Natural and Built Environments
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Natural and Built Environments
Natural and Built Environments
EDUP3002 Human Society and its Environment 2

ENES1 - Gathers information about natural and built environments and communicates some of the ways in which they interact with, and can care for, these environments.

Subject Matter: Natural and built features of their immediate environment and of areas they have visited.
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Built and Natural Environments

A clip to help students understand the difference between built and natural environments. ES1 loved it!
jkee1851's insight:

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.


During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).


To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)

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Luke Hayward's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:44 PM

This resource is a great way to introduce students to the idea of natural and built features and provide a reference point for students to start identifying the natural and built features in their own immediate environments. The video contains some images of landmarks from around Sydney that students will recognise as well as images from around the world of all different types of natural and built and features.

 

During the video, the teacher can stop on chosen images and get students to discuss and suggest reasons why that feature can be classified as either built or natural environment.  The main teaching idea is to get student to identify what elements they are using to determine whether it is a natural or built feature. Then in pairs give students a number of images which together they will need to sort into built and natural by discussing the features they see in each image. The task can also be used as a goal indicator for students, stating that by the end of this topic you will be able to identify different natural and built features of the environment around you (Principle of Assessment For Learning).

 

To assess student understanding get students to complete the sentence “A natural environment I know is… “ and “A built environment I know is…” as well as drawing an image to represent these two chosen environment from their experiences. This aligns with the Literacy Continuum where Early Stage 1 students are expected to at cluster 3 or middle of the year, write a recognisable sentence.  For extra scaffolding the sentence can be completed on the board with the students that need the support and they can then go and copy this sentence. For students who need extension have them complete another sentence describing the natural and built environment. (Linking to cluster 4 on the Literacy Continuum.)

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Browse Inside Houses and Homes by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman

Browse Inside Houses and Homes by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman | Natural and Built Environments | Scoop.it
Browse Inside Houses and Homes, by Ann Morris, Illustrated by Ken Heyman, a Paperback from HarperCollins, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers
jkee1851's insight:

This book leads students through an exploration of different houses around the world which will link the built and natural environment topic to a global perspective. Here students can compare the images of different houses around the world to their own home.


A teaching idea involves looking at an enlarged image of each page and the class can narrate to the teacher differences in general to homes they find in their neighbourhood. Points may also come up of where students may have seen houses like these or features like these e.g. in picture books, on holidays. Discussion of why these features are important might occur with the more advanced students – especially with some of the images of houses that are on stilts above water.


A numeracy link could involve identifying different types of shapes in the different images of houses around the world (Mathematics Syllabus SGES1.2) – printouts of the pictures from the book or from a website such as http://www.hgpho.to/wfest/house/house-e.html could be drawn on with marker to show the different shapes or placed up on an IWB where the student can trace different shapes found. Then the shapes can be counted in each picture and a total of all the different types of shapes found and how many of each could be established.


For assessment students could write a sentence or two about how their home is similar and different to a house pictured. A starting prompt could include “My house is similar to the one in the picture because …” or “My house is different to the one in the picture because …”. These can then be stuck up under the relevant picture. Remembering that some students still learning to write may need to narrate to the teacher who can write under their writing legibly. This links in with the emphases of global education which indicates that in the early years students should see how they are connected to other people and places. Looking at different houses around the world and identifying what is similar and different enables students to connect on a global level with places around the world (Global Perspectives, A framework for global education in Australian Schools - http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/GPS_web.pdf, 2011).

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Our Place - COGS - Early Stage 1

jkee1851's insight:

From this complete unit on Curriculum Support an excellent activity can be attained. On page 6 the activity relating to “My place, my home” can be used. This activity gets student to relate the idea of environments to what they know in their life. “Using Google Earth students pretend they are space travellers to visit their local neighbourhood”, this is scaffolded by the school address being already inserted so students just have to click and watch the journey.


Students then use the street view option and discuss with their partner the features of the environment they observe. If a lesson has already been done about built and natural environments, this can continue to consolidate where students find the natural and built environments in their neighbourhood. Using different technology in classroom is important as students generally will already have an introduction into computers and digital information (Cooper, 2005), this enables teachers to extend the students’ knowledge through activities such as this one without the added need to completely introduce them to the technology.


