HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity
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HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity
HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity
Outcome - CCES1 Subject Matter - Students in ES1 will learn about events and stages in their lifetime
Curated by Eleni Boulas
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Growing And Changing Concept Book - K-3 Teacher Resources

Growing And Changing Concept Book - K-3 Teacher Resources | HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Growing and Changing Printable Concept Book - Children finish the sentence - When I was born I could..., When I was 3 years old I could..., etc.
Eleni Boulas's insight:

This downloadable workbook could be used in conjunction with the picture book 'When I Was Little: A Four Year Old's Memoir' by Jamie Lee Curtis. I would introduce the topic of change and continuity: stages and events in their lifetime, to children in Early Stage 1, by reading the picture book, then asking the children to discuss ways in which the main character has changed since she was a baby. Some examples of change in 'When I Was Little: A Four Year Old’s Memoir' are teeth growing, outgrowing a baby car seat, moving to a big bed, eating different food and going to preschool. This story also provides examples of continuity, as the book describes some things that have not changed, such as still wanting her grandmother to wait at the bottom of the slide and her parents to read her a story every night before bed.

 

I would then facilitate a discussion about students’ experiences and encourage them to describe changes and important stages or events in their own lives. The students could record their responses in the downloadable 'We Grow And Change' workbook.This workbook asks students to record important events or changes at different ages, and also asks students to consider what changes may occur in the future when they are teenagers and adults.

 

As the students are in Early Stage 1, and may not be able to express their ideas in sentences yet, the unlined pages and format of this workbook, allows for students to draw or write, depending on their ability. Although the emphasis of this lesson would be HSIE, it would also involve literacy and creative arts.

 

An alternate use for the workbook would be to ask the students to bring in photographs of themselves at different ages in their lives and paste them in the workbook under the appropriate headings.

 

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A School Like Mine eBook

A School Like Mine eBook | HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity | Scoop.it

In this unique celebration of the commonalties and differences between school days in different countries, children discuss their lives, views, and hopes for the future. Full color

Eleni Boulas's insight:

Going to school is a major event in the life of a child in Early Stage 1, and could be used as a topic to explore with students with the aim of meeting the outcome and indicator CCES1, change and continuity, events and stages in their own life and the lives of others. This ebook, 'A School Like Mine', offers a global perspective on this subject. There are photographs and short descriptions of lessons, lunchtime, sport and games of children in different countries around the world, including Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, Ethiopia, Botswana, Ireland, France, Italy, Germany Turkey, India, China and Japan, to name a few.

 

An Early Stage 1 class could brainstorm ideas about what it is like at  their school and in their classroom, and then discuss what is it like for children in other countries to go to school. This ebook could be used to facilitate this discussion by viewing photographs from the ebook on an iPad or interactive whiteboard. I would then ask the students to identify similarities and differences when compared with their own experiences of school.

 

The publishers of this book, Dorling Kindersley, also have a web page (http://www.kiddk.com/static/html/parentteacher/images/SchoolLikeMineTG.pdf) with suggested activities for teachers to use in their classrooms in conjunction with 'A School Like Mine'. One activity recommended is sending letters to penpals in other countries. The teacher resource guide suggests asking questions such as : “ What do you wear to school? How big is your class? How do you get to school? What does your school look like? What classes do you have?“. As children in Early Stage 1 may be unable to write these sentences and letters themselves, an idea would be for the class to discuss and compose a letter together as a group and for the teacher to send it to a penpal class on behalf all the students in the class.

An alternative activity to sending a real penpal letter may also be to ask children to role play and imagine they are the children in different countries, thereby linking creative arts/ drama to this HSIE outcome and indicator. The teacher could ask the questions that might be in a letter to a penpal and the students could identify the answers by looking at pictures in the ebook.

 

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Omar PC's curator insight, March 12, 6:06 PM

Going to school is a major event in the life of a child in Early Stage 1, and could be used as a topic to explore with students with the aim of meeting the outcome and indicator CCES1, change and continuity, events and stages in their own life and the lives of others. This ebook, 'A School Like Mine', offers a global perspective on this subject. There are photographs and short descriptions of lessons, lunchtime, sport and games of children in different countries around the world, including Brazil, Mexico, South Africa, Ethiopia, Botswana, Ireland, France, Italy, Germany Turkey, India, China and Japan, to name a few.

