning in groups can enhance cognitive development and develop greater capacity among students for reflection through explanatory discussion (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 145). Finally, the jigsaw strategy also forms as a type of assessment, which helps teachers assess the ways in which students respond and analyse research questions.

 

Bibliography:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspective - The Little Red Yellow Black Website

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Perspective - The Little Red Yellow Black Website | HSIE Stage 3 - The influence of current events | Scoop.it
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This book was developed by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS), and serves as a contributory introduction to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and culture. It is written from an Indigenous perspective, and explores the themes of identity, adaption and continuity. The text discusses some of the Indigenous customs, culture and rituals and provides insights to Indigenous experiences, which are presented through photographs, festival information, art and stories. The book further includes stories on the treatment of Indigenous people under the influence of the British.

 

The text can be used as an instructional tool to pre-inform and help teachers understand the importance of embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within the classroom. Teachers can introduce this sense of identity that is presented through the concepts of land, relationships, place, time, culture, and language. Teachers can assess students’ learning by allocating per student a research project based on an Indigenous key concept that was previously explored in the class lesson. For example, a student that is assigned to the concept of place, could potentially research the sense of space, location, position and priority. Thus, students could research relevant information on their topic and return to class for peer assessment. Through peer assessment, students demonstrate an understanding of the underlying goals of task and further learn in an inquiry (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 135). Students can provide feedback to peers on work and mark them according to the criteria identified. Not only does this process improve students’ metacognitive skills, it also encourages a form of evaluation that helps students learn from others mistakes and provide them with the opportunity to build on others observations.

 

Bibliography:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Race riots spread to suburbs - National - smh.com.au

Race riots spread to suburbs - National - smh.com.au | HSIE Stage 3 - The influence of current events | Scoop.it
Racial violence erupted in several Sydney suburbs last night. -
MARINA MITSINGA's insight:

The Sydney Morning Herald newspaper article, reviews the racist mob violence that broke out in December 2005, at Cronulla Beach in Sydney. The current event involved 5000 people, who gathered to protest about prior incidents of violence, involving members of the Lebanese community and local residents. The protest escalated to a mob, where people verbally abused and physically assaulted people whom they suspected of being of Middle Eastern origin. The event was referred to as ‘un-Australian’, raising many cultural and racial issues within society. In analysis, the event could be used in Stage 3 to enrich students' knowledge on the influence of current events and make students familiar with the concepts of racism, prejudice and intolerance.

 

In a classroom setting, these concepts can be used as a teaching idea for 'national identity', to educate students about how people see themselves, their identities and what they consider to be their defining ways of life, that is, their cultures. As an introductory activity within the lesson, students could divide into small groups and unravel some terminology used in the text, discussing the negative connotations of terms such as, ‘un-Australian’, ‘stereotypes’ and ‘racism’, onto a visual poster.

 

In addition, students can also develop a role-play, to demonstrate the principles of conflict resolution. Student can replicate the real life situation of the Cronulla Riots and produce an alternative reaction, reflecting ways in which violence and racism could have been prevented. Teachers can assist in the experiential learning by identifying and developing roles, procedures, a set of rules and debriefing questions, that could engage students in simulating, observing and analysing the conflict resolution process (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 149). In the assessment task process, teachers can evaluate students’ learning of significant concepts, through role-playing, and assess how well students develop their part in the role-play process and their narrations of the issues identified in the Cronulla Riots.

 

Bibliography:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Apology to Australia's Indigenous peoples - australia.gov.au

MARINA MITSINGA's insight:

The website provides a transcript of Kevin Rudd’s apology to the Indigenous Australians in 2008. The speech acknowledged the past injustices and inequalities, particularly those of the Stolen Generations. Firstly, Rudd’s reflects on the past, as he speaks about the mistreatment of the Stolen Generation and admits that it is “a shameful event” in the Australian history. He continues by apologising for the destruction of the Aborigines culture, and for the pain and suffering of the Stolen Generations. Finally, Rudd concludes with a hope of all Australians to be equal “whatever their origin”.

 

Teachers can use the apology as a teaching resource to introduce the history of the Stolen Generations and address key concepts such as, reconciliation and recognition. Moreover, students require gaining a deeper learning of their land, their ancestors, their mob and their language. Following the history lesson, teachers need to structure learning tasks in ways that incorporate oral and written sources, making use of literacy skills to explore silences and absences in texts (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 397). Initially, the teacher can prompt students to write a written response on what they have learnt so far based on the Stolen Generations and discuss why they think this apology was executed. With completion of written task, students can demonstrate an individual oral presentation or speech in front of the class, while developing face interaction and engage in each other's knowledge. Teachers can assess students' learning and understanding through their process of how well students collected and analysed information. This teaching method will instigate students to think about their thinking, share their ideas in ways not entirely scripted by the teacher and demonstrated how they consider issues.

 

Bibliography:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Racism. No Way. Project: 'Delete Racism' video clip

Racism. No Way. Project: 'Delete Racism' video clip | HSIE Stage 3 - The influence of current events | Scoop.it
This website aims to tackle racism in schools in Australia, through providing teachers, school students, parents and governors with games, research and lesson ideas that explore the causes and effects of racism for practical use in the classroom.
MARINA MITSINGA's insight:

The ‘No Way project’, developed by the Conference of Education Systems Chief Executive Officers (2000), is a student learning resource available to teachers for teaching 'antiracism'. It is a comprehensive project offering various teaching resources, like this video, based on research into the nature of racism and how to combat it. The video presents young people promoting equality and tolerance, while recognizing and addressing racism in the learning environment. The participants define the term ‘racism’ and introduce different strategies that could improve antiracism. The video involves much singing, dancing and colourful clothing, making it appealing to the audience, particularly, for Stage 3 students.

 

This visual and audio resource could form as a visual aid for students that makes learning, fun and interactive, while fostering deeper learning. Video clips in the classroom can additionally help grab students’ attention, and at the same time; improve attitudes toward content and learning; increase understanding; and stimulate the flow of ideas (Berk, 2009, p. 2). Within the educational setting, teachers can engage students in the video to teach   about the concept of anti racism and successively, educate students about cultural influences. Students need to understand why some ways of thinking about culture are simply incorrect. Thereafter, teachers can allow students to create a mind map individually, where students could brainstorm their thoughts and ideas of the content in the video. Students can catergorise and group their ideas into related concepts, and include terminology that is unfamiliar to them. This type of assessment will assist students in enhancing and flourishing their vocabulary predominant for the learning and comprehension of antiracism. Subsequently, teachers can assess the students’ reflections and prior knowledge, which can suggest what the children already know and propose what needs to be addressed in future learning.

 

Bibliography:

Berk, R. A. (2009). Multimedia teaching with video clips: TV, movies, YouTube, and mtvU in the college classroom. International Journal of Technology in Teaching and Learning, 5(1), 1–21.

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