Money Madness - Early Stage 1 Resources for SSES1: The Use of Money
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Introduction to this Scoop.it Site

Introduction to this Scoop.it site

Katie Banh's insight:

 

 

Welcome to my Scoop.it site! This site is mainly for Early Stage 1 teachers who are wishing to find digital resources that relate to the HSIE Outcome SSES1 "Identifies ways in which their own needs and the needs of others are met, individually and cooperatively.", and the subject matter "the use of money". These 5 resources have been selected with the inquiry question of "What is money and how do we use it?". Additionally, there are 2 teacher resources and 3 student resources that relate to the topic of money. I hope you enjoy this Scoop.it site!

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Bead currency used in Australia's first export industry › News in Science (ABC Science)

Bead currency used in Australia's first export industry › News in Science (ABC Science) | Money Madness - Early Stage 1 Resources for SSES1: The Use of Money | Scoop.it
Indigenous Australians took European glass beads from Macassan seafarers in return for giving them fishing rights on traditional lands as early as the 18th Century, say archaeologists.
Katie Banh's insight:

Teaching Early Stage 1 students about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander use of trade as a form of currency is essential for understanding the Aboriginal culture. This teaching resource can provide assistance to teachers who are unaware of the means Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people use instead of money. The resource discusses the discovery of European glass beads which were used extensively as a form of currency when trading with passing ships.

 

The article is suitable for providing Early Stage 1 students with a new perspective on money usage. It allows them to understand that forms of money will change when there are different needs to be met. Furthermore, it doubles as a history lesson into the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the past. An interesting activity that may accompany this teaching resource would be to introduce Early Stage 1 students to the concept of ‘trade’. Early Stage 1 students would need to understand that in the past, ‘trade’ was the only form of ‘money’ available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. However, reiterate to students that ‘trade’ has the same value of ‘money’, in that items were received and their needs were met through trade. Buttons, bottle caps or paper clips may be used as an equivalent to the European glass beads. Involve students in this process of deciding a form of currency or money to trade with. Invite a class to trade items, and discuss together whether the value of the item being traded matches the amount of money used. Role play and scenarios can support Early Stage 1 students in envisioning a new way of looking at money. And combined with learning about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, it will promote the importance of their history, and how it has shaped Australia’s use of money.

Embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in this unit allows students to understand their culture on a deeper level, especially due to racist attitudes that may exist in schools and by exposing Early Stage 1 students to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, the cycle may end (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

Another interesting lesson that Harrison (2011) suggests is to dispel the stereotypes of Aboriginal and Torres Islander people by jointly creating a case study. The case study would focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identity, their living situation and how this has affected their needs as a community and individually. Additionally, when exploring the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, relay to students that everyone has the same primary needs of food, water and shelter. Ask them to reflect on the similarities prevalent between themselves and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people when using money.

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment 4th edition. South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

Harrison, N. (2012). Teaching and learning in Aboriginal education. Second Edition. Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University.

 

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World Interactive Map

World Interactive Map | Money Madness - Early Stage 1 Resources for SSES1: The Use of Money | Scoop.it
World Interactive Map, an interactive flash map application providing a quick over view about the countries of the world.
Katie Banh's insight:

Thinking from a global perspective should be cultivated at a young age. The outcome SSES1 ‘identifies ways in which their own needs and the needs of others are met, individually and cooperatively’ refers to global efforts in understanding the needs of people around the world. When planning to teach students about the global issues currently occurring in society, it is important to focus on “the intended outcomes of the syllabus documents which frame the subjects” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 101). Early Stage 1 students should be exposed to the different global issues currently affecting children around the world (Browett & Ashman, 2008). In saying this, decisions made around which global issues that are exposed to Early Stage 1 students are crucial. Especially due to the young nature of the students, there are some global issues that would be better suited for the older learning years. This has particularly influenced the type of activity that will accompany this interactive resource.

 

The interactive world map allows students to explore the different countries around the world, and the currencies used in these countries. By prompting students to understand that money usage is the same around the world, and relating this back to their own personal experiences, students are able to gain a deeper sense of understanding concerning their individual role in the global economy. An activity that may accompany this student resource would be to ask students to observe their parents whilst grocery shopping, or to ask their parents what they spend the most money on. Whether it is buying groceries, paying the bills or purchasing new items, students will report back to the class.  From this, together as a class, compile a list of ways that student’s families use their money. Now looking at the interactive world map, ask the class to select a few countries to explore. Use YouTube to find fun videos that relate to the country and its currency. Furthering this activity, discuss with students the aid efforts Australia provides to third world countries in need of help. This will build upon their global perspective of money, and what it means to use money to help people in need. By exposing Early Stage 1 students with this activity, they are able to build on their empathy, and their values and attitudes towards global issues (Browett & Ashman, 2008).

