HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Care of Resources, including Waste Disposal
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An Aboriginal Perspective: Caring for the land - Burning for Biodiversity

An Aboriginal Perspective: Caring for the land -  Burning for Biodiversity | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Care of Resources, including Waste Disposal | Scoop.it
Traditional ecological knowledge has been used in powerful combination with Western science to enhance the biodiversity and cultural values of wetlands in Kakadu National Park in Australia's Northern Territory.
Natassja Amelia Whitaker's insight:

The following website is a great resource for teachers to use in the classroom. It presents an aboriginal perspective, detailing how fire management was used as a traditional strategy to help care for the land. It also introduces the significance of wetlands to indigenous Australians, and described how this natural ecosystem and its biodiversity flourished as a result of fire management. The resource relates to HSIE K-6 outcomes ENS1.5, compares and contrasts natural and built features in their local area and the ways in which people interact with these features, and ENS1.6, demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people.

 

The website answers of series of questions concerning why fire management of wetlands was/is important, and the positive effect that burning has on the ecosystem in terms of improving diversity of flora and fauna. The website also goes into detail about how fire management controls Mudja - a native grass that chokes wetland plants and diminishes habitats. Additionally, it features a short video to accompany the information, with the underlining message: “You look after the country, and the country will look after you”.

 

Incorporating Aboriginal perspectives into the curriculum provides a wonderful opportunity to value indigenous cultural heritage and enrich education for students (Nakata, 2011). Browett and Ashman (2010) stress the importance of educating students about different cultures outside their immediate community, in order to encourage appreciation, value and respect diversity. Exposure to an array of cultures also attributes to students cultural understandings, assists them in forming a sense of identity, and allows them to positively understand their place in the world (Browett & Ashman, 2010).

 

Lesson Activity Ideas: In addition to educating students on the significance of fire management, teacher could also introduce and define the term ‘wetland’ (providing a local example if possible). Discuss the importance of land to Aboriginal people. Explain how aboriginal people lived in harmony with environment. Examine other methods of how Aboriginal people cared for the land. Teacher could organise a trip to the local wetland and distribute worksheets to students where they can identify features of the natural ecosystem, including identifying what kinds of flora and fauna flourish there. Encourage students to identify if there is any pollution present. Afterwards teacher can stimulate a group discussion reflecting on the harm this pollution may be causing to the biodiversity present. Teacher could construct a group mind map with the class to summarise findings or encourage students to creatively present the findings to the class. Teacher could introduce peer assessing where students can constructively offer insight and advice to their peers. These lesson ideas would effectively build on literacy and public speaking skills.

 

Note to teachers: When planning additional extension tasks or assessments, it is imperative to adopt a critical perspective to ensure that stereotypes and prejudice views are NOT introduced in the classroom (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014).

 

Working towards ENS1.5 indicators:

- expresses feelings for particular environments and why they have these feelings

- recognises Aboriginal people's special relationship with the land

Working towards ENS1.6 indicators:

- recognises that Aboriginal people have interacted positively with the environment for a long time

- recognises that people from other cultures have differing relationships with the environment

 

References

Browett, J. & Ashman, G. (2010). Thinking Globally: Global Perspectives in the Early Years Classroom. Carlton South, Australia: Education Services Australia.

 

Nakata, M. (2011). Pathways for Indigenous Education in the Australian Curriculum Framework. Indigenous Education, 40, 1-8.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cenage Learning Australia.

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The Litterbug: Reuse, Reduce, Recycle

The Litterbug: Reuse, Reduce, Recycle | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Care of Resources, including Waste Disposal | Scoop.it

Accessing 'The Litterbug': First click the link. Second click the PDF file 'Litter Bug'.

Natassja Amelia Whitaker's insight:

‘Litter Bug’ is an excellent teacher’s online resource pamphlet, integrating factual knowledge of pollution and a series of lesson plans aimed at promoting active citizenship and responsibility, in which students will explore the social and environmental impacts of littering. The resource relates to the HSIE K-6 syllabus, stage 1 outcome (ENS1.6), demonstrates and understanding of the relationship between environments and people. It is a resource best suited to students in stage 1 and 2.

 

The pamphlet begins with two pages of factual information, specifically for the teacher to use as an educational resource. It discusses the impact of littering, provides statistics concerning how much litter Australia produces annually, and discusses the fundamental reason behind why people litter. It then features a reference list of organisations and websites for the teacher to access for further information.  

 

Litter Bug then has an array of detailed lesson activities concerned with littering, for teachers to implement in the classroom. The classroom activities featured include discussions, scenarios and questions, mapping activities, small group work, and an active investigation to carry out in the school playground in which children are invited to locate rubbish and later analyse data. Litter Bug also features lesson activities designed around encouraging creativity, in which students are can create a campaign designed to raise awareness of littering via logos, advertisements, posters, slogans or jingles. Other features of Litter Bug include extension tasks and a worksheet which humorously identifies the eight types of litterers.

