HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met
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HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met
A selection of resources for teaching specific Social Systems and Structures content in Early Stage One classrooms
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Teaching activities | Global Education

Teaching activities | Global Education | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met | Scoop.it

Teaching Sequences Galore! Use the filter option on the left hand sidebar to limit search results to specific year levels.   

Margaret Gordon's insight:

Global Education is an initiative of the Australian government, which provides teaching resources in an effort to embed Global Perspectives across the curriculum. Using the left side bar, activities can be filtered to show only those aimed at F-2 (equivalent to NSW Kindergarten to Year Two). The activities all align with the NSW HSIE syllabus and many are useful for teaching personal and class needs and how they are met. The first link to ‘Basic needs and children’s rights’ showcases some excellent teaching ideas which may encourage students to think about their own needs in relation to those of their global peers; 'Activity 2 What children need to survive and develop,' would be of particular relevance for a class investigating childrens' needs and how they are met.

 

Limitations:

The resources made available on the Global Education website, although brilliant, are not appropriate for direct use in an Early Stage One classroom. A great HSIE teacher would use the provided lesson activities as merely a basic stimulus for their own lessons, perhaps appropriating some of the individual activities into their own teaching sequence. Links are provided to materials such as videos or photo galleries and even templates which could be used as scaffolds for student work. As noted by Marsh (2008), once key concepts have been identified “to develop quality units, a lot of thought must go into the selection of content” (p. 31). In other words, although these Global Education teaching resources may cover similar issues, and it may be tempting to run through the lesson activities as they are presented, a great HSIE teacher would consider the very specific context of their own classroom and make appropriate adjustments to ensure the success of all students using this content in their classroom.

 

Marsh, C. (2008). Chapter 2 - Planning for Learning. In Studies of society and environment: exploring the teaching possibilities (5th edition). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. 

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Who are we?

Who are we? | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met | Scoop.it

This site is great for teachers looking to incorporate Indigenous Perspectives in any classroom. Use the information on this site to inform practice and enhance appreciation of Indigenous Australian culture for all. 

Margaret Gordon's insight:

A brilliant site for teachers looking to incorporate Indigenous Perspectives in their classroom. Developed by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) the website is a new accompaniment to the Little Red Yellow and Black Book which has been an indispensible addition to many classrooms since its production in 1994. The AIATSIS strives to provide quality information curated with high levels of Indigenous participation and direct input, which informs all Australians, and indeed people all over the world, of "the richness and diversity of Australian Indigenous cultures and histories" (AIATSIS, 2013). The authenticity and reliability of the information on this website is extremely high. 

 
The site itself is not appropriate for direct use in Early Stage One, but the information should inform practice; by using this information as the basis of a critical appraisal of other potential resources, teachers can feel confident they are choosing authentic, respectful, relevant and appropriate sources as they incorporate Indigenous Perspectives in their classroom activities. 


Teaching Idea:
In terms of class needs and how they are met, students will need to consider the differences in community and family structure between themselves and their peers, including Indigenous Australians. This website gives a brief overview of the intricate web of Indigenous Kinship which a great HSIE teacher would use to inform their teaching of the roles and responsibilities of students, peers and family members in Indigenous communities.
The teacher could present two (fictional) family trees, one depicting the typical Nuclear family and another which shows the complex network of Indigenous family ties. Each family member (on both trees) should have designated roles within the family unit which may be illustrated with simple pictures. For example, in the Nuclear family the mother may be responsible for all cooking whereas the Indigenous family could show that several women are responsible for preparing food for a larger group. This activity aligns with Hambel's (2006) assertion that teachers need to help deconstruct the socio-cultural concept of 'whiteness' which has become the embedded norm in much of Australian (Western) society (cited in Marsh, 2010, p. 270).  


Limitations:
As always, when incorporating Indigenous Perspectives in the classroom it is crucial to emphasise that the information provided is not infallible. This website has been produced by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS) and must therefore be respected. Ideally however, a Primary Source such as a local Aboriginal Elder or perhaps the school Aboriginal and Islander Education Officer would be invited into the classroom to explain Indigenous Kinship and enhance students’ understanding of how basic needs are met in Indigenous Communities. 

 

Assessment: 
Roles and responsibilities within family units should be a salient feature of whole-class discussion, with an emphasis on who does what at home. After the discussion students fill in a table about who does what at their own home e.g. cooking, caring for pets, putting toys away. The table could be filled with written words or pictures depending on student needs. The students could then be asked to imagine how roles and responsibilities at home might be different if they were part of an Indigenous family and complete the same table from this point of view. 

