Family Origins Early Stage 1 HSIE
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Thinking Globally | Global Education: What's in a name?

Thinking Globally | Global Education: What's in a name? | Family Origins Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it
Bronte Rowe's insight:

Funded by the Australian government, the Global Education website provides teachers with resources and ideas for adopting global perspectives into the classroom. One of their main publications is Browett & Ashman’s (2008) Thinking Globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom. It provides a framework for adding a global perspective into the classrooms of younger children and also ways of integrating it with the HSIE syllabus. It also provides many lesson and resource ideas for almost all aspects of the Early Stage 1, Stage 1 HSIE syllabus.

This idea is adapted from the “My Name” activity which can be found in Browett& Ashman (2008, p.56). Have children write down their last name (family name) onto pieces of paper, using coloured paper or coloured pencils. As a class, brainstorm how people can find out information about their last name and some questions they could ask about their name. Some example inquiry questions could be “What language does your name come from?”, “what does your name mean?”, and “where does this name originate (come) from?”. Children can use the internet to find out, ask family members or consult naming books.

When the children have answers to their questions, most importantly where the name originates from, have them identify the country or area on a word map. Put a pushpin into that region on the map and try coloured string or wool between the child’s name (placed around the world map) and the pin on the map. Doing this for each child, provides them with a link to somewhere else on the globe but also to other children, realising that there are similarities and differences between families and where they come from.

 

Browlett, J. & Ashman, G., (2008). Thinking globally: Global perspectives in the early years classroom. Carlton South, Australia: Curriculum Corporation.

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Exploring Families: Discussion dice

Bronte Rowe's insight:

Teaching identity is not just helping students create a sense of self, but about accepting and understanding other peoples’ sense of self, identity and culture. It is about “how cultural differences lead groups to experience and interpret things different” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.296) but also how all peoples have similarities. It is about being confident in yourself and your identity and understanding others’. This resource is a simple way of getting students to discuss and identify cultural/family differences between themselves. Using the ‘discussion dice’ in small groups also makes the thought of sharing things about themselves (and even talking aloud) easier for many students, especially if the teacher has arranged the groups specifically to maximise talk and confidence. Students are supported to ask questions about their family heritage and therefore origins (where their family came from) and recognise the differences between their family and their classmates’. It is almost a simple inquiry

To further this activity, as a class, students could brainstorm questions which they want to know about their family and then, with assistance, these can be written onto the dice and possibly taken home.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Waves of Migration: Stories

Waves of Migration: Stories | Family Origins Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it
waves of migration, rooftop animation, lightshow
Bronte Rowe's insight:

Invite family members to come and talk to students about the origins of their family; where they were born, why their family moved and to bring in mementos/heirlooms from their country. Discuss reasons why families did/do move to Australia, and other countries such as America. The link is to an exhibit at the Australian National Maritime Museum. It would be interesting for students to see that other people, particularly other children have moved to Australia and an excursion to the Museum could provide that, especially the Child Migrant section. You would need to explain what migration is before the excursion and relate the definition to the experiences of family members. Another activity you could do beforehand would be to explore online the “Stories from the Collection” page, compare reasoning for migrating. An assessment task could be to create a picture-story where they draw the events of someone’s migration to Australia

When on the excursion, you would must supervise and guide your students. You will need to explain the stories in ways which the students can relate to; similar to their families story, or a class member’s story. (Something you could do with older students is to have them find particular people at the exhibit and do a research task on their story and events relating to it).

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Aboriginal Australia: Identity and understanding

Aboriginal Australia: Identity and understanding | Family Origins Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it
Find out about the history of Aboriginal people, who have been living continuously in Australia for more than 50,000 years.
Bronte Rowe's insight:

As a New South Wales Department of Education and Communities publication, it should have passed the prescribed selection criteria (New South Wales Department of Education and Training, 2003) to be considered an appropriate teacher resource. This site provides details about Aboriginal Australia in simple, straightforward language which would be helpful for teachers who are unsure and possibly concerned about teaching their students about Aboriginal Australia. For the topic of family origins, including country of origin it is important for students to realise that Aboriginal Australians are the original inhabitants of Australia and that 2.5% of the population identify as Indigenous. That means that almost 3 people out 100 identify as Indigenous Australians.  Having representative from your local Aboriginal community come and speak to your class will provide your students with an insight into what it means to identify as an Aboriginal Australian. For example, the connection with the land, the relationships with extended family and the overall sense of identity. As the focus is origins, cultural stories from the local Aboriginal community can provide an understanding of the origin of the peoples and the country.

