HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution
10 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

Reference List

Reference List

Amy Leahy's insight:

Bobis, J., Anderson, J., Martin, A., Way, J. (2011). A model for mathematics instruction to enhance student motivation and engagement. In D.J. Brahier (Eds.), Motivation and disposition: pathways to learning mathematics - 73rd  Yearbook, (pp. 35-38). Reston, US: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

 

 

Clay, M. M. (1991). Introducing a new storybook to you readers. The reading teacher, 45(4), 264.

 

 

Connolly, M. J. (2009). Guardian of the rivers. Retrieved from Kullilla Art website: http://www.kullillaart.com.au/default.aspPageID=50&n=The+Guardian+of+the+Rivers

 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching humanities and social sciences: History, geography, economics & citizenship in the Australian Curriculum. 5th edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia. 68- 157.

 

 

Lewis, R. (n.d.). A study guide. Retrieved from Twelve Canoes website:

    http://www.12canoes.com.au/downloads/studyguide/Twelve_Canoes_Study     ; _Guide.pdf

 

 

Mascolo, M. F. (2009). Beyond student-centred and teacher-centred pedagogy: Teaching and learning as guided participation. Pedagogy and the human sciences,1(1), 3.

 

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs. (2008). Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for young Australians. Retrieved from:

      http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources/national_declaration_on_the_educational_goals_for_young_australians.pdf           ;

 

 

 

NSW DET, (2002). Talking identity: Teacher’s handbook. Ryde: NSW DET.

 

 

United Nations, (2013). Water quality. Retrieved from:

        http://www.unwater.org/fileadmin/user_upload/watercooperation2013/doc     ; /Factsheets/water_quality.pdf

 

 

 

Volunteer Abroad in Africa, (2012). Schools linking program for Africa, Canada, UK, USA and Australia Schools. Retrieved from:

          http://volunteerabroadinafrica.wordpress.com/2012/05/23/schools-linking-       ; program-for-africa-canada-uk-u-s-a-australia-schools/

 

 

 

World Vision, (2012). School resources: Why is clean water important? Retrieved from:

          http://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/School_Resources/Teacher_s_Not      ; es_-_Why_is_clean_water_important.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

:: AMSA Kids ::

:: AMSA Kids :: | HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution | Scoop.it
Amy Leahy's insight:

Australian Maritime Safety Authority for Kids

 

This website is designed to educate kids about protecting Australian waterways from pollution. It’s an interactive, educational page with an informative animated movie, word games, and litter clean-up games. The multimedia approach provides an engaging platform for learning that students will enjoy and has varying levels of difficulties so that all students of Stage Two can participate (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.68). The use of digital technologies offers great potential for learning and has significant relevance in contemporary society (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 157).

 

Teaching idea:

This website could be used in two ways: class learning and independent learning.  The site comes with a few suggestions for teachers that could be implemented for class activities such as experiments, or this following idea could be utilised also. In order to scaffold the learning that they are aiming to activate in their students, teachers need to establish a knowledge base for them that the students are able to extend on during independent learning. Giving the students a factual basis for the topic would be an obvious start such as common pollutants, how marine life may be affected by water pollution, and prevention methods e.g. a game of categories, or bingo to consolidate their knowledge base in a fun, interactive way. During independent sessions on the website students should have pre-prepared worksheets and activities as work sample. A homework idea is a written overview of the movie clip on the site based on how to clean up oil spills. This topic could also be incorporated into an excursion to the Aquarium for experiential learning (Mascolo, 2009, p.3) to give students the opportunity to see various types of marine life in healthy waters and learn about the various ways the animals are protected and cared for, adding a more personal element to the plight of such animals in polluted waters. This personal touch promotes deep and authentic learning that extends basic meanings and concepts and to generate understanding (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 69).

 

Assessment idea:

A research project based on the effects of oil spills on marine life, and litter in waterways and how to combat these issues to ensure healthy waterways. Their findings could be presented in news describing what they discovered and how they found it out- an emphasis on inquiry.