 

A possible extension task may include incorporating role play to demonstrate these eight types of litter bugs. Another potential assessment may involve introducing the 3 R's to students (Reduce, Reuse & Reycle). Help students understand that they may positvely make a difference in the world by reducing consumerism/waste and by reusing old items. Get students to pick one item, and find a new use for that item. This assessment task will improve innovativeness, creativity, communication and problem solving skills.

 

Gilbert and Hoepper (2014), discuss the need for school curriculums to encourage active engagement with local concerns and explore strategies to work towards a sustainable future. By encouraging an investigation of waste disposal within the playground (in the Litter Bug activity), it enables children to understand that their actions impact on the environment. For example, students will be exposed to the enormous amount of waste that is produced on a daily basis and discover how much waste is not disposed of properly within a waste bin. By the end of the Litter Bug lesson plan, students will be motivated to participate in sustainable practices and will gain a sense of morality concerning environmental sustainability (Browett & Ashman, 2010). Browett and Ashman (2010), note that sustainability education is critical for developing environmental stewardship, interdependence, active citizenship and respect for the earth. They also stress that encouraging active participation in learning (which is heavily emphasised in the Litter Bug lesson activities), will assist meaningful engagement, overall understanding and knowledge. (Browett & Ashman, 2010).

 

Furthermore, Litterbug integrates mathematical and numeracy knowledge, in which students are encouraged to collect, display, summarise and interepet data.

  

References

Browett, J. & Ashman, G. (2010). Thinking Globally: Global Perspectives in the Early Years Classroom. Carlton South, Australia: Education Services Australia.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cenage Learning Australia.

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Global Perspective: Digging into the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Original Content Courtesy of: Plastic Paradise Find out how to watch the entire film or host a screening at: http://www.tugg.com/titles/plastic-paradise Face...
Natassja Amelia Whitaker's insight:

The educational video, ‘Digging into the Great Pacific Garbage Patch’ is an excellent and informative resource for Stage 1 students. It was designed to raise awareness of the threat that plastic pollution poses on our sustainable future. It highlights the importance of maintaining clean and safe ecosystems for marine and bird life, as well as our own existence. The resource provides an opportunity for students to better understand the relationship between environments and people (ENS1.6), and will assist students in understanding the importance of appropriate waste disposal.

 

The beginning of the video concentrates our how we as consumers are addicted to plastic. It details how we are surrounded by the substance and how it is used in “almost every area of our daily lives”. Most plastics are not biodegradable, thus they are practically indestructible and find their way into our ocean. The video presents a global perspective in that it shows how rubbish from all over the world is accumulating in the middle of the ocean and on islands like Midway Atoll, located midway between the United States of America and Japan. The Great Pacific Island Patch is just one of many gyres of marine debris located in oceans around the world (Anderson, 2014). Every year, “tens of thousands of pounds of garbage” are washed up on the shores of Midway Atoll, severely affecting the wildlife, including Albatross. The video shows how the garbage accumulating here derives from places around the world, mentioning Asia and North America in particular. The video also shows graphic images of marine life such as seals, turtles and fish, all of which have been impacted by our pollution. Albatross carcasses reveal that they have died from swallowing an array of small plastics (bottle caps and lighters).

 

Environmental degradation is a serious global concern relevant to all student’s current and future wellbeing (DSEWPC, 2010; Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014). Thus, it is imperative to encourage young people to develop a global conscious relevant to environmental sustainability, and to participate as active and informed “citizens in their local community, their nation and the wider world” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 300). Teachers need to incorporate global perspective in their classroom. To do so, teachers should personalise this message to students, by encouraging them to reflect on the impact their actions may individually be producing on the environment on a worldwide scale, when they dispose of waste carelessly. Encourage students to reduce their ecological footprint (DSEWPC, 2010), by minimalizing plastic consumerism. This may be achieved by opting for paper and biodegradable materials, reusing water bottles, refusing plastic straws, disposing of rubbish in the appropriate bins, creating innovative ways of reusing products, and recycling when possible.

 

Working towards ENS1.6 indicators:

- Identifies ways in which people's interactions with the enviornment can change that environment, eg the result of blocking up a river or chopping down trees

- Evaluates results of human change on environmentts relevant to them

- Shows an interest in environmental issues at local, national and global levels

 

References:

Anderson, E. (2014). Plastic ahoy! Investigating the great pacific garbage patch. The Booklist, 110(12), 78. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/1502700022?accountid=14757

 

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. (2010). Sustainability Curriculum Framework. Retrieved from http://www.environment.gov.au/system/files/resources/9b2e74ca-c909-4d57-bae3-c515c20957de/files/curriculum-framework.pdf

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cenage Learning Australia.

