Places in our immediate environment
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Places in our immediate environment
Early Stage 1 resources for HSIE: CCES1 - places in their immediate environment
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Kindergarten Maps

Kindergarten Maps | Places in our immediate environment | Scoop.it
Use Rosie's Walk by Pat Hutchins to introduce kindergarten maps to your students
Meredith's insight:

This resource outlines lessons ideas using the picture book Rosie’s Walk (Hutchins, 1971) to introduce kindergarten to mapping. Beginning with a familiar narrative means students have an existing field of knowledge to begin to learn new geographical concepts (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011). The web resource uses a lead up activity where students use blocks and manipulatives and draw these from the side and the top to begin to understand viewpoint and the topographical concept of birds-eye view. This is a great link to spatial mathematics and prepares students for further map activities.  Other lead up activities might include exploring examples of maps such as treasure maps in stories or actual maps of the local area.

 

After becoming familiar with the story, students can identify the places that Rosie visits during her walk. Using basic topographic symbols for roads, buildings and natural features the class map Rosie’s walk. This activity would work equally well drawn on large sheets of paper or using the interactive whiteboard. During this “engage stage” of inquiry (Taylor et al, 2012) students engage with the features and symbols used in simple mapping and begin to develop understandings of position and direction. Activities to follow this would see students map their classrooms and then their whole school working in pairs and small groups during the “explore stage” of inquiry (Taylor, et al, 2012). The maps produced allow teachers to assess students’ beginning understanding of using maps to represent places in their environment.

 

Through these mapping activities students are working with the sequence of events in Rosie’s Walk. This is an excellent opportunity to link to the explicit teaching of narrative structure. Specific vocabulary is introduced to do with mapping and position (such as “view”, “viewpoint”, “birds eye view”, “near”, “behind”), linking literacy and numeracy concepts.

 

Reference List:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia.

Hutchins, P. (1970). Rosie's Walk. Harmondsworth: Puffin.

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., & Boon, D. (2012). Place and time: Explorations in teaching geography and history. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.

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Glebe Public School | Glebe Public School History

Glebe Public School | Glebe Public School History | Places in our immediate environment | Scoop.it
Meredith's insight:

Local historian Max Solling has provided a detailed history of Glebe Public School (GPS) from its very beginnings in 1858 through to the 1980s. There is a wealth of information about schooling throughout the years and colourful personal histories of people who taught and attended GPS. School is a significant place for students and this resource provides opportunity for them to learn about the history of their school and the experience of students before them. Students gain an understanding of their own and local heritage through the places in their immediate environment (NSW Board of Studies, 2006).

 

Teachers can use the information in the school history to plan experiences exploring the schooling experiences of children in the past, using Anderson’s revised taxonomy (Krathwohl, Anderson & Bloom, 2001 cited in Taylor et al, 2012). For example: students can learn about what school was like in the early 20th century up to now; show their understanding by plotting an annotated class timeline of the GPS schooling experience; and have the opportunity to analyse the information to compare their own experience to those of previous students. Teachers can use dramatic devices such as teacher-in-role to act as a time traveller to the early 20th century finding out what school is like and students can role walk as students from that time to evaluate the experience of students in the past (Ewing, 2004). Finally, students can create their own piece of writing (with the class and independently) about schooling in the past and present (English K-6 Syllabus Outcome WES1.9; NSW Board of Studies, 2007).

 

Reference List:

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and It's Environment: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

NSW Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., & Boon, D. (2012). Place and time: Explorations in teaching geography and history. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | Places in our immediate environment | Scoop.it
Meredith's insight:

This online video introduces students to Lucy, a nine-year-old Ugandan girl. The video shows a day in the life of Lucy as she goes about her chores to help the family earn a living. Lucy’s daily life is based around her home, crops and limited services in the local area such as a nearby clean water pump. The website also includes supporting resources such as maps which help students locate Uganda in relation to Australia, Africa and the world. Introducing a global perspective within a unit on local area means that students can begin to develop an understanding of other’s situations and situate their own place within the wider world (Curriculum Corporation, 2005).

 

Teachers can use this video to identify and discuss important places in our own and other cultures and consider our responsibilities to care for those places. After watching the video, students can participate in a think-pair-share about the places in Lucy’s immediate environment. The teacher can use a Venn diagram to identify graphically (either written up or on an interactive whiteboard) the places in Lucy’s immediate environment and the places in the students’ own environment. The class can discuss similarities and differences between the places listed. One difference is there is no school in Lucy’s places and this prompts discussion with students about the reasons that Lucy does not go to school such as poverty and hunger. This discussion not only helps students to develop their knowledge of other cultures  (NSW Board of Studies, 2006) but also their understanding of global issues such as inequalities between people in different locations (Taylor et al, 2012).

