HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures: Changes in work practices and industry in Australia, eg the impact of technology
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Twelve Canoes

12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
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“Twelve canoes” is an interactive website that provides stories and educational resources about the history and culture of the Yolngu people of Ramingining. One of the stories called “The Macassans” describes the trading of tools and technology between the Macassans and the Yolngu people in Australia. Based on the selection criteria from the Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide, I have selected this short clip as an appropriate resource that shows the diversity of Aboriginal culture through the recognition of Aboriginal input (Curriculum Support, 2011). Information presented in the short clip is conveyed through voice-over by an Aboriginal individual, where appropriate terminology is used to indicate respect to other cultures. Furthermore, the source highlights the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander technologies conveyed through the description of trading practices with the Macassans.

 

As a teaching idea, teachers may ask students to brainstorm what the term “technology” is, which is the use of resources and application of knowledge in creating products to meet society’s needs.  Reflection from the video may involve answering some focus questions such as: “What kind of tools did the Macassans and the Yolngu people trade?” “How did the trading of tools affect the lives of the Yolngu people?” “Name two technologies that were introduced by the Macassans and explain how they impacted the lives of the Yolngu people?” and “Do you think the Macassans had a positive relationship with the Yolngu people, and why do you think so?”

 

As an assessment idea, teachers may ask students to draw a tool/technology with a description about how they made the Yolngu people’s lives easier. Teachers can also ask students to reflect on what life would be like if they didn’t have these tools and then share their information with the person next to them. These assessment strategies would link with literacy outcomes (EN3-1A) where students demonstrate the ability to interact and discuss ideas. Thus, “The Macassans” narrative is effective in reinforcing an Aboriginal pedagogical framework that engages teachers and students through story-sharing. This is also highlighted by Wheaton’s (2000) understanding of story-sharing as an effective way of actively involving learners in introspection and analysis. Furthermore, the images of the land, people and the tools that were used were also shown on the clip. This highlights a place-based learning in Aboriginal pedagogy where meaning is created through understanding the importance of people’s relationship with place (Yunkaporta, 2009).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Curriculum Support (2011). Aboriginal education K-12 resource guide. Retrieved April 12, 2014, from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

 

Wheaton, C. (2000).  An Aboriginal pedagogical model: Recovering an Aboriginal pedagogy from the Woodlands Cree.  In Neil, R. (Ed.) Voice of the Drum; Kingfisher Publications: Canada.

 

Yunkaporta, T. (2009). Aboriginal pedagogies at the cultural interface. PhD thesis, James Cook University.

 

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Gold Rush

Gold Rush | HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures: Changes in work practices and industry in Australia, eg the impact of technology | Scoop.it
Have you ever heard about the gold rush of the past and wished you could strike it rich? Well now might be your chance! Gold mines that have been closed for years are opening up again, but before you grab a pick-axe and start digging, Sarah discovered that it's new technology that's blowing the cobwebs off some historic mine sites.
Grace Kwong's insight:

“Behind The News” is a news program appropriate for upper primary students where they can learn about issues that are currently happening in our world. The website contains many engaging activities catered for children’s learning interests such as quizzes and polls. The link called “stories” presents children with information about different kinds of topics. These are also accompanied by various classroom activities that are available for teachers to use. A particular topic or episode on BTN addresses the “Gold Rush” which explores relevant Stage 3 content on the impact of technology on changing work practices and industry.

 

On the website, some teaching ideas for this particular topic could be presenting this video to the class and ask students to individually answer some suggested focus questions such as: "When was gold first found in Australia?" "What happened after the first discovery of gold?" "Describe the different ways that gold was mined and illustrate the technologies that were used." "Why is mining all about weighing up the “costs” and “benefits”?" "What are some challenges that miners might face and how can they deal with these issues?" "What are the consequences of new technologies on workplace practices?" and "How do other countries such as China contribute to the productions in mining companies?"