 

An Early Stage 1 class could brainstorm ideas about what it is like at  their school and in their classroom, and then discuss what is it like for children in other countries to go to school. This ebook could be used to facilitate this discussion by viewing photographs from the ebook on an iPad or interactive whiteboard. I would then ask the students to identify similarities and differences when compared with their own experiences of school.

 

The publishers of this book, Dorling Kindersley, also have a web page (http://www.kiddk.com/static/html/parentteacher/images/SchoolLikeMineTG.pdf) with suggested activities for teachers to use in their classrooms in conjunction with 'A School Like Mine'. One activity recommended is sending letters to penpals in other countries. The teacher resource guide suggests asking questions such as : “ What do you wear to school? How big is your class? How do you get to school? What does your school look like? What classes do you have?“. As children in Early Stage 1 may be unable to write these sentences and letters themselves, an idea would be for the class to discuss and compose a letter together as a group and for the teacher to send it to a penpal class on behalf all the students in the class.

An alternative activity to sending a real penpal letter may also be to ask children to role play and imagine they are the children in different countries, thereby linking creative arts/ drama to this HSIE outcome and indicator. The teacher could ask the questions that might be in a letter to a penpal and the students could identify the answers by looking at pictures in the ebook.

 

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How We Grow and Change

How We Grow and Change | HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Lessons & Instructional Materials - How We Grow and Change. An interactive flipchart to develop learning for kindergarten children about how they have grown and changed since being a baby.
Eleni Boulas's insight:

This digital resource consists of a series of slides and activities that can be used on an interactive whiteboard to enhance children’s understanding of this outcome and indicator. There are slides of children at the stages of babies, infants, toddlers and school children surrounded by objects that represent that particular stage of life. The slide depicting babies has a picture of a baby and objects commonly associated with babies, such as a stroller, cot and car safety capsule, whereas the slide depicting school children has pictures of letters of the alphabet, a school, children in a class and an abacus.

 

Another of the slides is an interactive activity utilising photographs of children at the different developmental stages of lying down, sitting, crawling, standing and running, arranged in random order. The students can move the pictures around the interactive whiteboard to put the developmental stages in the correct sequence.

There are also slides of matching activities that require the students to rearrange pictures of children into the correct chronological order, as well as matching certain objects or activities with different stages of growth.

These interactive whiteboard activities involving matching and sequencing could be used towards the end of teaching this outcome to Early Stage 1, to assess the students understanding of change and continuity, with respect to stages and events in their lifetimes.

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Rebecca Louise Melia's curator insight, April 11, 2015 12:28 AM

This slideshow could be used as an introduction to this topic as it shows images representing the growth from birth to school-age. Using the IWB, the slides include opportunities for students to brainstorm their ideas about what it means to be school aged, and also has the class sequence the images, identifying the order of the stages. The interactive quality of this resource makes it valuable as research suggests that students are often more engaged with learning when participating in such activities - meaning they are energised, strategic and motivated (Marsh, 2010, p.134). 

 

To make a literacy link, students could create text for each of the slides. Each student writes a subtitle for a slide that only has a heading. This activity allows students to practice composing simple texts to convey an idea (ENe-2A). To help scaffold the activity, the teacher could have the class construct a sentence for the "babies" slide, for example "At birth a person is a baby". Then, individually, students can create subtitles for the slides entitled infants, toddlers, pre-schoolers, school child. The subtitles should introduce or provide information about the life stage. 

 

References: 

Board of Studies. (2014). English K-10. Retrieved April 10, 2015 from http://syllabus.bos.nsw.edu.au/english/english-k10/ 

Grant, J. (2011). Lessons and instructional materials: how we grow and change. Retrieved April 11, 2015 from http://www.prometheanplanet.com/en/Resources/Item/80059/how-we-grow-and-change#.VSihy1wUtE5

Marsh, C. (2010) Becoming a teacher: knowledge, skills and issues. (5th Ed.) Frenchs Forest: Pearson

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Timeline of child's life

Timeline of child's life | HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Lessons & Instructional Materials - Time of my Life. Timeline for display and demonstration to teach students how to make a timeline..
Eleni Boulas's insight:

This resource is an example of a timeline that can be shown to the class on an interactive whiteboard to demonstrate the various stages that children have gone through in their lives.


