HSIE ENES1 Experiences and interactions with immediate environment and areas visited
233 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Antonia Paraschos
Scoop.it!

Positional & Directional Words and FREE Worksheets

Knowledge about directional or positional words enhances a child’s ability to give & follow directions. We provide a list of words & FREE worksheets.
Antonia Paraschos's insight:

Directional and positional words are integral to sharing experiences and interactions with the immediate environment or places visited with peers. Early Stage 1 students should be familiar with basic positional/directional words as stated in Patterns of Place and Location Environments Outcomes and Indicators in the HSIE K-6 Syllabus, "uses everyday vocabulary associated with understanding location, position and place, e.g up, down, over, under, near, far."

 

The activity sheets provided by this link allow teachers to have a bank of words that act as prompts when teaching this aspect of the unit of work. The class can build their own word bank initially and the teacher can gauge understanding of the class' knowledge of the words. The teacher can then guide the class by revealing other common directional words giving examples of how they are used, perhaps using Google Maps to show direction from one place to another or position in relation to other things. The use of these positional and directional words also covers outcomes from the Mathematics K-6 Syllabus - Position SGES1.3, uses everyday language to describe position and give and follow simple directions

 

A possible activity or assessment that can be performed individually at first and then reported in pairs is for the students to pick 2 favourite places within the school grounds, locate them on the map (perhaps using the scribble maps print out that was done in class) draw a path and then write down directions or a few of the directional words and then report back to their partner. The teacher can then collect the maps and see the path the student has drawn and the associated directional/positional words to assess their understanding of the words and their correct use. The teacher will also have to listen to the students give their directions and choose a few students to present to the class - this should increase motivation and hopefully student engagement by listening to their peers. It also provides differentiation of the lesson to provide for the more advanced students.

 

The words can then be put up on to the classroom wall for future reference. Students can decorate the printed words so they feel like they contributed to the display, that it is their own, therefore more likely to refer to it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Antonia Paraschos
Scoop.it!

Scribble Maps - Draw on google maps with scribblings and more!

Scribble Maps - Draw on google maps with scribblings and more! | HSIE ENES1 Experiences and interactions with immediate environment and areas visited | Scoop.it
Draw on google maps with scribbles, squares, circles, and more!
Antonia Paraschos's insight:

This interactive website uses Google Maps and allows users to draw or ‘scribble’, write text, add images, shapes and place markers over the top of a chosen map provided by Google, creating a unique map of their own. The map can then be exported into a variety of formats and used further in the classroom.

 

By using the satellite option of Google Maps to obtain a bird’s eye view, this website can be used as part of a collaborative lesson for the whole class to prepare a map of their school, using the drawing functions. The teacher can use the IWB (Interactive White Board) and bring up the website allowing the students to come up one at a time and trace around and/or label their favourite part of the school, their special place. They can then describe to the class what they like to do in their favourite part of the school. When complete, the map can be printed out and stuck on the wall in the classroom.


Students can then use post it notes to write down one thing that another class member enjoys doing at their favourite place and go and stick it next to that special place on the map. This will assess their listening skills and respect for other student’s opinions. If writing is an issue, a drawing can suffice, however writing is preferred to assess writing skills as well. This also links in with Objective A - Speaking and Listening/Writing and Representing for ES1 English.

 

This can then be extended beyond the school and discussion can be had about other significant places the class has visited. This tool can also be integrated with any excursion briefing or debriefing. The map can also be compared to the school map that is usually available as a 'different type of map' and then explored in person to check for accuracy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Antonia Paraschos
Scoop.it!

Two Valley Trail Educational Resources

Two Valley Trail Educational Resources | HSIE ENES1 Experiences and interactions with immediate environment and areas visited | Scoop.it
Antonia Paraschos's insight:

This website gives information/resources for teachers wanting to take students on a class excursion through areas of bush and parkland near Wolli Creek and Cooks River. Exploration of the local area allows students to become familiar with their immediate surroundings and perhaps recall past experiences with the same area had they visited previously with friends or family. The website provides resources such as work sheets, teacher notes, and maps. Although the resources are aimed at students in Stage 2, they can be easily adapted to suit the Early Stage 1 outcome and subject matter.

 

During the bushwalk, the teacher can ask students to point out and name natural and built features along the way, perhaps matching these to a pre-prepared worksheet with photographs and marking off each feature as they see it during the walk. Along the way, the class can stop and the teacher can guide discussion on what students have seen and verbally recount past experiences visiting this area. Children can listen to each other’s experiences and compare them to their own. Another activity during the walk is to ask the children to notice things they can see, touch, feel, hear (maybe not taste!).