A possible assessment of students understanding could be visual representations of the stories which they heard from the visitors in the classroom. For example, the drawing of a Dreaming story or a personal story from told by one the visitors. Possibly followed by a discussion of how their story or the story of a family member compares with the one they drew.

 

New South Wales Department of Education and Training, Professional Support and Curriculum Directorate (2003). The Aboriginal education k-12 resource guide. Retrieved 2014 from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/schoollibraries/assets/pdf/aboriginalresourceguide.pdf.

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Travel the World from Your Classroom: Free iPad apps for virtual field trips

Travel the World from Your Classroom: Free iPad apps for virtual field trips | Family Origins Early Stage 1 HSIE | Scoop.it

"Not every school has the resources necessary to take their students on an airplane . . . or spaceship. The iPad can bring the world to your students' fingertips in ways never before possible. Many national parks and museums have apps designed for onsite visitors. These navigational tools are also great for classrooms who can't make the trip. In fact, a variety of free apps can be used as virtual field trips so that children can travel the world from your classroom!"


Via John Evans, Kate ferguson-patrick
Bronte Rowe's insight:

“The most powerful and positive learning outcomes occur in those contexts where students’ knowledge and interest are well matched to the nature of the learning task” (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, pp. 104-5). Resources for younger children need to be meaningful but something which they can access easily. My idea for this resource is to use the Sphere 360° Photography App to virtually explore where the students’ families are from. Firstly, the teacher would need to ask the students where they were born, because it is highly relevant and students tend to be more engaged when learning is about them.  Then open up the discussion to include where parents and grandparents were born; which town/city and especially which country they were born in. It doesn’t matter if they children are incorrect or are unsure of where their parents/grandparents are born because the focus of this exercise is to discuss different places in the world families have come from. It could be a good idea to write down the names of students, which family member and where they were born (i.e. Gregory- Grandmother, Switzerland). This gives the students some vocabulary relating to place and family which they can refer back to. This discussion is necessary to get the students thinking and engaged.  Use the app to “visit” these countries, inform the students that they are going on an overseas trip to where their mother/father/grandfather/grandmother/etc. were born!

 

McInerney, D.M. & McInerney, V. (2010). Educational psychology: Constructing learning. (5th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.

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Blake Fetty's curator insight, September 3, 2013 2:42 AM

Could be awesome for task-based learning... "Voy a tomar un viaje a... vamos a.... etc..."

Dave Renshaw's curator insight, April 10, 2015 8:32 AM

ICT continues to be a growing medium in the pedagogical toolbox of teachers. Johnson and Gilbert (in Gilbert & Hoepper. 2014) agree in stating that 'ICT provide unprecedented opportunities for engaging students in learning in new ways' (p158). They further this notion by stating that ICT resources enable teachers 'to do things that are not otherwise possible and leading to better teaching' (p158).

 

This resource (with particular attention to Sphere) could be incorporated with an IWB that supports AirPlay (or any software the supports mirroring of iPads) for the teacher to display photographs of different countries, cities and even homes both around the world, including right here in Australia. The teacher can connect with the homes and origins of the children and their families which will make learning personal and engaging for the students. This will make the task authentic and learning meaningful for them. Motivation and engagement with tasks has been shown to increase when it is interesting or enjoyable for the individual (Ryan & Deci. 2000). Whilst viewing an image, students are provided with an opportunity 'to discuss their own family, including family members, household tasks and what adult members do for children' (Board of Studies, NSW. 1999. p31). The students can also be given opportunity to talk about their heritage, and whether they have history of migration to Australia in their family or even just simply talk about the changes in their neighbourhood or if they have ever moved house.

 

Use of the ICT technology can create some excitement and engagement around a simple activity such as talking about their home and their heritage.

 

 

 

Board of Studies, NSW (1999). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 units of work.

Sydney: B.O.S. Retrieved from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/wcm/connect/1419e875-2290-415f-8add-7440c5ff3188/k6hsie_unitsofwork.pdf?MOD=AJPERES

 

Johnson, N.F. & Gilbert. (2014). Using information and communication technologies. In Gilbert, R. & Hoepper. B. (2014). Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences. History, Geography, Economics and Citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. Fifth Edition. Melbourne: Cengage. (Chapter 8).

 

Ryan, R.M., & Deci, E.L. (2000) Intrinsic and extrinsic motivation: Classic definitions and new directions. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 54-67.