 

As an assessment idea for this particular topic, teachers can ask students to pair up where they will prepare a 2 minute role-play that reflects the content of the video. This links with literacy outcomes (EN3-1A) related to critical thinking and interpreting texts through role-play.  One student can be a news reporter and the other a gold miner. The aim of the task is for the students to work together in coming up with inquiry questions about the life of a gold miner in the gold fields. Their script should address how mining practices have changed since the beginning, with reference to specific tools and technology.  Students should also comment on whether technology is beneficial to the miner/mining industry. For a global perspective, students should also refer back to the video in commenting on how the production and value of gold is linked with consumption from other countries.

 

I have selected this online resource because the critical inquiry that students engage in can provide focus and direction to their investigations when exploring the attitudes and perspectives of different groups of people (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014). Students are also encouraged to use other resources (e.g. internet, books) to support their argument. However, the teacher should raise awareness to the class about the consequences of plagiarism and what it means to produce their own work. In this case, a class activity may involve students to rewrite a paragraph taken from an internet source and then put it into their own words. Nevertheless, the use of ICT as an educational technology can create positive learning experience for students. As Mishra and Koehler (2006) suggests, educational technology provides powerful illustrations and explanations of subject matter that becomes more easily accessible to the learner.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th Ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge, Teachers College Record, 108, 1017-1054.

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HSIE Stage 3 - Port Kembla Gateway to the World

HSIE Stage 3 - Port Kembla Gateway to the World | HSIE K-6 Social Systems and Structures: Changes in work practices and industry in Australia, eg the impact of technology | Scoop.it
Grace Kwong's insight:

“Australia’s Industry World” is an online website that provides information about Australia’s manufacturing industry at Port Kembla. The website displays a section about taking a tour around the Port Kembla Steelworks, which is an experience that has educational value. The website also provides educational resources for students to complete, giving an opportunity for schools to visit the Port Kembla Harbour relevant to the HSIE syllabus that reflects the Stage 3 understanding of Australia’s interconnectedness with the global community.

 

As a teaching idea, the website suggests that students can visit the port as a school excursion. The students will be shown a video of the port and its development over the past 120 years. Students can complete the activity booklet “Port Kembla: Gateway to the World” in small groups of 3-4. Some focus questions that the website has suggested are: "What activity is taking place today at: The Coal loader? The Grain Terminal?" "Draw an example of technology that they can see in the industry," "What is happening today at: The Multipurpose Berth? BlueScope Steel Products Berth? Number 6 Jetty? Raw Materials Berth? Number 4 Jetty? Number 3 Jetty?"

The teaching activity links with a literacy outcome (EN3-7C) that involves critical evaluation and interpretation of ideas in a text provided at each destination. A post-excursion assessment activity can also link with mathematical outcomes (MA3-9MG) where students can be provided a map and be asked to label each location. Questions about scale can be used to assess conversion of measurement units. For example, if 1cm = 0.8km on the map, work out the distances between the Coal loader and Grain terminal. As an assessment task, each student may give a powerpoint presentation to the class, where they can choose any technology they observed at the port and present a 2 minute talk about how this particular technology has impacted the manufacturing industry in Australia and where these processed materials will be exported to.

 

I have selected this online resource as it enables teachers the flexibility to utilise resources in promoting student learning. For example the teacher may create a powerpoint that summarises the activities completed at the excursion before asking students to make their own. This can increase student motivation for learning when the teacher is successful in testing and modelling the application of ICT to students (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014). Furthermore the fact that students can make their own powerpoint presentations is a reflection of student-centred learning (Outcome: EN3-2A). This is highlighted by a constructivist approach that sees a shift from using technology as simply instructional tools to using them as cognitive tools in enhancing student learning through active and intentional knowledge construction (Gao, Choy, Wong & Wu, 2009).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Gao, P., Choy, D., Wong, A., & Wu, J. (2009). Developing a better understanding of technology based pedagogy, Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 25, 714-730.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th Ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Classroom Videos & Presentations | Cotton Australia

Grace Kwong's insight:

The online resource called “Cotton Australia” is a representative body for the Australian cotton growing industry, run by a community of cotton growers and ginners. On the “Australian cotton” link, there are sections that talk about facts that are related to cotton, such as its uses and where and how cotton is grown in the history of Australia. The “Cotton Classroom” link provides suggested classroom activities such as lesson plans, fact sheets, videos, presentations and even possible excursions to cotton farms. The video clip “The History of Cotton in Australia” outlines the history of cotton in Australia, starting with the First Fleet. Another video clip called “The Australian Cotton Story (primary version)” is an excellent multi-media resource that explains the basics of cotton farming and how some products that we use in our day to day lives are made of cotton.

