HSIE K-6 – Stage 3 – Change and Continuity - CCS3.1 - Significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage.
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Nelson Mandela Death: A Look at South Africa's First Black President - Documentary - YouTube

Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Nelson Mandela, who led the emancipation of South Africa from white minority rule and served as his country's firs...
Jesse Ferris's insight:

I think that the documentary by The New York Times, ‘Nelson Mandela Death: A Look at South Africa’s First Black President’, is a valuable resource.

The documentary is relatively short in duration (12 mins) but it covers a lot of ground and touches briefly on topics that can be expanded upon later through further analysis.

 

Discriminatory policies such as apartheid can be explored and used to highlight the broader notion of democracy and how policies such as apartheid impact on the civil liberties of some groups in society while directly benefiting others.

 

The policy of apartheid can be compared to other discriminatory policies in other parts of the world and can be paralleled to discriminatory policies and events in Australia’s past such as the white Australia policy and the stolen generation.

Teachers could also use a case study of Nelson Mandela as a springboard to study significant Indigenous leaders in Australia’s past such as Eddie Mabo.

 

There are many learning experiences that could arise from the study of a figure such as Nelson Mandela, one such being students list adjectives to describe Mandela and then from that create a poem about his life which would cover English outcome EN3-2A.

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Aboriginal People of Coastal Sydney - Australian Museum

Aboriginal People of Coastal Sydney - Australian Museum | HSIE K-6 – Stage 3 – Change and Continuity - CCS3.1 - Significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage. | Scoop.it
Explore the rich and complex customs of Aboriginal people in the past and the importance of the Harbour in their daily lives. To contemporary Indigenous Australians, Port Jackson has a continuing importance.
Jesse Ferris's insight:

This site can be used as a resource to further build on the work done using the interactive indigenous language map. The resource is a section of The Australian Museum’s website entitled Aboriginal People of Coastal Sydney. There are various categories on the page including ‘Introduction to Aboriginal Sydney’, ‘Research Projects’, ‘Fish and fishing’, ‘Canoes’ and ‘Food from the sea’.

 

Of particular interest though, in relation to the indigenous language map, are the categories ‘Place names’ and ‘Clan names and language groups’. In the ‘Place names’ category there is a place names chart. This chart gives the names of current locations in and around Sydney such as Manly Cove or Chowder Bay and provides the Aboriginal name equivalent for that location. Teachers could provide students with a blank map of Sydney and get groups of students to identify a number of different locations and provide the Aboriginal name for those locations. Then each group could contribute their findings to a large blank map on the wall to provide a detailed map of Sydney with Aboriginal names of every location.

 

This site is also a great resource for painting a broader picture of Aboriginal culture in coastal Sydney in the sense that it explores what the diet of these people were like and how they went about catching their food with traditional fishing gear such as net bags, spears and canoes.

 

To follow on from this activity teachers could invite an Aboriginal community leader form the local area to the school. The community leader could potentially teach the class a traditional song, sung in their native language. Once students had learned the traditional song, they could perform it to another class or in school assembly. This activity would satisfy outcomes in the creative arts syllabus under MUS3.1. Students could then hold an interview with the community leader, asking any questions they have in regards to Indigenous culture. This activity would also satisfy ‘Speaking and Listening’ outcomes for stage 3 in the English syllabus.

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The Burnt Stick

The Burnt Stick | HSIE K-6 – Stage 3 – Change and Continuity - CCS3.1 - Significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage. | Scoop.it
Jesse Ferris's insight:

After looking through the NSW BOS suggested texts for the English K-10 syllabus document (http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/english-k10-suggested-texts.pdf), I came across what I consider to be a very valuable text in the form of Anthony Hill’s book, ‘The Burnt Stick’.

 

 

‘The Burnt Stick’ tells the story of a young Aboriginal boy by the name of John Jagamarra who is forcibly removed from the custody of his mother by the Welfare Department and raised by Christian missionaries far from his homeland.

 

Although the names of the characters and the geographical locations in the story are fictional, the story is a true one. It was told to Hill by an Aboriginal man he met in north-west Australia and is representative of what occurred throughout many parts of Australia until as late as the 1960s; the practice of removing Aboriginal children of mixed parentage away from their mothers, and to have them raised in institutions or with foster parents. The experience that we now collectively recognise as the ‘Stolen Generation’.

 

In the book, John’s mother, Liyan, manages to trick the authorities from taking her son away on a number of occasions by rubbing charcoal from a burnt stick all over his body to make him appear darker than he actually is. Eventually though, the authorities become aware of this deception and succeed in separating John from his family.

