HSIE K-6 Social systems and structures SSS1.7
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Where does honey come from?

Where does honey come from? | HSIE K-6 Social systems and structures SSS1.7 | Scoop.it
Discover where honey comes from. Learn how and why honey is made and how we get different types of honey. See what daily...
Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

A great video that explores how bees make honey! This would be engaging for stage one to discuss how goods such as honey are made, processed and made available through the use of systems and technology. It also has some preliminary teaching notes to kick start classroom thinking around this resource. I believe this resource could be used effectively do develop technical language, look at the environment, sustainability and ecosystems. Understanding and appreciating our native Flora and Fauna means that children can build their knowledge of the natural environment and be engaged with sustainability and advocacy in their own lives. 

 

I also this this resource is very relatable for children who are often fascinated by animals and insects and connects that interest with the concept of resources and systems that produce goods. Colony structure of the bees and hive and also the human structures and technology for collecting, processing and distributing the honey for our own use.

 

With a video such as this, it would be great to incorporate literacy strategies such as providing a rich introduction for the class before showing the resource. Asking what students already know about bees, or honey and collecting those ideas on the board. Reflecting after viewing is also significant to develop summarising and questioning strategies for young children (M. Hertzberg, Teaching English language learners in mainstream classes. Ch 5 Focus on reading, 2012). After viewing,  collecting the technical vocabulary and collaboratively creating or looking up definitions could produce a list to be used in writing activities or other text construction such as story boarding. Work samples can be used to assess whether outcomes are being met. Student ability to communicate their understanding through creating texts like that described above can be useful for teachers to tailor their teaching and meet student's learning needs.

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School Stories - Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation

School Stories - Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation | HSIE K-6 Social systems and structures SSS1.7 | Scoop.it

The first video on this page is a news report.

Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

The Kitchen Garden Foundation website has many great resources including teacher classroom resources and notes. Here is a quick news report that touches on the impact school gardens and sharing cooking skills can have on primary education. This could be discussed in relation to growing food in the garden, what is involved in nurturing plants and how different fruits, vegetables and herbs can be used to prepare meals and meet our daily food requirements. This could be extended to include different types of plants, native, edible and even habitat for animals. Students understanding how their immediate natural environments is a part of an ecosystem and supports life on many levels is significant. Beginning to understand the impact of our actions on the environment and what constitutes healthy living for ourselves and our  surrounding plants and animals is a big concept that can start to be expanded in stage one. How might recycling and gardening fit into student's current experiences of how they interact with resources? (Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. 2014, ch 8).

 

This news report could be used in the framework of literacy development, identifying features of various text types and their purposes. Students could be asked to create their own news report on something happening at their school or in their local community and share this orally with the class perhaps in small groups. Numeracy could also easily and effectively be incorporated into activities based on this resource. Students could look at planning their own garden. What would be required to lay out a vegetable patch? Which plants would they like to plant? How big would it be? How many rows of different plants could be planted? Working out perimeters and areas, maybe even volumes of soils, mulch, fertiliser, water etc. 

 

A learning experience that would incorporate both literacy and numeracy could be looking at recipes that use vegetables and ingredients that could be grown by students at home or at school. Understanding how to approach and understand a recipe is a skill that not all stage one students will have been exposed to. It is a procedural text that has its own defining features. Being able to follow a recipe is a skill and looking at writing down recipes is a great way to look at both measurement, sequencing and literacy, communicating a method clearly. At stage one this may need to be done in a structured way as a whole class group initially and then perhaps following a procedure in small groups. Making a biscuits or play dough.

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First Footprints Episode 3

First Footprints Episode 3 | HSIE K-6 Social systems and structures SSS1.7 | Scoop.it
Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

An excerpt from episode three is available along with many other resources in this website. Click on the 'Sydney' button on the map and then select 'Eora' from the submenu. This is a great two minute segment discussing natural food resources utilised by the Gadigal People.