 

AIATSIS, 2013, About the book, retrieved 22nd May, 2013 from http://www.aiatsis.gov.au/lryb/about-the-book.html

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher; knowledge, skills and issues (5th edition). Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Australia.
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Skwirk - Wants & Needs

Click on 'Workers in the Community' or 'the Need for Shelter' for a fantastic selection of interactive resources for teaching about personal and class needs and how they are met. 

Margaret Gordon's insight:

This site provides a wonderful platform for the whole of the lower Primary HSIE Syllabus with a range of virtual resources for all topics. For the Early Stage One Social Systems and Structures subject matter, and in particular for teaching personal and class needs and how they are met, the ‘Workers in the Community’ and ‘The Need for Shelter’ options are of great relevance. Clicking on the ‘Workers in the Community’ image opens a page of sub-topics related to the subject matter which each feature a short movie clip, a script of the text and a simple game.

­Teaching Idea:
This site has great potential for direct use in the Kindergarten classroom both individually on a personal computing device, or collaboratively on an Interactive Whiteboard. As suggested by Wilkie and Jones (2008), when Interactive Whiteboards are utilised in the classroom "students can benefit through increased opportunities for active participation in lessons and easier collaboration with peers" (p. 9). All activities on the Skwirk site are age-appropriate for a Kindergarten class and lend well to introducing content for further exploration. For example, to introduce the idea of personal and class needs and how they are met, the teacher might use the first sub-topic of the ‘Workers in the Community’ page, ‘Want and needs.’ The class could watch the short video clip (which gives a brief explanation of the difference between needs and wants) then, in a Guided Reading activity re-visit the script in order to consolidate understanding of the video content. Following a short discussion of items children need personally, the teacher may coordinate a short run through of the game, selecting students to come to the front and touch items they believe are needs as opposed to wants. In terms of developing numeracy, students could count the number of items children need and compare this to the number of items children want. 


Limitations:
A great HSIE teacher will recognise however that the information on the Skwirk site is inadequate on its own; as discussed earlier, the Skwirk resource would be appropriate only for introducing the key concepts associated with personal and class needs and how they are met, and therefore only one of the four approaches to the curriculum as outlined by Gilbert and Hoepper (2011), “SOSE [or HSIE] as information.”

 

Assessment:
Students create a shopping list of at least three things they need every day. More advanced students might annotate their drawings, naming each item on their list. In order to scaffold the task for students who require assitance a bank of possible items for the shopping list could be provided from which students select three items.
 

Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.  

Wilkie, K. J., and Jones, A. J., (2008). Link and learn: students connecting to their schools and studies using ICT despite chronic illness. In AARE 2008 International education research conference: Brisbane: papers collection [Conference of the Australian Association for Research in Education, 30 November - 4 December 2008] compiled by P L Jeffrey. Melbourne: Australian Association for Research in Education, 2008. Retrieved 23rd April 2013 from http://publications.aare.edu.au/08pap/wil08169.pdf
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Food and Farming - Food a fact of life

Food and Farming - Food a fact of life | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met | Scoop.it

Feeling hungry? Use this website to delve deeper into one of the fundamental needs of all living things...food! 

Margaret Gordon's insight:

This is a great site for an in-depth exploration of food, a fundamental need of all living things, as well as investigating where some basic food products come from. A range of age appropriate activities are provided which could be presented on an Interactive Whiteboard, as well as fact sheets and some very basic lesson plans for teachers with links to relevant videos and printable classroom resources. The site has been produced by the British Nutrition Foundation so can be considered with a fair degree of esteem, and although it is not local the content remains relevant to Australian classrooms.
 

The breadth of the resources on this site allow for meaningful engagement with the HSIE curriculum and in particular, the Social Structures and Systems stand. The following list outlines some basic lesson ideas using the British Nutrition Foundation website, applying each of the curriculum approaches outlined by Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p. 18):

HSIE as information: Teacher presents the ‘Where does food come from?’ PowerPoint on an Interactive Whiteboard or computer screen. Students learn that all food products come from plants or animals.

HSIE as disciplined knowledge: Students play the ‘Where does my food come from?’ game, working collaboratively to select from the provided options the source of the food items presented. In doing so, students begin to think critically about how their needs are met and by whom.

HSIE as personal and social development: Students complete the ‘What is for breakfast?’ worksheet, available as a printable resource on bottom of the 'Key Fact 1: All food comes from plants or animals' page. To complete the worksheet students must consider their personal food choices and where the food they eat comes from. In order to integrate other Key Learning Areas such as mathematics, the results of such a class investigation could be collected and graphed visually in order to determine which food source (e.g. wheat, cows, chickens) is most important to the class at breakfast time.

