Features and Places in the Immediate Environment
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A Shared History: Aboriginal Perspectives in HSIE - Teacher Resource

A Shared History: Aboriginal Perspectives in HSIE - Teacher Resource | Features and Places in the Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"Support for the teaching of Aboriginal perspectives in the NSW Human Society and Its Environment K-6 syllabus."

Rhea O'Donnell's insight:

The curriculum support website: A Shared History is specifically designed to “support the teaching of Aboriginal perspectives in the NSW Human Society and Its Environment K-6 syllabus.” This is a fantastic resource when embedding Indigenous perspective. It is particularly beneficial teachers as a “resource to support the inclusion of Aboriginal history and culture.” (http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/shared/)

 

It is important to recognise that although this website may be useful in addressing features and places in the immediate environment, this resource will also be a valuable tool for many other learning activities.

 

The resources can be employed by the teacher to recognise and affirm Aboriginal identity, cultures and include Aboriginal viewpoints on events and issues. The website can be used to guide the development of curriculum and cultural integrity, whilst achieving a balance between contemporary and historical content. Teachers are able to use this digital tool to explore positive values, attitudes and beliefs that develop skills that lead to active citizenship.

 

The online resource enables the teacher to develop learning strategies for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. As suggested by Gilbert and Hoepper (2014) non-Indigenous teachers must take extra care to ensure Indigenous involvement and reflection regarding their own experiences and attitudes (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 362). As such, this online resource provides and exceptionally comprehensive set of guidelines and protocols to ensure that Aboriginal perspectives are successfully incorporated into learning activities throughout all Key Learning Areas (KLAs).

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences: History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia

 

 

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Scribble Maps - Student Resource

Scribble Maps - Student Resource | Features and Places in the Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"The Easiest Way to Draw and Share Maps!"

Rhea O'Donnell's insight:

Scribble maps is a free interactive online mapping application that is designed to allow users to draw, write text, add images, shapes and place markers over the top of particular maps provided by Google. The maps created can be saved to work on in the future.  

 

Scribble maps has multiple features and some of them include: a White Board option, which allows users to work on a blank platform (draw, place points, write text on a virtual ‘white board’).  Style Map button will encourage users to edit how features are labelled and displayed on the map. Video Tutorials provide a list of videos that teach the user how to use the application (I would recommend that the teacher watch these to gain a further understanding of this resource before introducing it in the classroom).

 

This online resource would be perfect for a compare and contrast exercise in the classroom i.e. city vs. country. The teacher could utilise an Interactive White Board (IWB) with this learning activity. This would allow students to come up one at a time and trace around or label key features and places of the immediate environment/s, creating unique maps for the students to explore further in the classroom. The teacher can also use satellite images to further enhance visual understanding of built and natural environments.  

 

To assess the students understanding of features and places in the immediate environment, the teacher could have students describe one aspect of the map that is of interest to them.  Such as their school, church, home etc. 

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My Place Website - Teacher Resource

My Place Website - Teacher Resource | Features and Places in the Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"Mischief and adventure abound in My Place, the story of 13 children, all with a talent for some kind of trouble. They live in the one place, over 120 years, 1888 to 2008."

 

Rhea O'Donnell's insight:

The My Place website is a digital resource that provides supplementary learning activities for the My Place TV series and the My Place picture book, which was written by Nadia Wheatley and Donna Rawlins (1987).

 

The website is structured using a timeline concept to exhibit specific experiences of changing environments and people throughout Australian History. The trans-generational perspective allows students to visualise altering landscapes and domestic environments from 1788 to 2008. 

 

Although this website is suggested for years 3 -6, the content and concepts are extremely relevant to HSIE early stage 1 as they are visually and aurally engaging. However, for this digital resource to be highly beneficial, a teacher facilitated learning activity is recommended, as this online tool is extensive and complex.

 

The teacher could facilitate a class discussion on the features and places of the immediate environment that the students recognise within the images. The images should be specifically selected by the teacher to introduce elements of the My Place website that particularly develop an understanding of the ‘now and then’ concept.

 

For example, the teacher could show the students the 3 images from 1888 (kitchen, bedroom and backyard scenes) that represent the built and natural environments. The teacher should ask the class the below questions:

 

- Does anything in the picture look familiar to you?

