HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home
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What is global education? | Global Education

What is global education? | Global Education | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home | Scoop.it
Rebecca Morris's insight:

 

The Global education website has been created by the Australian government in a bid to highlight the importance of educating children on global perspectives and, furthermore, to help teachers in achieving this goal. The website delivers novel and exciting ways to teach children about complex and controversial issues. Suggestions include using cartoons, storytelling and online games to develop knowledge and skills related to global issues. There is also an area named the “sharing space,” which is a place for teachers to “share” links, materials and resources related to educating children about global perspective.

 

The website offers an array of Teaching Resources that can be utilized to embed global perspective across the NSW HSIE syllabus. The section “Who are the families of the world?” offers a fantastic range of ideas to educate Kindergarten students about the diversity of families from around the world and, furthermore, on how roles and responsibilities can vary in different family units. This aligns with one of the indicators under the Social Systems and Structure strand. Supporting these ideas is an abundance of materials; there are various activity sheets and games that can be printed off, as well as links to videos and images of families from around the world. Key areas of discussion have also been outlined which can be used to get students to deepen their understanding about families throughout the world. These ideas and resources would be invaluable to a HSIE teacher looking to embed a global perspective in to lessons about families and different roles and responsibilities that exist in each.

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▶ Little Human Planet S01E16 Helping and Playing - YouTube

Rebecca Morris's insight:

 

In this episode of Little Human Planet, the Cbeebies team travel around the world to see how children help their families and play in different countries.

 

This video gives students a simple understanding of how children their own age live in different countries around the world. It identifies the different roles that children of a similar age carry out on a daily basis to help their families. It portrays young children in Brazil mixing food and picking red corn on the cob, Mongolia picking sticks to help build a fire, Kenya collecting water for the animals, Mali collecting mud to make a wall, amongst others. It then shows children from around the world playing, which demonstrates that although their daily routines may be different to children in Australian classrooms, they still love to play.

 

This video could be used to introduce the idea of roles and responsibilities to students. Following the video, the teacher could lead a guided discussion with the following points in mind;

 

·      What does responsibility mean?

·      What responsibilities did the children in the video have?

·      What responsibilities do you have at home?

·      What responsibilities do you have in the classroom?

·      Are the responsibilities of the children in the video different to yours? How?

·      Do you have anything in common with the children in the video?

 

Activity Ideas

 

1)    Following the class discussion, the students could be split in to small groups. Half of the groups could be asked to draw and label a poster of their responsibilities at home and the other half could do the same for their responsibilities in the classroom. An extension from this would be to get the students (in their group) to stand up at the front of the class and present their poster. The teacher could then film this and make a video similar to The Little Planet for the students to watch.

 

There is a whole series on YouTube following the Cbeebies team meeting children from around the world. Each episode has different aims and discussion points. These would be extremely useful for other aspects of the HSIE ES1 syllabus. 

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Welcome

Welcome | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home | Scoop.it
Rebecca Morris's insight:

 

Tom Tom is a heart-warming story about a small boy, Tom Tom, who lives with his large extended family in an Aboriginal community in the Top End of the Northern Territory. The story follows Tom Tom as he plays and swims and dives with his sisters and brothers and cousins. He has lunch with his Granny Annie and spends the night with Granny May and grandfather Joe in. He goes to pre-school, where he makes up stories and paints pictures about his own world (making and cooking damper and painting a picture of the black cockatoos). The story highlights the importance of family and interconnectedness in Aboriginal society. It also demonstrates the different roles that each family member has, including Tom Tom himself.

 

This book provides children with the opportunity to see the great similarities that exist between Indigenous children and themselves, and also develop an understanding of the differences which exist in the ways people live. It is also a good way to start to get students to think about their own families and the roles and responsibilities they have in their family unit.

 

Before reading the book, the teacher should discuss the story by telling the students what the book is about (explain that the story is about a boy who is a similar age and that he lives in the Top End of the Northern Territory). It would then be a good idea to look at a map of Australia and find out where this is.

 

After reading the book, the following points could be discussed;

 

·      Who is in Tom Tom’s family?

·      What does he do with each member of his family?

·      What are Tom’s responsibilities in his family?

 

Following this, encourage the students to discuss the above points, but in relation to their own families and selves. Then move on to discuss;

 

·      How is Tom Tom's family similar to yours?

·      How is it different?

·      How is Tom Tom's day different to yours?

·      Is it the same in any way?

 

Activity Ideas

 

 1)  Get the students to draw pictures of themselves and their family members, labeling each person. Cut out the pictures and stick them on ice-lolly sticks to make puppets. The students could then work in groups to create a puppet show depicting their usual daily routine, (going to school, playing with friends etc.), including the roles that they carry out at home (helping Mum cook, helping Dad wash-up, tidying away toys etc.).

 

2)  Put the students in to groups and get them to think more about the similarities and differences between

a. Their families

b. Daily routines

with Tom Tom’s (following on from the class discussion).

