Stage 1 - Social Systems and Structures
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Aboriginal Use of Rocks and Minerals: Melbourne Museum

Aboriginal Use of Rocks and Minerals: Melbourne Museum | Stage 1 - Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

Phillip Batty, Museum Victoria, describes Aboriginal people’s use of rocks and minerals in Central Australia.

Natalie Chan's insight:

The video ‘Aboriginal Use of Rocks and Minerals’ by the Museum Victoria describes Aboriginal people’s use of rocks and minerals in Central Australia. While this resource may not be suitable for students in Stage 1, it is a great resource for teachers in preparation for a class incorporating an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) perspective. The video explores resources used by Aboriginal families and where they come from. One interesting aspect of the video focuses on ochre. Ochre was the most important painting material used traditionally by Aboriginal people. It is mined from particular sites and is a crumbly to hard rock heavily coloured by iron oxide. Paints are made by grinding the source rock to a powder and then mixing it with a fluid to bind it together. A relevant teaching idea is to talk about using ochre as paint and teach students to use yellow, white and red ochre to create their own Aboriginal paintings.

 

In addition to classroom activities, there is a need for ongoing, genuine dialogue between Indigenous members of the school community and teaching staff. It is important to continually embed Indigenous perspectives in the curriculum to maintain a holistic framework (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

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Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.

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Fish - From Ocean to Table

Fish - From Ocean to Table | Stage 1 - Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

Have you ever eaten fish for dinner? This clip tells the story of how fish come from the sea to your plate. See how fish are caught, bought and sold. Watch a fish being cut into fillets and find out what happens to the bits we don't eat.

Natalie Chan's insight:

The video ‘Fish for your dish’ from ABC Splash is an appropriate resource for teachers to use in their Stage 1 classroom to assist students in their understanding of resources used by families and where they come from. The video provides basic information on how fish are caught, bought and sold in Sydney. Walsh states that “literacy practices of students outside school reveal engagement with mobile, gaming and digital technologies with less interest in reading and writing print-based texts, particularly literature” (2004, p.14). This resource is therefore particularly effective as it encourages visual learning to help meet the diverse learning needs of students and to keep them more engaged. After watching the video, students can draw a flow chart with pictures that tells the story of the fish. Teachers can also stress the various roles of those involved in the local system of producing, transporting and selling fish, and their interdependence. In Stage 3, teachers can build on this content by arranging a school excursion to the Sydney Fish Market (http://www.sydneyfishmarket.com.au/AttheMarket/Tours/tabid/72/Default.aspx) and explore matters including: major Australian exports and imports, and changes in work practices and industry (Board of Studies, 2006).  

 

In addition to this video, teachers can incorporate a Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) perspective by talking about fishing methods used by Aboriginals. Students can also visualize these fishing methods by looking at images of Aboriginal fishing traps and nets from http://www.aboriginalculture.com.au/fishingmethods.shtml.

 

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Board of Studies NSW (2006). K-6 HSIE Syllabus. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie/&nbsp

 

Walsh, M (2004). Multimodal literacy: researching classroom practises: Primary English Association (e:lit). - New Literacy practises.

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China Down Under

China Down Under is a multistage HSIE teaching resource. The teacher’s book provides significant support for learning in Stages 1, 2 and 3. Detailed teaching notes, handouts and background information for Stage 1 are included. A class set of 30 booklets providing interesting and engaging images of contemporary China are also part of the resource.

Natalie Chan's insight:

“In the education context, there is a focus on quality teaching and learning and students must be provided with opportunities to achieve learning outcomes and develop the knowledge, skills and understanding that are essential to all areas of the curriculum” (Gigliotti, 2012, p. 79). One teaching resource that does this well is the China Down Under Teacher’s Resource developed by Curriculum Directorate to support the teaching of the HSIE K-6 syllabus outcomes. It is an excellent resource with a global perspective for teachers to use in a Stage 1 classroom. An interesting aspect of this resource is the Linking Australia with China activity, as it helps students to learn about resources used by families and where they come from. In this activity students are required to bring in a range of objects that have been made in China, e.g. shoes, toys, utensils, clothes, ornaments etc. Students are to categorise objects (e.g. clothing, footwear, kitchen items) and discuss the diversity of products. These can be used as headings to create a class retrieval chart. This is a very rich resource as it allows students to learn and participate in a hands-on experience. It helps students to question the way the world operates, which is an integral part of citizenship and social education (Forsyth, 2006).

