HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes
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Australian Election Commission Website – Student Animation – Election Day

Australian Election Commission Website – Student Animation – Election Day | HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes | Scoop.it

http://www.aec.gov.au/Education/Democracy_Rules/interactives/election_day/index.htm

Rebecca Mahar's insight:

The Election Day animation by the AEC covers when and how federal elections take place.

 

It explains to students:

-when a Federal election is called;

-the parliamentary processes involved with the issue of writs;

-timeframes for enrolment and eligibility to vote;

-timeframes and eligibility to nominate for election;

-how ballot papers are constructed;

-what happens and who is involved with Election Day; and

-who counts votes and how long it takes for a result in the House of Representatives and Senate to be called.

 

It finishes off with a short quiz and has features throughout the video to pause, discuss and click on specific items for further explanation.

 

This resource requires students to have already covered the concepts of State and Federal parliamentary structures and systems (Stage 3 NSW K-6 HSIE Syllabus). This site provides a platform for students to explore their understanding of the election processes within the broader function of government.

 

The content could be applied to a range of work pieces to help students explain the electoral process, including:

 

1) A timeline of the election process:

Document numbers of days after first sitting of Parliament an election is called, days after closing date for enrolments that election is held, time after election that results are called etc.

 

2) Create a ballot paper:

Using the process outlined in the video, create a class ballot paper – this could then be used to conduct a class-based election.

 

References:

 

Australian Electoral Commission (2011), Student animations and interactives - election day, Retrieved 29 March, 2014 from

http://www.aec.gov.au/Education/Democracy_Rules/interactives/election_day/index.htm 

 

Board of Studies NSW, (2006), Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus, Sydney: Board of Studies, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93415130-2afa-4654-a740-cf3d399d2627/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

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Get Voting - School elections made easy

Get Voting - School elections made easy | HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
Rebecca Mahar's insight:

Conducting an in-class election is a great way for students to actively participate in election process activities. This realistic application of what they have learnt in class allows students to have a practical experience of electoral processes in the context of their own life experiences. (Gilbert, 2011, p.143-144)

 

To make it easy the AEC can post to your school an Election Day pack!

 

The pack includes:

- A Get Voting information letter

- A ballot box

- 2 ballot box seals

- 2 colour posters to display around the school

- 5 badges for election officials

- A carry bag for easy storage

 

On request, you can even arrange your very own AEC Officer to help with running the election!

 

The pack includes options to run elections by first past the post and preferential voting systems, providing opportunity to discuss the differences between these two electoral systems.

 

Mathematics and statistics outcomes outlined in the Australian Curriculum  and NSW K-6 maths syllabus are also achieved by students counting votes and announcing the winner.

 

Ideally this activity would be introduced after students have an understanding of the context surrounding an election and voting systems, building on knowledge they would have explored through earlier introductions.

 

This resource also provides opportunity to recreate the entire election process - nominating candidates, running election campaigns around key issues and following Election Day protocols on the day.

 

References:

 Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, (2014), Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Curriculum/F-10

 

Australian Electoral Commission, (2014), Get Voting, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://education.aec.gov.au/getvoting/content/faq.html

 

Board of Studies NSW, (2012), NSW Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/mathematics/mathematics-k10/outcomes/

 

Gilbert,R, (2011), Active and Experiential Learning. In Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B (Eds) Teaching Society and Environment (pp.141-157), Melbourne: CENGAGE Learning

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Democratic Elections - global perspective

Democratic Elections - global perspective | HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
Every three years we get the chance to elect someone we want to lead the country. It's important because it gives everyone a chance to say what sort of country they want Australia to be. Recently there was the same sort of election in the country of Iran, but it's made people really angry because they say it was unfair. Let's find out what's going on.
Rebecca Mahar's insight:

This resource looks at the importance of transparent practices in election processes.

 

It makes use of, the now historical, events of 2009 protests in Iran following allegations of election rigging, and discusses how democratic and election processes can be rigged.

 

The video discusses social reactions and consequences to transparency issues in elections and what measures the Australian Electoral Commission takes to ensure transparency during Australian Federal Elections.

 

Discussion from this video can be tied back into values promoted in the HSIE K-6 syllabus around democratic processes including ethical behaviour, use of democratic means to become agents of change and respect for individual freedoms, rights and responsibilities and how they are important to ensure fairness and socially just election processes. (Board of Studies, HSIE K-6 Syllabus, p.13)

 

Students can make use of a T-chart  template to present characteristics of transparent election and corrupt election practices and engage in further discussion about how transparent practices can be encouraged.