 

An additional activity to accompany the interactive world map would be to ask Early Stage 1 students to relay to the class which country they or their parents were born in. Together as a class, compile a list of countries, and use the interactive world map to investigate which type of money their country uses. This activity promotes global perspectives as it allows the class to further understand that money usage is very much the same around the world, with the only difference is the type of money used. By exposing students to this activity, a sense of connectedness with other global communities is promoted. Furthermore, this also supports the idea of ‘worthwhile learning’, where students are able to see the relevance of money usage in their personal lives (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

References:

Browett, J., & Ashman, G. (2008). Thinking globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom. New South Wales, Australia: Curriculum Corporation

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment 4th edition. South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

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Making Cents, Lower Primary: Using Money

Katie Banh's insight:

Making Cents, Lower Primary: Using money focuses on financial literacy for the lower years of primary. It provides multiple useful activities that engage and motivate students when learning about money usage. The SSES1 outcome holds strong links towards this document as it explores the needs of individuals and families, and provides opportunities for students to understand why money is used in society. In saying this, it also provides Early Stage 1 students with opportunities to develop their own understanding on money, whilst educating them to be financially literate in the future.

 

The activities mentioned in Making Cents range from focusing on educating students about the various roles money plays in our society, to how money influences the lifestyle of families.  Assessment strategies are an important tool for teachers to monitor the learning progress of students. It allows teachers to gain insight into student learning, and discover which teaching strategies are the most effective. Making Cents has a range of formative assessment strategies that accompany the activities mentioned in the document. Particularly, in HSIE learning, it can be difficult to find time to assess students. Thus, Making Cents provides quick and simple assessment strategies that are effective in allowing teachers to observe and monitor how students are progressing in their learning (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). This allows teachers to focus their time on improving and teaching the activities mentioned in the document. Additionally, all the activities in this resource hold cross curricular links to Mathematics, which makes it an ideal resource to use as it provides extra mathematical support for Early Stage 1 students.

 

It should be noted that this document does use Stage 1 outcomes in its activities; however, the activities mentioned in the document do not need to be followed step by step. And instead, may be used as a guideline for Early Stage 1 activities. As this resource contains activities, assessment strategies and useful teaching tips, teachers may just use one aspect of the resource in their classroom.

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment 4th edition. South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

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Australian Coins Lesson 1 - YouTube

This video is a lesson for students on recognising the characteristics and value of Australian coins. The song and video were created by Kelly Simms
Katie Banh's insight:

 When understanding “the use of money”, Early Stage 1 students need to be provided with opportunities to role play, and experience situations where money is being actively used. With this YouTube video, it creates a fun and interesting way to remember the different Australian coins, and how to differentiate between them. As students sing along to the video, they become engaged and are much more likely to understand and retain the information.

 

An activity that may accompany this fun YouTube video may revolve around creating a classroom shop that students may enact using money to purchase several items. Instead of a classroom shop, a classroom post office may be set up instead, where students pay for their “bills”, or send their letters off to various destinations which may lead on from the previous global perspectives activity.  A whole range of different money using situations may be created from this fun YouTube video, including mathematics activities where students use counting techniques to calculate the amount needed to pay for the services. An interesting note is that the YouTube video does focus only on Australian coins, and does not reference Australian notes. By introducing Early Stage 1 students to Australian coins only, they are able to build on the value of money by starting off with small amounts. It also prevents sensory overload, where students may become confused over the enormity of money, which can then limit their ability to remember and understand money’s uses. The use of role play in the classroom is seen as “experiential learning”, as students discover by themselves what is right or wrong (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 148). In saying this, it also allows students to enhance their conversational skills, as well as providing them with an opportunity to experience using money.

 

References:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment 4th edition. South Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia

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Australian Money for your SMART Board » primaryedutech.com

Australian Money for your SMART Board » primaryedutech.com | Money Madness - Early Stage 1 Resources for SSES1: The Use of Money | Scoop.it
Download a Notebook file that you can use when you next time do a money unit using your Smartboard. It includes pictures of both sides of all the Australian coins and notes. This clipart is very handy for developing your own Notebook money resources.
Katie Banh's insight:

Prior to Early Stage 1 students learning about the use of money, students must first be exposed to Australian money, and thus be able to identify Australian money. This interactive Smart Board clip art provides Early Stage 1 students with the opportunity to visually identify Australian money. Additionally, this resource would be constantly revisited throughout the unit, as it is versatile and can always be used as a reference when teaching students about money.

 

An activity that may accompany this resource would be to create a concept map that describes the features and uses of Australian money. As a class, discuss “Why would we use money?”, “What does money look like?”, “How do we know what money we should be using?”. Scaffold students thoroughly through this activity by using the Smart Board clip art as a springboard for students to describe the appearance of Australian money. To scaffold students through the question of why we use money, ask them to relay their personal experiences with money to their partner (think, pair and share). Then ask them to inform the class what their partner has told them, this provide important insight into what students already know.

 

Cooperative learning is promoted through this strategy, and can be allow students to experience ‘exploratory talk’, in which they are able to personally reflect on their experiences (Gibert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 145). Additionally, this activity extends to literacy, as students are utilising adjectives to describe Australian money, which can be linked to ENe-9B “demonstrates developing skills and knowledge in grammar, punctuation and vocabulary when responding and composing texts” (Board of Studies, 2012). Furthermore, this enhances their conceptual understanding of money, and provides an added bonus as visual links are vital for ESL students when understanding new concepts (Marsh, 2008).

 

This is a great resource to have in the classroom as an introduction to the unit on money, with the added bonus that this resource can also be used for Mathematics.

References:

Board of Studies NSW. (2012). English K-10 syllabus: English K-6 syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia

Marsh, C. (2008).  Studies of society and environment. 5th Edition. New South Wales: Pearson Education Australia

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