 

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Forsyth, A.P. (2006). Constructing social education curriculum for the twenty-first century: The role and importance of economics education, AARE, Parramatta NSW.

 

Gigliotti. R.A. (2012), Journal of Student Engagement: Education matters, University Of Wollongong Australia. Retrieved on April 11, 2014 from http://ro.uow.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1019&context=jseem

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Pak Yono's Paddy Field: Growing Rice in Indonesia

Pak Yono's Paddy Field: Growing Rice in Indonesia is a big book about an Indonesian family, in Java, who grow rice. The book shows the rice growing cycle and the work undertaken by Pak Yono and his family as part of their daily lives. The teachers booklet provides focus question on the text and background information for teachers.

 

Link to Book: 

http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/primary/hsie/resources/pak_yono_2013.pdf

Natalie Chan's insight:

Pak Yono’s Paddy Field: Growing Rice in Indonesia and its supplementing ‘Teacher’s Background Information’ are reliable resources for teachers to use in a Stage 1 classroom. This resource supplements the HSIE Syllabus Stage 1 Social Systems and Structures outcome: SSS 1.7 Explains how people and technologies in systems link to provide goods and services to satisfy needs and wants. An important aspect of this resource is The Rice Growing Cycle, which can help students to learn about resources used by families and where they come from. Prior to reading the book with the class, teachers can establish students’ knowledge and experience with rice, rice growing, Indonesia and Asia. After reading the book, students can use atlases to find Java and Sydney and mark them on a blank map of Australia and Asia. Students can then use arrows to show the flow of rice from Java to Sydney. This activity is a great way in which students can gain a global perspective and understand the “complex social, economic and political links between people and the impact that changes have on others” (Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B., 2011, p. 368).

 

In addition, this book effectively links HSIE K-6 to other Key Learning Areas such as Mathematics by meeting the area outcome MA2-3WM Uses concrete materials and/or pictorial representation to support conclusions (Board of Studies NSW, 2006). Students can learn about measurement and time with relation to the different stages of the rice growing cycle.

 

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Board of Studies NSW (2006). K-6 Mathematics Syllabus. Retrieved on April 12, 2014 from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/maths/k6_maths_syl.pdf

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.

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Interactive Milk Cycle - Dairy Australia

Interactive Milk Cycle - Dairy Australia | Stage 1 - Social Systems and Structures | Scoop.it

Milk From Farm to Plate - What's it All About?

Natalie Chan's insight:

The Interactive Milk Cycle from Dairy Australia is a fantastic interactive resource for a Stage 1 classroom that helps students learn about the resources used by families and where they come from. It allows students to identify to the different stages of the milk cycle – from the dairy farm to the supermarket. The use of games and interactives as a learning resource is supported by the idea that "ICT helps to increase the motivation of certain children to learn" (Passey et al., 2004 as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.181). This reflects research on technological pedagogical content where "more recently, teacher education has shifted its focus primarily to pedagogy" (Koehler & Mishra, 2006, p.1020) and using resources such as interactives to engage students. This interactive resource can be followed up with a group activity where students have activity cards with the different stages of the milk cycle, and then they must arrange the cards to show the correct sequence.

 

There are also additional resources to further support the learning of the milk cycle. ABC Splash has a video called ‘Milk, from dairy to the shop’ (http://splash.abc.net.au/media/-/m/30258/from-the-dairy-to-the-shop), which uses basic vocabulary that is suitable for a Stage 1 classroom. Students can also learn from a hands-on experience through an excursion to the Sydney Royal Easter Show (http://www.eastershow.com.au/learning/milking-barn.aspx), where they can have a go at milking the cows.

 

In addition, the Interactive Milk Cycle can also effectively link HSIE K-6 to Key Learning Areas in Science and Technology. Stage 1 students can learn to make butter using milk (http://www.beyondthechalkboard.com/activities/making-butter/) and resultantly understand that products can be made, processed or grown (Board of Studies NSW, 1993).  

 

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Board of Studies NSW (1993). K-6 Science and Technology Syllabus. Retrieved on April 11, 2014 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/science/science-k10/

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning.

 

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A Framework for Teacher Knowledge. Columbia: Teachers College Record, pp. 1017–1054.

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