HSIE Early Stage 1- Where do products come from?
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happy to be me - Picture Book - Tucker

happy to be me - Picture Book - Tucker | HSIE Early Stage 1- Where do products come from? | Scoop.it
happy to be me – Picture Book - Tucker
Aaron Jolley's insight:

The picture book ‘Tucker’ by Wendy Notley explores the relationship that Indigenous Australians have with the land and the resources that they have collected and used from the land for over thousands of years. It explains that tucker was hunted and collected from the land rather than buying it from the shops that we have nowadays, but some Indigenous communities or ‘mobs’ go out to the bush on weekends and hunt for their food, upholding the traditions and way of life that has existed for over thousands of years.

 

The book is written by an Indigenous author and illustrated by Indigenous artist, bringing an authenticity and deeper meaning and understanding to the words and images throughout the book. This is important as many resources written and produced about Aboriginal people and their cultures in the past “contained inaccurate, negative and stereotyped information…. and were written by non-Aboriginal people, without consultation with Aboriginal people” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003, p.9). Therefore, teachers need to take a “discerning and considered approach, and be aware of cultural bias and stereotypes” (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003, p.9).

 

The book is visually stunning and provides students with an engaging way to learn about Indigenous Australian’s relationship with resources and products over time. A glossary containing both word meanings and picture meanings is provided to allow both teachers and students to clarify the meaning of any Indigenous words (e.g. Barra, Koori, nosh) and pictures (e.g. goanna, fish, berries). The inclusion of Aboriginal content across the curriculum has led many educators to recognise the “value of including Aboriginal people in their planning and teaching” (NSW Board of Studies, 2008, p.9) and therefore, future lessons on this topic could involve Indigenous community members teaching students more Indigenous language and traditions.

 

References:

 

NSW Board of Studies (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved from

http://ab-ed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf

 

NSW Department of Education and Training (2003). Aboriginal Education K–12 resource guide. Retrieved from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf

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Calmsley Hill City Farm (Formerly Fairfield City Farm) | Animal Farm, Functions, Sustainable Learning, Education | Sydney

Calmsley Hill City Farm (Formerly Fairfield City Farm) | Animal Farm, Functions, Sustainable Learning, Education | Sydney | HSIE Early Stage 1- Where do products come from? | Scoop.it
City Farm is an approximately 400 acre farm based attraction located less than an hour from the centre of Sydney's CBD. It's a fun day out for families and tourists alike and has facilities that cater for corporate functions and private parties as well as offering a wide range of excursions for Infants, Primary and High Schools.
Aaron Jolley's insight:

Calmsley Hill City Farm is a farm based attraction located in south-west Sydney. The farm offers excursions and tours for school groups. Tours are designed to meet HSIE syllabus outcomes and are focused on concepts such as what is produced on a farm and how farm animals and plants provide for people’s needs. The website provides teachers with a downloadable information and itinerary sheet outlining the activities students can participate in, general information about the tour and a list of items students will need to bring along with them on the day. This is very helpful resource for teachers as it helps in making preparation and organisation of the excursion easier. A risk assessment form is also available on the site to ensure that safety information is clearly provided to teachers and school staff prior to the excursion. Visiting a farm and providing opportunities for students to find out what comes from a farm allows them to discover what resources and products come from a farm besides food e.g. cotton, wool, timber.

 

Teaching activities that could be used to complement this learning experience may include providing opportunities for students to discuss, draw/paint and write about their observations. Also, students could compare the farm that they visited with other farms across the Australia, and then on a global scale. Ask students to identify similarities and differences between farms including, what type of farm they are, the animals or resources they have, the size and amount of workers.

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Where does bread come from?