 

Then give them an A3 sheet of paper, which has been divided in half. Get half of the groups to draw the similarities and differences   between their families and Tom Tom's family. (Similarities should be on one half of the page and differences on the other.)

Get the other half of the groups to do the same, but for daily routines. Present poster to the class in groups. Make a display on the classroom wall of the posters.

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If I Were Queen of the World

If I Were Queen of the World | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; roles, rights and responsibilities in the classroom and at home | Scoop.it
A little girl's dream of glory, with enchanting full-color picturesIf I were queen of the whole wide world, I'd have one hundred lollipops a day and never have to share. But sometimes I'd let my little brother have a lick or two". So begins a small girl's glorious fantasy of being queen of the world. She'd ride the scariest roller coaster at the fair one hundred times. But she'd get off once in a while to keep her little brother company on the flying elephants. Or, since she could fly just by spreading her arms, she'd sometimes take him on her back. She'd even let him sit near her and pretend to be a king. This charming, childlike text, illustrated with delightful humor by a well-loved artist, speaks directly to any young child with a sibling -- and to anyone who has dreams of glory!
Rebecca Morris's insight:

 

If I were Queen of the World can be used to introduce the notion of rules to students when they first begin Kindergarten, as this concept is likely to be completely novel.

 

The book demonstrates that the absence of rules can have potentially detrimental effects. In the story the protagonist (a little girl) pretends to be the “queen” and is very powerful and self-indulgent. She loves her little brother yet she still treats him unfairly and is selfish with her belongings. Students in Kindergarten should be able to understand and relate to this type of behavior. 

 

Before reading the story, the teacher could encourage the students to make predictions about what they think the book will be about. One method of doing this would be to display the cover of the book at the front of the class (on an OHP or interactive whiteboard). Then encourage the students to work in pairs to make their predictions. After a short discussion, the teacher should elicit suggestions from each pair, also asking students their reasoning for their specific predictions.

 

After reading the story the teacher could start a class discussion by posing the following questions to the students:

 

·      What is a rule? (Highlight the importance of rules being fair to everyone by giving an example of a fair and unfair rule that they can relate to)

·      Why are rules important? (Highlight that we have leaders and laws to keep people safe and happy)

·      Who are the leaders in the school (teachers, the principal, TAs etc)

·      Were the rules the little girl in the book made fair?

·     Why were they not fair?

 

Activity Idea:

 

1)   Show students common symbols that we see in every day life, which signify a rule everyone must follow (stop sign, traffic lights etc). An extension of this could be to make the signs out of cardboard. Then take the class outside and get them to run around acting as cars. Emphasize that the cardboard symbols signify rules that must be obeyed for safety reasons and that when the Stop sign/red traffic light is displayed they must stop running immediately and may only resume when the green traffic light is shown.

 

Assessment strategy:

 

1)   Ask the students, in pairs, to discuss what they would do if they were King or Queen for the day. Following this, ask each pair to share with the class their most important rule. This allows the teacher to assess whether every student has understood the concept of a rule. Write each suggestion on the board. Once everyone has given a suggestion, work together as a class to come up with a list of the 10 most important class rules that everyone should follow to ensure a safe and happy environment. This list can then be made in to a big poster and displayed on the wall for everyone in the class to see.

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The Great Big Book of Families: Amazon.co.uk: Mary Hoffman, Ros Asquith: Books

The Great Big Book of Families

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The Great Big Book of Families: Amazon.co.uk: Mary Hoffman, Ros Asquith: Books
Rebecca Morris's insight:

 

The Great Big Book of Families depicts family diversity and can be utilized to promote a sense of inclusiveness in the classroom. The story portrays a range of different families and their lives together, helping children expand their understanding of the world. Hoffman starts the book by introducing a “traditional family" and then moves on to show a range of “non-traditional” families; multi-cultural and multi-racial families; single parent families; families headed by lesbian or gay parents, grandparents, foster parents; families with many siblings or cousins or great-grandparents etc. Beyond the basic family unit, the book also explores jobs (sometimes only one parent works, sometimes both do, sometimes parents are out of work), school (most children go to school but some are homeschooled), food (most buy food at a grocery store but some grow their own), residences (some live in big houses, some in apartments, some don't have a home), hobbies and how different families express themselves and share (or don't share) their feelings.

 

Every child that enters the classroom is going to have a different family structure, therefore it is important to educate children about these diversities at a young age, in order to promote understanding and acceptance.

 

After reading the book, areas of discussion could involve:

·      What makes a family?

·      How are the families in the book similar to your family

·      How are they different?

 

Activity Ideas:

 

1)   Ask the students to draw and label their own families. Get them to include extended family members (grandparents, cousins, aunties/uncles) that they are close to.

An extension from this could be to get them to draw each family member’s roles at home (cooking, cleaning, ironing, taking the rubbish out etc.) around the portraits.

Use the drawings to create a classroom great big book of families. Display this somewhere on the classroom wall so that the students can look through it whenever they like.

 

2)   The book ends by introducing the idea of family trees. Therefore, another activity idea would be to give the students a family tree template and ask them to complete it.

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