 

 Literacy idea:

The website contains a number of literacy activities; a word jumble, a word search, ‘Guess the marine creature’ game that requires students to identify marine animals and write them correctly to gain points, and a ‘Did you know’ list of water pollution facts that requires intermediate literacy skills to read and comprehend.

 

Numeracy idea:

The ‘Protect our seas game’ requires the student to find and dispose of the rubbish in the ocean. It is a game that requires basic numeracy skills as you count down the number of pieces of rubbish remaining until the seas are clean. To extend students further homework activities could include identifying the number of ways they see people in their neighbourhood and home doing things that might harm waterways e.g. blowing leaves into the gutter, pouring oil down the sink etc. and estimating how many things people do daily that impact upon the waterways- divide their findings between the number of people they identified and then multiply by the population of their school/their extended family/the nation etc.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

Twelve Canoes

Twelve Canoes | HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution | Scoop.it

The Swamp

Amy Leahy's insight:

The Swamp is a video on the 12 Canoes website. Whilst specifically about the Yolngu people of Arnhem Land, this website is a solid foundation for developing an understanding of the indigenous people of Australia. The swamp is a part of them; it is nourishment for their souls and food for their stomachs; it is their beginnings; it is alive like they are alive; it is their culture (clip). Aboriginal people are inextricably linked to the workings of their environment (NSW DET, 2002, p. 77). This video highlights how their relationship with water changed with the arrival of white men and how modern attitudes result in the polluting their swamp and threaten their historical, cultural, and economic relationship with it (Lewis, n.d., p.11).

 

Teaching idea:

Students watch the video as part of a unit on water pollution. [N.B. This video not only demonstrates the relationship between environments and people, but also links to both the Cultures strand of HSIE (Aboriginal studies) and the Social Systems and Structures strand, so the viewing could also tie in with these studies]. Throughout the viewing they could fill in a worksheet that is designed to highlight the centrality of water to the Aboriginal people. For example, the worksheet could have facts that the students need to number in order of appearance and then make connections between each link. The connection lines would intersect numerous times conveying the interconnected central nature of water/the swamp.  After the viewing the teacher could arrange for a representative from a NSW AECG to come and speak to the students about water in the Dreamtime to reinforce what has been presented in the video; their special connection to the land and the negative impact of ‘White Men’ on this connection. This would also provide the students with the opportunity to ask questions concerning the clip and ensure that they receive informed, culturally sensitive answers. A story suggestion is The Guardian of the Rivers- The Rainbow Snake (Connolly, 2009). The teacher could also ask the representative to discuss the Aboriginal artwork that appears at the beginning of the video and explain the meanings behind the images chosen which could potentially filter into a future art lesson. The Swamp also lends itself to an excursion to Penrith Lakes Environmental Education Centre to learn about the impacts of multiple eras of occupancy. A homework activity idea to consolidate students’ understanding of the importance of the swamp to the Aboriginal people and the value they place on it could be to have the students list places that are special to them and describe why. For guidance the teacher could give an example- My home is special to me because… it feels/smells/looks like etc. This multi-layered approach to this unit promotes deep and authentic learning and higher order thinking (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.69), allowing for a variety of learning types through a digital presentation, classroom discussion, verbal presentation, worksheet, independent learning through homework, and experiential learning through an excursion (Mascolo, 2009, p. 3).  The excursion in particular provides connectedness to life beyond school, providing relevance and grounding for the information learnt (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 69).

 

Assessment task idea:

Informal assessment- work samples from the students including their worksheet and homework- check grammar, punctuation. Did the student understand the task?

Formal assessment- project based on their accumulation of Dreamtime information and the impact of white settlement, and excursion knowledge e.g. posters depicting the inextricable link between the Aboriginal people and their environment and the impact of white settlement on this relationship. The excursion would serve to consolidate this knowledge and aid in this project.