 

Although events in Iran have evolved since this report, if approached from a historical perspective, these can provide a foundation for further discussion on the consequences of non-transparent election processes. With an understanding of the influence of election process on social unrest, students could conduct further investigations into current situations of political unrest, such as Thailand, and examine how the role of transparency influences these situations. Or look to current elections in India and Indonesia and investigate what transparency measures these countries are taking in their elections. These further investigations could be presented as a country case study or using a consequences chart.

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW, (2006), Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from

http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/93415130-2afa-4654-a740-cf3d399d2627/k6_hsie_syl.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Behind The News (2009), Democratic Elections, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2600931.htm

 

Global Education (2012), Templates. Retrieved 3 April 2014 from

http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/resources-gallery/resource-gallery-templates.html

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How preferential voting works - ABC BTN Video and link to more activities

How preferential voting works  - ABC BTN Video and link to more activities | HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes | Scoop.it

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3835708.htm

Rebecca Mahar's insight:

 

This four minute clip is a great resource to explain the preferential voting system to students.

 

Set in a relatable scenario of a group of friends deciding on a movie selection, it covers the different processes and outcomes of an absolute majority voting system and the preferential voting system.

 

These processes are then put into the context of the federal election process, with step by step explanations of how candidates are eliminated or found to be successful. And it also explains the differences in outcome from a majority versus preferential system. 

 

The website also includes a range of related resources and websites for classroom activities. These activities encourage students to investigate concepts further beyond the video, and apply their findings to provide real world examples or activities that explain electoral processes.

 

Activities include:

- guiding questions to ask students to explain and further discuss the preferential voting system;

- comparing different voting systems;

- a key terms overview; and

- an exercise to hold an in-class election

The activity suggestions directly related to the video can be found at:

http://www.abc.net.au/btn/resources/teacher/episode/20130903-preferentialvoting.pdf

 

Making use of this resource in conjuncture with learning about events that surround elections can provide students with a detailed understanding of the whole electoral voting system.

 

Suggested activities can also link in with outcomes beyond HSIE, with the process of counting votes related to mathematics and statistics outcomes in the Year 5 and 6 in the Australian Curriculum  and Stage 3 of the NSW K-6 maths syllabus.

 

 

References:

 

Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Behind The News (2013), Preferential Voting, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s3835708.htm

 

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, (2014), Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/mathematics/Curriculum/F-10

 

Board of Studies NSW, (2012), NSW Mathematics K-10 Syllabus, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/mathematics/mathematics-k10/outcomes/

 

 

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Incorporating Indigenous perspectives into electoral processes: consult and localise

Incorporating Indigenous perspectives into electoral processes:  consult and localise | HSIE K-6: Stage 3 (SSS3.8): Electoral Processes | Scoop.it
Rebecca Mahar's insight:

Incorporating Indigenous perspectives into a unit of work on electoral processes should recognise the diversity across Indigenous culture and social systems, and the existence of systems of representation and Indigenous identity that exist within and alongside Federal and State government institution processes. 

 

However, traditional knowledge, such as kinship structures and laws are often sacred and information is only shared when there is a ‘right to know’ (McDonald & Stevens,2011, p.391-392). It is important to be wary of using materials which may represent regions outside your area, and to not generalise or stereotype traditions (McDonald & Stevens,2011, p.392). With this in mind, it is vital to consult your local Indigenous community organisations (such as the featured NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group), when addressing governance and kinship structures in the classroom. Consultative groups will be able to provide what information they can specific to your local area and provide guidance on appropriate use of this information.  (McDonald & Stevens,2011, p.392)

 

Always assess any material representing Indigenous culture for appropriateness of use by referring to assessment guides, such as the NSW Government Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. For example, Nadia Wheatley’s compilation of stories in the book ‘Playground’, introduces the role of kinship and elders in the transition of knowledge, laws and customs relating to specific Indigenous groups across Australia. Alignment with the resource guide’s selection criteria for appropriate material is evident; engaging in community consultation, input, acknowledgement and representation of diversity of Aboriginal cultures. However, through local consultation you should determine if this publication is suitable to your specific location, to introduce the concepts of kinship.   

 

This approach is also supported by the Australian Curriculum, which recognises the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nations across Australia and the sophisticated family and kinship structures which make up Indigenous societies.

 

References:

 

Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority, (2014), Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures, Retrieved 29 March 2014 from  

http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/CrossCurriculumPriorities/Aboriginal-and-Torres-Strait-Islander-histories-and-cultures

 

NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group Inc (2014), Retrieved 29 March 2014 from http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/,

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, (2003), Aboriginal Education K-12 Resource Guide. Retrieved 29 March 2014 from:

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

McDonald, H & Stevens, V, (2011), Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in SOSE. In Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B (Eds) Teaching Society and Environment (pp.385- 402), Melbourne: CENGAGE Learning

 

Wheatley, N (2011), Playground, Australia:Allen and Unwin

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