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Natural Resources: Dr. Seuss & Resource Use

Natural Resources: Dr. Seuss & Resource Use | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Care of Resources, including Waste Disposal | Scoop.it

The Natural Resource PDF is located under 'Unit 1: At the Source'.

Natassja Amelia Whitaker's insight:

This is a fantastic online resource for teacher’s to use as an educational tool to inform students about natural resources. It features five diverse lesson plans suited to primary school aged students. The lesson plan I will be referring to is ‘Dr. Seuss and Resource Use’ – suitable for stage 1. It specifically relates to the HSIE K-6 syllabus, stage 1 outcome ENS1.6, demonstrates an understanding of the relationship between environments and people and subject matter ‘care of resources, including waste disposal’.

 

It includes:

- What are natural resources with examples

- Differentiates between virgin & recovered resources

- Differentiates between renewable & non-renewable resources

- The benefits of natural resources

- Definitions

- The challenges of using natural resources

- Fact bubbles

- Emerging trends to cope with increasing resource demands

- Examples of innovative technology using recovered materials

- Recycling statistics

- Further recovery action

- Suggestions of how everyone can help conserve resources

- Websites for additional information and resources

 

Dr. Seuss and Resource Use: Students will learn about different types of resources as well as the negative impact that overconsumption may have on the environment. The lesson covers an introduction to natural resources concerning why they are important, how they are being exploited, the effect this has on the environment, and what they can do to help conserve our precious resources.  It then introduces students to the story ‘the Lorax’, through either film or book, and subsequently reflects on the moral of the story – the importance of environmental conservation.  The lesson involves a series of extended activities and assessments that encourage students to discover innovative ways of conserving resources.

 

Working towards ENS1.6 indicators:

- Identifies ways in which people depend on the environment

- Identifies way in which people's interactions with the environment can change that environment, eg the result of blocking up a river or chopping down trees

- Evaluates results of humange change on environments relevant to them

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Water Conservation

Water Conservation | HSIE K-6: Stage 1 Care of Resources, including Waste Disposal | Scoop.it

Accessing ‘Water is Special’: First click on ‘Wet and Dry Environments’. Second click on the subheading ‘Water is Special’.

Link to 'Water is Special': http://www.skwirk.com/content/upload/Kiddies/HSIE/main.swf

Natassja Amelia Whitaker's insight:

The following resource is an excellent online educational and interactive website specific to the Human Society and it’s Environment (HSIE) for Stage 1. It covers an array of content relevant to the Australian HSIE K-6 syllabus and the specific content strands (Change and Continuity, Cultures, Environments & Social Systems and Structures). The ‘Water is Special’ segment relates specifically to outcome ENS1.6, demonstrating an understanding of the relationship between environments and people. It will provide an opportunity for students to learn about water conservation, and the importance of caring for this valuable resource.

 

The visually engaging animation begins by detailing how much we as humans rely on water in everyday life. Students will be able to understand the significance of this natural resource as the animation depicts various scenes of children using water for a multitude of purposes. Some scenes include brushing your teeth, bathing and showering, drinking water, washing clothing, watering the garden, washing the car, caring for our pets and swimming. Subsequently, it reflects on the importance of saving water and lists strategies on how to minimise water use. The animation then raises the alarm that continued waste will deplete the natural resource for good, and concludes with an interactive game in which students are encouraged to turn off the running taps that aren’t in use.

 

Students need to be educated on environmental awareness and sustainability, in order to promote ecologically concerned citizens later in life (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014). The child friendly animation can be introduced into a classroom by teachers, as a fun and engaging introduction to educating students on the importance of conserving water. Subsequent classroom activities may include brainstorming alternative ways to save and recycle water (including the significance of rain water tanks), and encouraging students to become ‘water detectives’ - which may empower students by making them feel as though they can contribute to a sustainable future.

 

It is important for teachers to embrace the technological society that we are now living in, in order to inspire student interest and participation. Gilbert and Hoepper (2014), specify that incorporating information and communication technologies into a classroom may be valuable in enhancing student learning through encouraging engagement and motivation. Regular computer use within the home may also increase educational performance (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, 2010). Thus, the website may also be used as an excellent resource for students to re-access at home at their own leisure - its interconnectedness with the syllabus makes it a great online tool for reinforcing authentic learning. Additionally, the animation 'changing environments' located under 'the need for shelter', features another great animation designed to educate students on pollution.

 

Working towards ENS1.6 indicators:

- Identifies ways in which people depends on the environment

- Evaluates results of human change on environments relevant to them

- Identifies wise and unwise use of resources

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cenage Learning Australia.

 

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2010). Are the New Millennium Learners Making the Grade? Technology Use and Educational Performances in PISA. Paris, France: Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

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