HSIE as participation in society: Collaboratively, students choose one of the recipes on the website to cook. The creation of a shopping list may be used as a writing activity with opportunity for Modelled or Independent Writing depending on individual needs. Reading will also be integral to the activity in order to decipher the chosen recipe; the teacher may choose to implement Guided, Modelled and/or Independent Reading tasks depending on the abilities of students in the class. During cooking the source of each ingredient should be discussed in order to consolidate understanding from an HSIE viewpoint e.g. What are the steps involved in making this yoghurt?

HSIE as critical social understanding and action: As suggested on the ‘Key Fact 2’ page, the class could create their own school food garden in order to experience the process of food production first-hand. In doing so students will come to better appreciate the complex origins of some foods and begin to understand that meeting basic needs may not be as simple as they may have imagined.

 

Assessment: 
Students complete the 'Farm to fork challenge' (link to be found on the left side of the page) which requires identification of the correct stages in the production of some basic food products. If computers are not available for all students, the teacher could print the 'Farm to fork cards,' (see Key Fact 3 page) cut out each picture and shuffle them for students to complete the same task manually. 

 

Gilbert, R. and Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Toy Stories | gabriele galimberti

Toy Stories | gabriele galimberti | HSIE ES1 Social Systems and Structures; personal and class needs and how they are met | Scoop.it

Offering a glimpse into the lives of children everywhere, this photo gallery focuses on one important need of children all over the world - PLAY! 

Margaret Gordon's insight:

Gabriele Galimbert, an Italian artist, spent 18 months travelling around the world photographing children with their favourite toys. By incorporating the resulting images into the HSIE classroom students will begin to identify links between themselves and their global peers – they might recognise similarities between their own favourite toys and those of children in Mexico, Malawi or Malaysia.  Further, students will be forced to think critically about their own toys and other possessions and perhaps begin to consider the difference between needs and wants.

After exploring Galimbert’s images it would be great to introduce similar projects which document other basic needs and how they are met around the world. Comparing and contrasting these images with their own experiences provides “a context for students to personally explore their own values, self and social relationships” (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 15) which aligns with the idea of using HSIE as a platform for personal and social development.
For example,  
- Peter Menzel and Faith d’Aluisio have created a book of portraits depicting individuals and their daily food consumption. http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,2037749_2219859,00.html
- Peter Menzel’s book, ‘Hungry Planet’ documents the weekly food consumption of families. http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1626519_1373664,00.html
- The Japanese Haga Library presents information about diverse forms of shelter. http://www.hgpho.to/wfest/house/house-e.html

- World Vision Australia offers information about the lives of individual children in Africa and Asia. Such personal accounts could be extremely effective in Kindergarten classrooms as students will find it easier to understand and relate to their global peers if they consider individual children rather than indiscrete groups. http://www.worldvision.com.au/Learn/SchoolResources/Content.aspx?id=9a497de4-0dc2-441c-ab6a-988b80091d19


Links to other Key Learning Areas:
Resources such as this image gallery have great potential for drawing cross-curricular links which is critical in Primary classrooms.

Mathematics and numeracy; students could create pictographs to investigate relationships between children’s favourite play things around the world. Classification is an important component of pre-number learning which often emerges through informal play situations (Macmillan, 2002, cited in Bobis, Mulligan and Lowrie, 2009, p. 184) and this is therefore the perfect opportunity for children to practice identifying similarities between objects and the subsequent processes of sorting and classifying.

English and literacy; simply by viewing the images and drawing meaning from them students are engaged in a visual literacy activity. However this could be extended by asking students to draw a picture of themselves and their favourite toys in the style of Galimbert's portraits. This activity will force students to select and focus on only their most treasured posessions, and become a great precursor to a discussion of the difference between needs and wants. In order to further extend the literacy component of the task, through Guided Writing a caption could be created for each image (e.g. Maudy from Zambia loves her big collection of colourful sunglasses). Students may then compose a similar caption for their own drawings either with scaffolding or independently.
 

Assessment: 

Students identify one similarity and one difference between their own life and those of children overseas in terms of how their basic needs are met. For example, a student could write/draw/speak about how they like playing with trucks just like the boy in Mexico. They may then acknowledge that their own home looks very different to the treehouse in the Philippines. 

 

Bobis, J, Mulligan, J and Lowrie, T. (2009). Mathematics for Children: challenging children to think mathematically. Frenchs Forest, NSW: Pearson Education Australia. 

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