 

Focusing on the home in particular, students can make a chart about the things that they do, and that Lucy does, to help their family care for their home. Students can draw maps of their own home comparing them to a class map of Lucy’s home. Linking with mathematics the teacher can help students to mark out (in a suitable place in the playground) the approximate size of Lucy’s hut and cornfield to contrast to the students’ own homes. These comparisons provide examples of concrete experiences to help young students to develop their “zoom lens approach” to learning about the world (Geographical Association, 2008 cited in Taylor et al, 2012)

 

Reference List:

Curriculum Corporation. (2005). Global perspectives: a statement on global education for Australian schools. Retrieved from http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/global_perspectives_statement_2005_web.pdf

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and It's Environment: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., & Boon, D. (2012). Place and time: Explorations in teaching geography and history. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.

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Self-guided walks in Glebe NSW 2037 Australia

Self-guided walks in Glebe NSW 2037 Australia | Places in our immediate environment | Scoop.it
Self-guided walks in Glebe NSW 2037 Australia. Walk and explore the many facets of the fascinating and historic suburb of Glebe
Meredith's insight:

The Glebe Walks site details several self-guided walks through the historic suburb of Glebe. Students have the opportunity to explore the geography and history of the area, examining built and natural environments and learning about significant places in the local area. Each walk is around two kilometres and the stops along the way have photos and details of built, natural and historic features.

 

Following introductory mapping activities students could now explore the built and natural features in their local area. Teachers could begin with an introductory activity teaching students the terms “built” and “natural” features of the environment and introduce the concept of heritage. In small groups, students can sort and categorise photos of the local area (collected through Glebe Walks or an online digital collection such as Trove) accordingly, discussing and demonstrating their understanding of the concepts.

 

Students can then undertake their own Glebe Walk. Place-based learning like this provides students with rich learning, connecting cognitive and experiential domains (Taylor et al, 2012). Each walk can be taken physically, a teacher-planned walking excursion, or virtually, through the website, ensuring every student is included in the experience (Foreman, 2011; NSW Department of Education & Communities, 2009). Teachers can use the vast amount of information to plan countless geographical and historical walks appropriate for Early Stage 1 to explore significant places in the local area, for example “The Waterfront Walk” and “The Rocks of Glebe Point” are of particular interest to students identifying built and natural features.

 

Students can draw upon these experiences to contribute to a class map of the local area added to throughout a unit on local significant places and writing about their observations. Students could also demonstrate their learning in oral presentation through a related news topic for the week where students select their favourite place in the local area and talk about a natural or built feature there. (English K-6 Syllabus Outcomes WES1.9, TES1.1, TES1.2; NSW Board of Studies, 2007.)

 

Reference List:

Foreman, P. (2011). Inclusion in action (3rd ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning Australia Pty Limited.

National Library of Australia. (2013). Trove Digital Collection.   Retrieved 9 September, 2011, from http://trove.nla.gov.au/

NSW Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

NSW Department of Education & Communities. (2009). Excursions Policy.  Retrieved from https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/student_admin/excursions/excursion_pol/PD20040010.shtml.

Taylor, T., Fahey, C., Kriewaldt, J., & Boon, D. (2012). Place and time: Explorations in teaching geography and history. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia. 

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Aboriginal People and Place

Aboriginal People and Place | Places in our immediate environment | Scoop.it
Thematic history of Aboriginal People and Place
Meredith's insight:

This resource explores Aboriginal people and place, a history of Sydney from Indigenous perspectives. Created through the City of Sydney History Program the histories on this site have been written by Indigenous authors and commentators and information provided by many Indigenous people and organisations. The website is an appropriate Indigenous resource to use in the classroom due to it’s accurate and authentic representation of Indigenous information and history and is endorsed by the NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group (NSW AECG) (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003).

 

In the process of understanding Indigenous heritage teachers should be aware that some Aboriginal students do not necessarily know about their personal histories as these can be difficult to trace. With this in mind, students should be encouraged to know and respect the language group in which the school is situated (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2005).The Glebe area is situated in the ancestral lands of the Cadigal people of the Dharug language group. 

 

Teachers can use the information from the Barani site to introduce the Indigenous history of Sydney to their students, incorporating students’ own Indigenous and other cultural backgrounds. Teachers could arrange opportunities for a representative of the local Aboriginal community to speak to the class about Indigenous histories of the local area, sites important to the community and the concept of caring for place (NSW Board of Studies, 2006).

 

In a whole class discussion students can consider their own connection to place talking about places that are special to them such as home, school, or parks. Students can write about these special places and how they care for them (English Syllabus Outcomes WES1.9; NSW Board of Studies, 2007). Students can also apply their new knowledge to: build a 3D model of their own special place; and add to the class historical timeline and local maps of Glebe (NSW Board of Studies, 2006). Within the scope of this unit on local area students will be able to consider multiple perspectives and voices of the history and local places of Glebe (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011).

 

Reference List:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia.

NSW Board of Studies. (2006). Human Society and It's Environment: K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

NSW Board of Studies. (2007). English K-6 syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies NSW.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2003). Aboriginal education K-12: Resource guide.  Sydney, NSW: Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate.

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2005). Caring for place, caring for country: teacher's booklet.  Darlinghurst: NSW Department of Education and Training Retrieved from http://www.gibberagon-e.schools.nsw.edu.au/resources/Resources/caringplace.pdf.

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