To introduce this activity, I would first read stories about children at different stages. Examples of some picture books that I would read to the class to discuss when the children were babies are 'The Baby Book' and 'Peepo!', both by Janet and Allen Ahlberg. Examples of picture books about children at preschool are 'Tom Tom' by Rosemay Sullivan and 'When I Was Little: Memoirs of a Four Year Old' by Jamie Lee Curtis. 'Billy and The Big New School' by Catherine and Laurence Anholt is a book about children in Kindergarten.


Over a series of lessons, these books could be read aloud, to prompt discussion about these different stages in children’s lives. As a group, the students could identify major events and changes that occur as they grow older.


The timeline could be used as a visual representation of the the changes identified by the students during the class discussion. As an assessment of the children’s understanding of this outcome, the students could then construct a timeline of their own lives. As students in Early Stage 1 may not be able to complete this activity by writing sentences, the timeline might consist of drawings of themselves at different stages and then labelled with the aid of the teacher.

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A Teacher Resource Website dedicated to Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan

A Teacher Resource Website dedicated to Tom Tom by Rosemary Sullivan | HSIE Early Stage One - Change & Continuity | Scoop.it

The following teaching resources have been developed to support the use of Tom Tom in educational settings

Eleni Boulas's insight:

This digitial resource is a website dedicated to the picture book 'Tom Tom', by Rosemary Sullivan. The webpage for this book provides useful information to assist teachers in the classroom with regards to structuring lessons around the book. The picture book is about a preschool aged boy living in the Northern Territory in a remote Indigenous community. The study of this book in Early Stage 1 would contribute to students’ understanding of the outcome and indicator CCES1, Change and Continuity, events and stages in their own lives and in the lives of others, whilst also introducing an Indigenous perspective.

 

The web site describes the educational value of this book: “Tom Tom  provides a rich source of literature-based learning for children. For non-Indigenous students, it provides the opportunity to see the great commonalities that exist between Indigenous children and themselves, and also develop an understanding of the differences which exist in the ways people live. For Indigenous children, it provides the opportunity to see their own life brought to the page; a chance to see themselves in literature” (Sullivan, 2010).

 

Going to preschool is an important event/stage that most children can relate to, and the author describes a young boy going to preschool in an Aboriginal community. Tom Tom’s activities at preschool are described, such as playing with dough, pretending to cook, and pretending to make fire. In one of the illustrations he is represented painting a bird. Tom Tom is also described to be playing in a cubby house that is made out of sticks and paperbark.

 

The illustrations show that Tom Tom attends preschool outside, and that a bus picks him up and takes him there and back every day. Tom Tom’s after-school activities are also described, which include swimming, climbing trees and playing with other children in the community.

 

The reading of this book to an Early Stage 1 class could promote group discussion regarding change and continuity relating to stages and events in their life and in the lives of others. Students could discuss their experiences of going to preschool and the kinds of activities they did there, and compare and contrast these experiences with the descriptions of Tom Tom’s experiences in the book. The children may identify similarities between themselves and Tom Tom in terms of pretend play, painting, and playing cubby houses, but may also appreciate differences such as the materials used to construct the cubby house and to do art.

 

The story also raises the concept of growth and change in the description of Tom Tom swimming in the river at the end of the book. “Tom Tom dives down deep.....One day, when he’s bigger, he will touch the bottom... but now he swims back to the top and splashes” highlights how his physical ability will change as he grows older and bigger Sullivan (2012).

 

This web site, and associated picture book, would also be useful when addressing the indicator 'listens and talks about stories of other families and their heritage, including countries of origin and Aboriginality', associated with the outcome CCES1 to children in Early Stage 1. Tom Tom is represented as belonging to a large extended family of grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins, who are all involved in his upbringing, and this could be discussed in comparison with the notion of a nuclear family as a family unit in other cultures.

 

This web site also provides links to literacy activities aimed at Early Stage 1 and ESL (English as a Second Language) students. The activities include labelling pictures from the story, cloze passage, sentence scrambles, memory match games that would incorporate literacy into the HSIE lesson.

 

Reference:

 

Sullivan, R. ( 2010) Welcome: Lemonade Springs. Retrieved April 10, 2013, from http://lemonadesprings.com.au

 

Sullivan, R. (2012) Tom Tom. Adelaide: Working Tiltle Press.

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