- Do you have any of these objects at your house?

- Where would you find this?

- How do we know what room / space this is?

 

To develop the critical thinking of the students, the teacher should ask the students to draw one thing from any of the 3 images that they have at their own house.

 

The teacher could also ask the students to identify the differences between the 1888 images and their own immediate environments. For example, the students might identify that there are no couches, televisions, computers or cars in the images.

 

The teacher should then lead a discussion about why features of the students’ immediate environment change over time. 

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Global Education: My Place, Your Place - Teacher Resource

Global Education: My Place, Your Place - Teacher Resource | Features and Places in the Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"Teacher resources to encourage a global perspective across the curriculum."

Rhea O'Donnell's insight:

The Global Education website provides teachers with resources about a range of global issues supported by case studies, country profiles and teaching activities. The My Place, Your Place teaching activity specifically addresses the issue of Poverty Reduction and uses a case study based on ‘Educating Girls in Pakistan’.

 

This teaching activity allows, "students explore why it is important to have a home, and reflect on what is essential for adequate housing”. The online resource provides information for the teacher to develop investigation strategies regarding different styles of international housing and it also fosters an awareness of environmental, cultural and economic factors that influence the kinds of homes people have. This resource provides multiple teaching ideas, and one of which could encourage students to engage with numeracy strategies.

 

The numeracy strategy for this teaching activity could involve the teacher asking the students to sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional and three-dimensional objects in the environment that is displayed from the digital resource. This activity could also link to the ‘Educating Girls in Pakistan’ case study as there is an image provided on the website that displays a distinct juxtaposition between the immediate environment of the classroom in both Pakistan and Australia.

 

This resource fundamentally reinforces the concept of recognising features and places of the student’s immediate environment as it categorically introduces potentially unfamiliar environments to the students, which requires them to process the differences between varying immediate environments within a global context.

 

This learning activity could also be linked to the notion of Global Citizenship as Cogan and Derricott (2000) argue that it is important for students to be sensitive towards and defend human rights in addition to being willing to change one’s lifestyle and consumption habits to protect the environment (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.419). This theory could be introduced to the student via the images linked to the ‘Educating Girls in Pakistan’ case study.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. South Melbourne, Victoria: Cengage Learning Australia

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BBC Schools Barnaby Bear - Student Resource

BBC Schools Barnaby Bear - Student Resource | Features and Places in the Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"The Barnaby Bear site contains lots of fun geography activities for 5-7 year olds. It follows Barnaby's adventures at home and abroad."

Rhea O'Donnell's insight:

The BBC developed the Barnaby Bear website specifically for children aged 5 to 7 years. As such, this digital resource is ideal for early stage 1 students in NSW.

 

The Barnaby Bear character allows students to use an online tool to independently or collectively explore and investigate varying places and immediate environments in an interactive and engaging way. The digital resource also introduces the concept of global citizenship, which is a fundamental principle of HSIE as it is critical for students in early stage 1 to identify both their own immediate environments and the environments of others. This theory can develop a student’s ability to “observe, locate and gather information about their immediate environment, including the home, classroom and school, through frequent contact and experience” (HSIE K-6 Syllabus, 2007, p.46). 

 

The ‘Stories’ section of this website could be used to develop: digital literacy and geography activities for early stage 1 students. The teacher could use the smart-board to present both the ‘Barnaby Down Under’ and ‘Barnaby goes to Paris’ stories as part of a broader unit of work. Many of these learning activities could also focus on developing numeracy and geography skills and strategies.

 

The students will be asked to identify how Barnaby travelled to each destination by completing a worksheet developed by the teacher. The worksheet will require the students to match the mode of transport to the travel destination. This activity will also introduce geographical concepts to the students though the use of either an atlas or globe. The teacher should show the students the distance between England and France and England and Australia. On the worksheet, the students will also be asked to estimate how long it might take for Barnaby to travel to each destination.

 

As a class, the students will help the teacher to make a list of environmental differences by identifying features and places they recognise in each of Barnaby’s immediate environments (e.g. rivers, trains, aquariums, Uluru, Eiffel Tower etc.).

 

To further cement the variances in immediate environments, whereby the students will be asked to make a list of 5 things that they saw Barnaby do in the immediate environments of both locations. 

 

NSW Board of Studies. (2007). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Author

 

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