HSIE in Early Stage 1
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HSIE in Early Stage 1
Explore a number of engaging resources to utilise with Early Stage 1 students when investigating 'the structure of students' families'.
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The Families of the World | Learn about how people live around the world.

The Families of the World | Learn about how people live around the world. | HSIE in Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Families of the World is a highly acclaimed award-winning educational video series documenting how children and their families live in 17 countries around the world
Bethany Wilshire's insight:

This website is an excellent resource tool for teachers to use as stimulus to formulate learning experiences around the topic: 'Families of the World'. This website provides information about video clips from a series by the same name, which explores the typical family structures and lives of over 50 families worldwide. Suitable for all ages, these videos are engaging and interesting, and allow students to delve deeply into the meaning of 'family' and how it changes depending on where you live. Furthermore, videos like these foster a global perspective amongst students, encouraging them to look beyond their personal, local and national borders. These videos could be selected to link in with other units of work concerning culture, food, flags, or anything of an international nature. They are a unique and engaging way to assist students to think beyond their personal lives, and start exploring concepts and family relationships on a global level. Showing one of these videos from a specific country to the class and organising a sister school from the same country, could be a fantastic opportunity for students to form penpal friendships through which they can learn more about family structures in other countries. This would develop their writing and communication skills, and potentially form the beginning of lifelong friendships. Most importantly, these resources will truly open the eyes of students to the greater meaning and importance of 'family'.

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Play & Learning for Kids

Play & Learning for Kids | HSIE in Early Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Our Family Values
Bethany Wilshire's insight:

This resource depicts a colourful poster detailing different moral values or house rules held by some families. Sharing this poster with Early Stage 1 students can be a great way to lead into a discussion on families and the role of different family members within their unique family formation. A fun and useful learning activity could be to ask students to go home and discuss with their family members the values that are important within their family unit. Asking students to write these down for homework will extend their writing skills and also give them a strong sense of ownership over this activity, as there is a basic ‘research’ element to it. Children would then be required to bring their list of family morals back in to class and spend a few lessons creating their very own ‘Family Values’ poster. These could be used as a News Item for the week, giving students an opportunity to share their family values with the class, and observe how they are similar or different to those of their peers. Displaying these posters around the classroom would also provide students with a sense of pride at seeing the end product on parade for all visitors to the classroom. The task as a whole also reiterates to students the importance of accepting and welcoming the different views and attitudes of members of their cohort. This inclusive attitude will help to foster a "supportive, collaborative learning environment" (Edutopia, 2013), which is paramount for cultivating an "emotionally safe classroom" (Edutopia, 2013).

 

Edutopia - What Works in Education (2013). Ten steps to better student engagement.

Retrieved 20 April, 2013 from http://www.edutopia.org/project-learning-teaching-strategies

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Family Echo - Free Online Family Tree Maker

Draw your printable family tree online. Free and easy to use, no login required. Add photos and share with your family. Import/export GEDCOM files.
Bethany Wilshire's insight:

This website is a fantastic tool to use with Early Stage 1 students to explore the concept of family members, family roles and family trees. As it requires satisfactory reading skills and basic typing capabilities, it may be a good opportunity for Kindergarten students to work with older student buddies. Working together they could create an accurate representation of the EL1 students' family, which could then be printed out and shared with the class. It would also encourage students to develop their basic research skills, as it would require them to discuss the particulars of extended family members with parents and loved ones. This activity could be built into a larger assignment, in which students are to cultivate basic family history details from their close and extended family members, in order to work towards presenting a brief family history overview as part of an end of term presentation. Parents could be invited to this presentation, and the family tree created using this website could be used as a prop or resource within this short speech. Using this resource as a basis on which to build a task and learning experience that is directly relevant to students and their families, makes it particularly engaging and special for students to reflect on for years to come.

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Family and kinship

Learn more about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kinship structures.
Bethany Wilshire's insight:

This Youtube clip gives a very brief visual and oral overview of indigenous Australian family structures. It is short and fast-moving enough to keep young students interested and engaged, whilst also explaining key facts surrounding the unique Aboriginal Kinship system. This clip could be the foundation of a lesson exploring the differences and similarities between traditional and contemporary Australian family structures. There is vocabulary throughout this clip that may be new to young students so it would be of utmost importance to clarify this before, during and after showing the clip to the class. Likewise, the key facts surrounding connections between various individuals in these systems can be a confusing concept for young non-indigenous students, so it would be important to clarify and explore this adequately. Students could be encouraged to work in small groups to explore a given traditional dreamtime story containing themes relating to 'family'. Within their small groups they could create a short role play of the story to present to the rest of the class. A resource and subsequence broader lesson like this challenges students’ preconceived notions of the archetypal family structure. This is paramount for their engagement and connection with the national Australian history, and their ability to relate to peers and individuals who come from backgrounds that are different to their own.  

 

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The Family Book by Todd Parr_0001.wmv

Film made for Instructional Technology graduate course for a WebQuest. Unable to find the book read by Todd Parr himself, so I made this in his honor. I do n...
Bethany Wilshire's insight:

'The Family Book' by Todd Parr is an engaging way to begin a unit of work on 'Families' with Early Stage 1 students. It is a charming book that demonstrates that families come in all different formations and arrangements. It allows students to explore the notion that whilst the nuclear family setup is common, it is by no means the reality for each and every family. The book provides an excellent stimulus for further study on a variety of themes and moral/ethical standpoints. This particular resource provides a reading of 'The Family Book' as a youtube clip, which would be beneficial if students need to reread the film individually or in small groups, after an initial class reading facilitated by the teacher. This resource could be used as a foundation on which students can address the different family formations present within their peer group. Students could explore the different family structures (ie number of children, married/not married, live in a house/apartment etc) and create a large class graph to depict the results. It would be important to be aware of any factors which may be of a sensitive or upsetting nature to individual students (ie students who have lost a parent or sibling), and thus this would need to be managed with care and empathy. This activity could be a nice way to help students to get to know each other in Term 1, and also encourage an inclusive and safe classroom environment.

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