Linking this to the Mathematics Syllabus and SGES1.3 where students “give and follow simple directions”. An activity can be used where students go from their house to one natural environment (identify that a natural environment is generally green on the map). The teacher suggests a route by Google and students use positional language to describe the route.


For an assessment student can print out the map surrounding the school (or their homes) and identify and circle all the natural features on their map. They then use this to stimulate a discussion about natural environments surrounding this built feature. Alternatively students could street view their house and surrounding houses and draw a picture of this from the street view. They then could label built and natural features e.g. grass, trees, house, fence on their image. Then use this as the stimulus for a discussion surrounding built and natural features in their immediate environment at home. This discussion is important as dating as far back as Wilkinson (1965) who really introduced the concept of oracy, showing the links between talk and the development of skills in reading and writing.

 

Cooper, L. (2005). Developmentally appropriate digital environments for young children. Library Trends, 54(2), 286-302.

Wilkinson, A. (1965). Spoken English, Birmingham, University of Birmingham Press.

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A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction

A shared history - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 Introduction | Natural and Built Environments | Scoop.it
jkee1851's insight:

This resource details teaching ideas related to a Stage 1 unit on a matching outcome. The ideas and resources can be adapted for an Early Stage 1 class. In particular a teaching activity that is relevant is “working with the local Aboriginal community, add where possible, Aboriginal names of these features. Where possible, label bilingually.” This means getting a local Aboriginal person in to talk to the class about the local area and to help identify features in the environment that can be labelled in a local Aboriginal language. In regards to the Selection Criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Resources, as this is a teaching idea it cannot be evaluated completely by the criteria. However, elements are included such as direct Aboriginal participation by getting a local Aboriginal person to come and present to the students. Another element is authenticity and accuracy which will be assessed when the local person is contacted, this can include asking an elder or local community to recommend a person or going through a particular service dedicated to this type of request. This is important as it will not only increase the attendance and outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in the class, it will also give non-Indigenous students a greater understanding of cultural differences, mutual respect and richer knowledge of Australia’s history (www.reconciliation.org.au, 2005-2013).


The Aboriginal speaker can come and identify places in the local area in terms of Aboriginal significance, this links built and natural environments to a historical and Indigenous perspective. These can then be marked on a class map of the local area. This links in with the English Syllabus in terms of talking and listening outcomes TS2.1 where students listen to descriptions and sustained information reports about familiar and unfamiliar topics.


An assessment idea is for students to participate in a discussion about what they heard from the Aboriginal speaker using the class created map as a reference. This could be done as a whole class or a small group with the teacher scaffolding the discussion. Observational records for each student can be kept about their comments and participation in the discussion.  Also linking into the English Syllabus TS2.1 where students participate in class discussions on a variety of topics.

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The Department of Education - A-E Exemplars - Exemplars by Learning Area

The Department of Education - A-E Exemplars - Exemplars by Learning Area | Natural and Built Environments | Scoop.it
jkee1851's insight:

This website is run by Department of Education in Western Australia. It has a natural and built environments assessment for a Year 1 class. When looking at it seems to be an achievable assessment for Kindergarten in New South Wales specifically when related to the subject matter chosen. However it extends into criteria not to do with the chosen subject matter.


The section of the assessment that is relevant is the first page of each assessment which asks students to draw and label 2 natural and 2 built features in the environment. To continue on with NSW literacy outcomes (NSW English Syllbaus WES1.9), a section to write a sentence describing each picture could be added. The usefulness of this resource extends as it provides an indicator for A, B and C examples. It also shows a good way of notating the assessment according to different indicators as shown by the colour coding of each example.


Rather than this being Assessment For Learning, it is more Assessment Of Learning, allowing for students to demonstrate what they have learnt over the unit period. This assessment is something they have already completed in activities and would have been scaffolded throughout the unit. As this is an assessment task, the teaching has already occurred through previous activities.


Changing it from a full assessment to a teaching activity would involve adjusting the activity for example having the students draw an image of their house, labelling built and natural features, or have them draw complete the first section of the assessment as a scaffolded whole group task where the teacher aids students in the first section, getting them to complete the sentence as the assessment. However the question here would be whether the teacher is assessing English outcomes more than HSIE outcomes. If the assessment is left as is, students by expressing their thoughts through the drawings can be assessed on the HSIE subject matter. For the students that struggle to write legibly, they can write their sentence then narrate it to the teacher.

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