 

Literacy strategy:

The project and homework incorporate literacy, as students need to explain what they’ve understood and write about things that are special to them. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

A Day in the Life of Urban Creek | NSW Environment & Heritage

A Day in the Life of Urban Creek | NSW Environment & Heritage | HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution | Scoop.it
Amy Leahy's insight:

This resource is an activity designed for primary students by the NSW Government Environment and Heritage to illustrate the multitude of pollutants that end up in waterways at the hands of human activity. It is a story that has each student in the class playing a role (the link has 24 characters, however this could be altered accordingly), and each of them represent a typical person or place in a town e.g. an electrician, a picnicker, a water-skier, a school etc. Each character has a pollutant to add to the water that is typical of their role e.g. a school adds litter, the water-skier adds oil. The teacher has a big clear tank with clean water in it (e.g. fish tank) and the students add the pollutants one at a time whilst someone in the class narrates the story. The point of the exercise is to visually represent how damaging pollutants are to waterways. This exercise harnesses the benefits of kinaesthetic learning and is a fun and interactive way to learn. It is important that learning reveals things about the world that were previously unknown to students (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014), and that the activity draws on the background knowledge of the subject to make it relevant and accessible for the student (Clay, 1991). This activity does both as it utilises the societal knowledge of students by setting it in a town and having roles that the students can identify with, and it visually reveals the potentially previously unknown gravity and intensity of water pollution in everyday life.

 

Teaching idea:

I would recommend that it is an appropriate way to finish a unit of work on water pollution. At the end of a unit of work, all students will have the necessary content knowledge to appreciate the purpose of the task, and as such it will be relevant for them and a memorable way to consolidate their learning. I would also attempt to coincide the activity with World Water Day on March 22 to highlight the international attempts to raise awareness about the necessity for clean water. 

To make this experiment more authentic for the class the teacher could invest time in preparation for it. For example, the story that accompanies the experiment that describes the great journey of the creek could be depicted in a class book, which students contribute to via their character role. These contributions could be a double page spread in a scrap book and could include artistic representations of their role and a fictional story behind their character: are they rule abiders, are they mothers/fathers, are they naughty little kids etc.? This would ensure that during the activity every student not only has a role to play by adding a pollutant, but also has a character to act out. A homework activity prior to the experiment could be to do a little research on their designated role so that their fictional depictions are authentic. A homework activity post experiment could be to have the students reflect on what they learnt, and how they think risks to waterways could be minimised. This activity would require higher order thinking skills as it goes beyond basic comprehension and requires critical and creative thinking skills.

 

Assessment idea:

Informal assessment- The teacher could assess the students’ understanding through their contributions to the class book.

Formal assessments- The teacher could assess the reflections the students wrote after the experiment and gauge whether the experiment conveyed the severity of water pollution.

 

Literacy idea:

Literacy is embedded in this activity; the fictional story written by each student to contribute to the class book, their reflections on the impact of pollutants on waterways for homework, and the narration of the story throughout the experiment. All of these activities provide the teacher with a sound basis to assess literacy skills in the class, and provide the student with the opportunity to practice and improve their literacy skills. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution | Scoop.it

Take a walk in Zoe's shoes

Amy Leahy's insight:

This cartoon comes from World Vision’s school resources that are designed to raise awareness in students about international poverty and inequality. It is an excellent resource as it is an engaging format, is a topic that students are familiar with (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.68), and yet it also challenges students: an environment conducive to learning (Vygotsky, n.d.). The cartoon depicts the story of Zoe, a little girl from Zambia walking down to the river to get water accompanied by a little Australian boy Jake, who mistakes the trip for a swimming adventure rather than a water collection chore. The Australian boy whinges about the distance and when he realises that they have made the journey for water he is shocked by the quality and deems it unsafe for drinking. Whilst he’s right, they don’t have a choice as it’s the only water source. I have chosen this resource to introduce a global perspective into the outcome of 'environmental change'. The world is becoming increasingly globalised and it is important that students are aware of how fortunate they are and how inequitable resource distribution is throughout the world. Unlike Australia, where schools strive to promote educational equity, Zambia, and many other countries in the world do not enjoy this privilege in education and many other facets of their lives (Melbourne Declaration for Educational Goals for Young Children, 2008).