 

A possible assessment to gauge understanding of the senses (their interactions with the environment) is to ask the students to draw something that they saw, felt, heard, smelled (possibly tasted) during the excursion and perhaps lead a discussion/debrief for students to reflect on what they have seen and where else they may have seen/heard/smelt/felt the same thing. Would you find it at school? Would you find it at another park? Etc.

 

Going on an excursion in a place where the children may have been before allows the children to link a past experience with a present one. What they had seen in the past may not have made sense, but now presented with new information about the area, they can link past knowledge/experience with present instruction, experiential learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Antonia Paraschos
Scoop.it!

My Little Bookcase | Blog | Book Spotlight: Why I Love Australia by Bronwyn Bancroft : A love of reading starts with one special story

My Little Bookcase | Blog | Book Spotlight: Why I Love Australia by Bronwyn Bancroft : A love of reading starts with one special story | HSIE ENES1 Experiences and interactions with immediate environment and areas visited | Scoop.it
Antonia Paraschos's insight:

Written and illustrated by Bronwyn Bancroft, a leading artist and children’s book illustrator. Bancroft was born in Tenterfield, NSW and her father was Bundjalung, Djanbun clan. The book contains exquisite paintings of landscapes of Australia with short sentences describing their beauty. Bancroft’s aim of the book was to showcase the varied landscapes and to inspire readers to develop their own love for Australia and all it has to offer. Each painting contains a picture of a person holding a ‘coolamon’ with smoke coming from it. The back of the book explains the significance of this picture, stating that it is a way that the Aboriginal people show respect for another’s language group or area and pay tribute to the Ancestors through the smoking ceremony. The image on each page is paying respect to each landscape and ‘wishing you well as you visit his country and make your acknowledgements to the Ancestors and Elders past and present of each place’ (Bancroft, 2011, p. 32).

 

Teachers can read this book to the class allowing the students enough time to enjoy the colourful paintings. Before reading the book, the teacher should read out the acknowledgement written by Bancroft and give an explanation as to why such a statement is read before starting the book or anywhere else they may hear such a statement. At the end of the book, the teacher should see if the students noticed the man holding the coolamon on every page and tell the students of the significance of his appearance with the paintings.

 

This text is suitable as it adheres to the selection criteria as outlined in the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal Studies and Torres Strait Islander Studies (2012). Age range is 3-12 years old and can be utilized in many ways as a classroom resource. A possible activity post-reading could be to choose a landscape in the book that they have seen before or have visited before and what it was like, why you liked it, what you did there and describe to the class. The students could also use the library to find photographs of each scene that matches the paintings, for example, they can find a photograph of the coral reefs, a birds eye view of suburbia and match them to the paintings. Another possible activity could be to research other traditional Aboriginal ceremonies and talk about them to the class in groups. This could coincide with a visit from an Aboriginal group that would perhaps perform to the whole school. Discussion can be had around respecting other people’s land and language and asking the children about their thoughts around this and why we must respect others.

 

Use of this book can also address Creative Arts outcomes for example asking a student to pick a favourite scene from the book and paint their own representation of that scene, not using the same methods as Bancroft, but using their own methods and then explaining their painting and appreciating and discussing the methods used in the book.

 

References:

Aboriginal, Multicultural, Languages and Learning Resource Centre. (2012).

The selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal studies and Torres Strait Islander studies. West Croydon: Author.

 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Antonia Paraschos
Scoop.it!

Resources gallery | Global Education

Resources gallery | Global Education | HSIE ENES1 Experiences and interactions with immediate environment and areas visited | Scoop.it
Antonia Paraschos's insight:

This website provides fantastic photography of environments both natural and built of places and people interacting with them around the world. It also links to teaching activities that can be used in the classroom to showcase the difference between the student’s immediate environment and those of other cultures around the world.

 

Teachers can use the photography comparing different uses of the student’s immediate environment and that of others around the globe.

Students can bring in photographs of themselves doing things in familiar places such as playing soccer on a soccer field, eating at a table, parents preparing dinner etc and a chart can be made with photographs from this site and ask the students to add their photos underneath those where they are doing similar things (e.g. Children playing Rugby in South Africa vs. Rugby/sport played locally). This will raise awareness and allow discussion about the differences and similarities there are in different environments depending on their location.  (Alternatively, the teacher can provide such photographs of people interacting with the local environment if students cannot supply.)

 

Students can then draw themselves doing something they love at their favourite place and present to the class (or a small group of students) what they are doing, where it is and why they love it. This can form an assessment to understand the student’s knowledge of their personal environment. Teacher can also ask questions about how their favourite place is different to those they have seen in the photographs.

more...
No comment yet.