 

This could be used very effectively to incorporate an Indigenous perspective for satisfying needs and wants into HSIE discussion of systems and structures. This is a great series that has been developed to a high quality and that seamlessly addresses Australian history, identity, geography and geology with an integral Indigenous perspective (APST2.4.1). This series also embodies a collaborative approach that is respectful of Indigenous Australian knowledge and history, pulling together western modes of geology, historiography with local community understanding. Bentley Dean the Director states; "Joining together the world's oldest oral histories with the latest science- often in the field as discoveries were being made- would become a key component of our narrative style." (Press kit for First Footsteps, 2013, p16)

 

In this particular clip the abundant natural resources are explained along with the tools and technology such as canoes, fire, hunting and gathering methods as well as cultural roles within communities to serve their needs. The comparison is made to a supermarket and this is a concept that would be effective to unpack with students. Examining different types of food in various cultures along with tools and systems that deliver those goods and services to a community. Particularly with stage one I feel it is important to start with their own experiences and knowledge, drawing on their current understanding before extending this to incorporate a broader, deeper comprehension. 

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Ghana: Faustina's Fortune - YouTube

When Faustina was a little girl, people in Ghana ate cassava to ward off starvation. Now this starchy tuber is the secret of her success.
Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

This a personal story delivered by a business owner, Faustina from Ghana. Her story about farming cassava and growing her business to employ more than thirty other local women clearly shows various technology used to process this food product. This is a good resource to discuss technologies such as hand harvesting, machines for pulping, water used to clean the plant and how this business has affected the life of her family. e.g. Fautina has sent her children to good schools and is supporting her community through employing other local women. Sustainability is also an issue that is raised, discussing how no part of the plant is wasted, even the skins are fed to animals and the extracted starch is sold separately for textile production. Some of the technical language is complicated for stage one but specific vocabulary can be defined and made relevant.

 

Looking at different international methods of agriculture and production are critical in developing an understanding of trade and production as well as differing division of labour and technology. Understanding how different countries and cultures operate allows us to discuss our own social systems and structures critically building on evaluative skills in later stages.

 

I feel that because this is a primary source it helps to draw a strong connection with the audience. This source could lead to discussion of trade, manufacturing, utilising individual's skills and systems that allow people to come together for a common purpose. Cooperation and resourcefulness could be discussed as attributes of Faustina and students could identify skills that they have and how we can develop collaboration and corporation in the classroom. 

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Merino sheep shearing, Australia. - YouTube

"A 150 year old Australian shearing shed, still using classic hand shearing and quality wool classing methods to produce super fine merino wool fleeces."

Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

Sheep shearing! This video shows the sheep being rounded up to the shearing shed, being hand shawn and the beautiful sheep skin spread out and graded before sending it away for processing.  Although not included in this text the class could research and produce work on what happens to the wool once it is shawn from the sheep, how it becomes a jumper, blanket or wooly hat. I believe this is a highly relatable and interesting topic that students could bring their prior knowledge to. If any student has been to a farm (sheep or otherwise) and can recount to the class, students may also be able to identify items of clothing from home that are made from wool.

 

This could be really interesting resource to use in a stage one classroom, there is very little verbal or written narration only background music. It would be effective to ask students what they saw in the video and collect ideas from the class as there may be a lot of variation within a class group of what stood out for individuals especially as there isn't any focus given by a voice over. 

 

Extending this learning opportunity to incorporate authentic experience would be highly effective in making the experience meaningful for the students. (Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. 2014, ch 8). Being able to show students what a piece of wool looks like before it is washed, spun, died, and turned into a textile and giving them a tactile sensory experience invites a stronger personal connection.

 

Discussing the technology and systems employed on a farm and touching on farming techniques opens up the discussion for sustainable practice and environmental impact of industry. A definition of native and introduced species may at this stage also be appropriate and helpful. As is a discussion of Indigenous hunting and gathering methods and global agricultural methods that serve the needs and wants of communities. 

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From the dairy to the shop

From the dairy to the shop | HSIE K-6 Social systems and structures SSS1.7 | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered about the steps involved in getting milk from a cow to you? This clip tells the story of milk,...
Phoebe Lillywhite's insight:

Milk, from cow to supermarket, this visually demonstrates excellently and with appropriate language the process of a dairy farm and pasteurisation process to get the milk to breakfast bowls. 

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