 

Teaching idea:

Reading of the cartoon together as a class on a smart-board. After the reading the teacher could present the students with the United Nations’ Water Quality fact sheet (UN Water Quality Fact Sheet) and the class could come up with similarities and differences between the water situation at home in Australia, and the water situations in Zambia and many other places throughout the world. If possible the teacher could organise pen pals for the students with a school in Africa through Schools Linking Program for Africa. This would allow the students to establish relationships with students of similar ages in another country and makes the learning relevant and important to the students (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, pp.68-69). A follow on activity could be to discuss fundraising activities that the students could organise to help combat water pollution in the town/village that their partner school is in e.g. cake stalls, mufti days, jumble stores, and food fairs. It should be noted that these activities also link to HSIE’s Cultures strand.

 

A homework activity could be to answer the suggested questions from the cartoon and a few others that the teacher creates. E.g.

1. How far do you have to go to get safe drinking water?

2. Count the number of taps in your home. How many do you have?    How many taps is that per person in your household?

3. The UN suggests that each person needs a minimum of 20 litres of safe fresh water a day to ensure their basic needs for drinking, cooking, and cleaning (World Vision, 2012). Using the facts given on page two of the cartoon and the statistics learnt in class, how many people could survive from the amount of water wasted by a dripping tap?

 

Assessment idea:

Class project to work together to inform the rest of their school about the water pollution issues in the village of their partner school e.g. a power point presentation to introduce the African school, posters with facts about the importance of clean waters, a song to demonstrate the huge disparities that exist between students in Australia and students in Africa, a class scrapbook etc.

 

Literacy idea:

Similarities and differences between the water situation in Australia and the water situation in Zambia. Were there any similarities between Zoe’s life and Jake’s life?

 

Numeracy:

As part of the homework activity students are asked to count the number of taps in their household and do a few sums based on their answer. For example, add the total number of taps in the household up and divide by the number of people in the house.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Amy Leahy
Scoop.it!

Plastic Oceans

Plastic Oceans | HSIE Environments- Teaching Environmental Changes- Water Pollution | Scoop.it

BTN Documentary

 

Amy Leahy's insight:

Plastic Oceans is a documentary that provides students with a thorough yet succinct overview of the impact of plastic on our oceans. Students will gain insight into the pervasive nature of plastic in modern society and the adverse effects it has on water quality, marine life and birds, and the world’s shorelines and riverbanks. This is an excellent resource to introduce the concept of water pollution as it is a relevant topic that all students can relate to and introduces new concepts and consequences about the familiar (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p.68), it is an engaging format that provides variety in in teaching methods, and the resource is aimed at stage two and three students so it is accessible to all.

 

Teaching idea:

The teacher could facilitate a short class discussion about the importance of water for human life- just a few general ideas concerning how life is reliant upon healthy waterways to ensure that the gravity of the situation is understood by all. From this activity the teacher can gauge students’ background experiences and understandings of the topic and direct the lesson from there (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2014, p. 68). The class could then watch the documentary mind-mapping ideas and statistics throughout. Post viewing, the teacher can generate another class discussion with questions such as; How many pieces of plastic enter the world’s oceans everyday? What are some of the prevention methods suggested? etc. Students should use their own mind-maps to do this. Students could then work collaboratively discussing how plastic is used and ways to reduce this usage. It is important this is a collaborative task to highlight the shared responsibility society has to combat this problem, linking to HSIE’s Social Systems and Structures strand.  A homework task that could actively involve the students in their learning could be to note the various uses of plastic in their home and how they could implement the three R’s- reduce, reuse, and recycle. They could also bring in unwanted plastic items for an art project aimed at raising awareness of water pollution from plastic.

 

Assessment task idea:

Informal assessment- engage in student discussion and gauge their understanding of the topic. Also, sample work such as homework.

Formal assessment- a project based on how to raise awareness of plastic pollution and the effects on our waterways, and bird and marine life, including ideas for prevention.

 

Literacy strategy:

Throughout the documentary there were a few sophisticated words such as marine, landfill, debris, pollution, and recycle. The class could do a definitions activity to ensure all students have a thorough understanding of the clip.

 

Numeracy strategy:

There were a few statistics throughout the clip e.g. 3.5 million pieces of plastic enter the world’s oceans everyday. Students could be asked to figure out how many pieces that is per week/month/year. Or how much plastic that is per person by discovering the estimated world’s population. 

more...
No comment yet.