Where does bread come from? | HSIE Early Stage 1- Where do products come from? | Scoop.it
Do you know where your bread comes from? Discover how many other foods can be made from wheat flour. This clip tells the...
Aaron Jolley's insight:

The following resource can be used by teachers to illustrate to students the multiple processes involved with making bread, from the growing of crops right through to the transportation of flour. The video clip provides students with a simple and easy to follow explanation of where bread, a product that most students eat at school, comes from. This then allows students to contrast and compare their own understanding of where bread comes from with the information depicted in the video. The website contains supporting material along with the video, including reflection questions and activities for before, during and after viewing.  Although the video is presented in an engaging and relevant way, it is almost 7 minutes in duration and therefore, could be watched in segments to maximise student engagement.

 

A teaching idea using this resource may involve students being organised into pairs and talking about where they think bread comes from before viewing. After watching the video, students can participate in a class discussion to identify where other products they use come from. This will build on the students' prior knowledge ensuring that the activity draws on their own personal experience. This is important in the construction of an “authentic learning experience” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.143). Assessment task ideas may include students cutting out pictures of products and pasting them in the column that corresponds to where they come from e.g. a bottle of milk and a cow.

 

This resource has curriculum links to the Science strand of:

Science Understanding: ACSSU002- Living things have basic needs, including food and water (Board of Studies NSW, 2006).

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2006). Science and Technology K-6: Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Cengage Learning: Australia.

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http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/go-bananas

Aaron Jolley's insight:

***Please copy and paste website link if not working.

 

These images make up a PowerPoint file found on the Oxfam UK website. They tell the story of the journey of a banana from planting in Saint Vincent in the Caribbean to being sold in a supermarket in the UK. This resource can be used to provide a global perspective to students by showing them not all of our resources are grown in our country and that many countries around the world export resources and products, such as bananas, to other countries. Therefore, students can gain an insight in the idea of a global marketplace and community and start to develop their “understanding of the complex social, economic and political links between people and the impact that changes have on others” (Curriculum Corporation, 2008, p.5). There are various other links on the website to lesson ideas and resources that teachers may find useful when teaching this topic from a global perspective, including a mapping activities.

 

Teaching ideas using this resource could include dividing the class into groups of three and giving each group one photo. Ask them to decide what is happening in it. Ask them to draw what they think might have happened to the banana before the stage shown in the picture, and what might happen afterwards. When they have finished, they can display their pictures as a 'time line' with the original photo. A teacher could use this resource as a lead in to other activities such as looking at various products around the classroom and finding out where they come from e.g. school shoes made in Taiwan. The class can then use a world map to plot the place where each item comes from. Such a task can illustrate to students that the products that we use in our everyday lives come from all over the world.

 

References:

 

Curriculum Corporation (2008). Global Perspectives: A statement on global education for Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation, Melbourne.

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Where do my meals come from? (5-8 years) - Food a fact of life

Where do my meals come from? (5-8 years) - Food a fact of life | HSIE Early Stage 1- Where do products come from? | Scoop.it
Aaron Jolley's insight:

This interactive resource provides students with a fun and engaging medium to express their understanding and knowledge of where different foods come from. Through matching various foods in their final product state to their origin, students can demonstrate and consolidate their understanding of how the products in their lives are the end result of a large production process. This resource could be used as an introduction to the topic as it provides a teacher with a method to gauge subject knowledge. The game involves dragging and dropping the correct producer next to the food that it has helped create. There are a number of incorrect options meaning that students will have to make a judgement before selecting. This are no time restrictions involved with this game and the answers are revealed at the end, meaning that students can complete the game at their own pace.

 

Ideally, this game should be projected onto an interactive whiteboard so that the whole class can participate in the activity. Individual students can be selected to come up to the board to have a turn. This allows the teacher to observe which individual students are able to identify the correct matches. The game requires students to use both written and visual literacy skills to make meaning out of the text. Such a multimodal text is a great way for students to develop their visual literacy skills, as understanding the messages that images convey has become a “wider aspect of how we communicate in our culture” (Callow, 1999, p.2).

 

References:

 

Callow, J. (1999) Reading the visual: An introduction. Image Matters- Visual Texts in the Classroom. Marrickville, NSW Primary English Teaching Association: 1-13.

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