 

I feel like ‘The Burnt Stick’ is a quality resource for any teacher wishing to educate their students on the reality of the Indigenous experience in Australian history. I think that by framing this history in the form of a narrative as opposed to say a textbook, we are increasing the likelihood of the reader connecting with the content emotionally. If we can get our students to connect with subject matter on an emotional level, I think we have a far better chance of them being engaged and genuinely interested in that content.

 

A classroom activity that could arise from reading ‘The Burnt Stick’ in relation to teaching students about the stolen generation is to get students to examine factual accounts of Aboriginal children being taken away from their parents. After they had read both the factual accounts and ‘The Burnt Stick’, students could be asked to recount the story from the perspectives of the policeman who removed John Jagamarra from his family, the stationmaster’s wife, as well as John and his mother.

 

As well as satisfying outcome CCS3.1 in HSIE, this activity would also attend to the Drama outcome DRAS3.1 – Students develop a range of in-depth and sustained roles. Storytelling in role is a powerful technique for getting students to feel real empathy with characters from divergent sectors of society.

 

Another activity could be to get students to write a letter either from John to his mother or from John’s mother to John, describing what life is like for them after the separation. This would satisfy English outcome EN3-7C, which encourages students to think imaginatively, creatively, interpretively and critically about information and ideas and identifies connections between texts when responding to and composing texts.

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ABC TV: Captain Cook

ABC TV: Captain Cook | HSIE K-6 – Stage 3 – Change and Continuity - CCS3.1 - Significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage. | Scoop.it
Jesse Ferris's insight:

This site is an online interactive accompaniment to the ABC documentary series ‘Captain Cook – Obsession & Discovery’ (https://shop.abc.net.au/products/captain-cook-obsession-and-discovery).

Teachers could show the documentary series to their class (or sections of the series) and then use this resource to design follow up activities based on the documentary. Alternatively, I feel that this resource is detailed and rich enough to use as a stand-alone resource without having to watch the documentary.

 

The site is divided up into various sections including Cook’s early years, Cook’s navy career and Cook’s first, second and third voyages.  Each section has an interactive map, which allows students to click on significant dates or locations on Cook’s voyages. Once a significant date/location is clicked on, it expands into a detailed description of what occurred on that date/location often encompassing video extracts from the documentary series and sometimes even including excerpts from Cook’s journal which adds great depth and authenticity to the already detailed descriptions. There is also a study guide/resources section, which has links to other great Cook related sites including access to his full journal’s and journal’s written by some of his travelling companions.

 

I like this resource because it helps students gain an understanding of James Cook the person rather than just some dry historical figure. Students will gain an understanding of Cook’s childhood, his aspirations and desires and also a great visual representation of the significant moments of Cook’s life.

 

Student’s could analyse the arrival of Cook’s fleet from a colonial and Indigenous perspective by creating imagined diary entries and consider the biases that may have been present in the historical representation of Cook’s exploits. This activity would satisfy English outcome EN3-8D. Teachers could set an assessment task of a quiz asking significant questions about Cook’s life such as ‘Where was Cook born?’, ‘On what year did he set off on his first voyage?’ and ‘Where did Cook first set foot on Australian soil?’ etc.

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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | HSIE K-6 – Stage 3 – Change and Continuity - CCS3.1 - Significance of particular people, places, groups, actions and events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage. | Scoop.it
Jesse Ferris's insight:

This website includes an interactive indigenous language map of Australia. The map is interactive in the sense that you can hover your cursor over the map and it will zoom in on the highlighted zone.

 

This is a good tool for dispelling misconceptions that students might have in relation to indigenous culture and language, such as perhaps thinking that all Aboriginal people speak one common language. Students could compare the indigenous language map with a current map of Australia and discuss how modern borderlines might have impacted on traditional borders and languages.

 

An alternative activity that might arise from analysis of the indigenous language map is encouraging students to identify which language groups their school, home or favourite sporting team falls into. Teachers could create worksheets asking students to identify the indigenous language that is spoken in each of Australia’s capital cities. Teachers could also get students to connect more personally with the map by asking them to identify the indigenous language spoken in places that they have been on holiday, places where their relatives live or places that they may have lived in previously.

 

Students could then go on to discuss the impact that the introduction of English through colonialisation has had on Aboriginal languages.

Questions such as, “How many indigenous languages survive today?” and “What are some of the factors that have lead to the demise of some of these languages?” could be researched individually, in groups or as a whole class.

 

In addition to addressing outcome CCS3.1 in HSIE, this resource would also be effective in satisfying outcome EN3-1A of the English syllabus and specifically the content (ACELA1515) that students understand that different social and geographical dialects or accents are used in Australia in addition to Standard Australian English.

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