 

As a teaching idea, you may show these two videos to the class for a more holistic understanding of the development of the Australian cotton industry influenced by advancements in farming technology. Students can be asked to answer questions related to the two videos presented to them. Teachers may choose to play the video more than once so students can take in more information. Some focus questions in response to the videos may include: "How was cotton collected when the cotton industry first began?," "Comparing the two videos, how has the process of cotton-picking changed over the 20th and 21st century?," "Name the technology the video mentioned that transformed the process of cotton-picking," "Why do you think new technologies are beneficial to the cotton industry?" and "What is cotton turned into and where is it exported to?"

 

As an assessment idea, teachers may ask students to try and jot down as much as they can so they can transform these short-answer responses to a more coherent piece of writing in the form of a mini-essay. This assesses the ability of students to respond to texts and develop arguments in light of evidence (Outcome: EN3-2A). Therefore, I have selected this video clip as an appropriate resource to meet the learning outcomes. This is in line with the pedagogical practices highlighted by Reeves (1998), who suggests that multi-media sources are especially powerful when they are explicitly produced for instructional use, and is most effective when teachers are actively involved in the selection and integration into the curriculum. Furthermore the resource I have selected emphasises the interdependence of countries in the importation and exportation of cotton in meeting common needs, which is relevant to the learning of global education (Evans, 1987).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Evans, C. S. (1987). Teaching a global perspective in elementary classrooms, The Elementary School Journal, 87, 5, 544-555.

 

Reeves, T. C. (1998). The impact of media and technology in schools: A research report prepared for the Bertelsmann Foundation. Retrieved  April 11, 2014, from http://it.coe.uga.edu/~treeves/edit6900/BertelsmannReeves98.pdf

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instore_teachersnotes.pdf

Grace Kwong's insight:

The Powerhouse Museum website provides excellent educational information about exhibitions related to Australian History. One of these exhibitions that the website informs about is one called “What’s in store?” which explores the changes in Australia’s retail history between 1880-1930. The website also gives an overview of what the exhibition is about, such as how there has been technological advances in handling money in response to the demands of the retail industry. The website also provides an excellent teaching resource that requires students to do various activities and answer questions while discovering different objects at the exhibition. The website also provides an interactive slideshow that gives a virtual tour of the exhibition, allowing students to be familiar with the materials prior to the visit or even to consolidate their learning after the visit.

 

The teaching idea on the website allows students to do various inquiry-based activities while visiting that particular exhibition. Prior to the excursion, students can watch the pre-exhibition slideshow that gives a virtual tour of the exhibition with descriptions of each object shown. At the exhibition, students can form small groups of 3-4 and move around to each object. They can read the accompanying description for contextual information, discuss and write down responses to the focus questions. Teachers may adapt the teaching resource to the appropriate stage, and assess students' understanding  through written responses to the following questions: "What ways did city stores and businesses advertise their products?" "From your experience, do you see any similarities to how this is done today?" "Why is there is a change in the culture of shopping and the work practices of businesses?" "How did the invention of the cash register impact the retail industry?" "Imagine you visited Sat’s general store in Bolong. How different would the experience be compared with a visit to a convenience store today?" and " What does the title “Providing for a community from the cradle to the grave" mean, and refer to a range of goods and services available in their store." As an assessment idea for numeracy outcomes, teachers may also develop a task that requires students to plot the dates of each object or image from the exhibition onto a timeline, where the distances between the dates are spaced out appropriately (Outcome: MA3-9MG).

 

This online resource has been selected because it reflects the pedagogical practices of an inquiry-based approach, where the objects and images can encourage reflection, enquiry, experiential and collaborative learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014). It also reflects the pedagogical practices of incorporating a global perspective which promotes a student-centred learning style, where the learner can make connections between their experiences and relevant global issues and events (Curriculum Corporation, 2008).

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Curriculum Corporation (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Quittner, K., & Sturak, K. Victoria Australia: Education Services Australia.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum (5th Ed.). Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia.

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