HSIE: Cultures Stage 1
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Interactive Ramadan: The Best Children’s Online Resources for Ramadan - Mango Salute - The art of greeting

Interactive Ramadan: The Best Children’s Online Resources for Ramadan - Mango Salute - The art of greeting | HSIE: Cultures Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Help your children learn more about Ramadan using the best resources available online. You can have a fun time in the process whether your youngster loves cooking or crafting, these tools will engage people of all ages!
Vicki Kimchi Hoang's insight:

Ramadan is an important practice of the Muslim culture and applies to those over the age of twelve where they undergo a period of fasting i.e. do not consume any liquid or food and refrain from making and malicious comments against each other.

 

Description of site:

This website provides a range of teaching resources that can be used to educate children on the practice of Ramadan, as well as the values that underpin this cultural practice. These resources range from arts/crafts, sweet recipes, worksheets and colouring prints. Additionally, it recommends several reputable picture books that aim to educate young children on the practice and values of Ramadan: Under the Ramadan Moon, Ramadan and My First Ramadan.

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Reading to children is an effective educational/teaching strategy for a number of reasons (Spence, 2004, p. 7):

Children generally love the sound of language and therefore, it is an effective and engaging teaching mediumProvides graphical representations to assist student’s understandingProvides the opportunity for discussion between the reader and listener around the concepts and ideas presented in the books and how it relates to the students

Moreover, concepts such as cultural practices can be difficult for young children to learn. Picture books are an effective alternative that condenses and simplifies complex ideas into a (relatively) short and engaging narrative. Under the Ramadan Moon is the simplest of the three suggested texts as it contains fewer, less complex text; however, the limited amount of text is strongly guided and supported by the generous amount of detailed illustrations (Doodling Through Life, 2013).  Comparatively, Ramadan and My First Ramadan would be considered more complex books as they are more detailed in their description of Ramadan, where illustrations are limited to a supporting role (Amazon, n.d.).

 

Teaching idea:

I would recommend choosing one of the suggested picture books to introduce young children to the Muslim practice of Ramadan. As some of the books are quite deep in content, it would be advised to stop at each page (or every other page, as stopping constantly may disrupt the fluency of the reading) and ask students to reflect on the provided information and clarify new words. For example, ‘fast/fasting’ is used but fast in this context means something different and the teacher needs to clarify what it means in this context. As Ramadan may be a new and foreign concept to many students, it is also another reason to pause and allow the students to process this new information. At the end of the reading, students can compose a mind map of the main ideas and values behind Ramadan. This conceptual task will reinforce students of their new understanding of Ramadan; to further this, and extend their vocabulary, a series of colouring sheets is also provided on this web source (direct link: https://app.box.com/shared/qziz6m1648). Each child can be given a letter to colour in (which corresponds to a word related to the cultural practice of Ramadan). Once completed the class can come together and discuss each letter/word.

 

 

Amazon. (n.d.). Retrieved 06 April 2014 from http://www.amazon.com/Ramadan-Own-Holidays-Susan-Douglass/dp/1575055848/ref=sr_1_7?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374179918&sr=1-7&keywords=ramadan+books

Spence, B. (2004). Reading aloud to children Pen 146. Newtown: PETAA

Doodling Through Life. (2013). In Under the Ramadan Moon Book Review. Retrieved 06 April 2014 from http://reemfaruqi.com/2013/10/27/under-the-ramadan-moon-book-review/

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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year | HSIE: Cultures Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Find out about some of the traditions, customs and stories linked to the celebration of Chinese New Year. Discover your Zodiac sign and the characteristics associated with each of the Zodiac animals.
Vicki Kimchi Hoang's insight:

Australia is a multi-cultural country where a significant portion of people are of Chinese background. These figures will continue to increase (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2013) where their customs and practices will increasingly shape the experience of people living in Australia, including young children. This can be simply seen in the food they share in Australia; Sydney has dedicated an area to Chinese cuisine and is referred to as ‘Chinatown’. Moreover, a number of events are held throughout the year that relate to Chinese traditions. The largest Chinese event organised is for the celebrations of Chinese New Year. As Chinese New Year celebrations is such a significant and reoccurring event, it is important to draw student’s attentions to the different cultural practices that appear in their immediate, socio-cultural environment.

 

Description of site:

This website is an excellent teacher resource for educating students of the cultural values (Chinese family celebrations) and practices/customs (Chinese New Year decorations, the lion and dragon dance, and the lantern festival) of Chinese New Year, with detailed information and an array of student activities on the event of Chinese New Year. In particular, the Chinese cultural belief of the Chinese Zodiac is highly appropriate for stage 1 students as it based around the concept of animals – a common interest in young children.

 

Teaching idea:

With this web resource, teachers can organise a number of activities with their students in regards to the Chinese Zodiac. For example, as a class determine and discuss which zodiac animal the class is and what it means to be that animal (i.e. the cultural characteristics and beliefs of that animal). By modelling the process of determining which zodiac animal a person is (that is, according to a person’s birthday year), a homework task can be set requiring students to seek out which zodiac animal their family members are and include a brief description of each animal.

Alternatively, you may wish to introduce the class to the story of the Chinese Zodiac instead. On this web resource, they have also compiled a reading of the Chinese Zodiac story in which the teacher can project on a smart board and read the story aloud to the whole class (direct link: http://www.topmarks.co.uk/chinesenewyear/ZodiacStory.aspx). Alternatively, there are a number of videos on YouTube that provide an audio and visual reading of the Chinese Zodiac story.

 

An idea for an assessment task and literacy strategy:

After the reading activity, teachers can then prepare a literacy task where students need to retell the story with their own illustrations and texts. This task will reinforce their understanding of Chinese practices/customs and assess an array of literacy skills, in particular their writing and representation literacy skills.

 

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics. (2013) Retrieved 10 April 2014, from http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/2071.0main+features902012-2013. ;

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Traditions from Around the World, how Birthdays are celebrated.

Traditions from Around the World, how Birthdays are celebrated. | HSIE: Cultures Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Birthday trtaditions from around the world - a site devoted to the celebration of birthdays including its origins and how people celebrate their birthdays.
Vicki Kimchi Hoang's insight:

Birthday celebrations is a common custom enjoyed worldwide (however, it is important to acknowledge that not all cultures celebrate birthdays) and is highly relatable to most children. Thus, exposing students to how different cultures celebrate birthdays will be an educational, relatable and engaging experience for many.

 

Description of site:

This web resource is an excellent teaching resource on cultural birthday celebrations as it includes a long list of how different countries celebrate the event of birthdays. It also includes some background knowledge into the concept of birthdays and the history of various birthday-related topics, such as the birthday parties, cakes, cards and the happy birthday song). This resource is also updated from time to time and is highly user-friendly (easy navigation with countries listed in alphabetical order) for teachers (and students) to utilise.

 

A teaching idea:

In using this web resource, a suggested teaching idea could entail the following. The class can be divided into groups of three or four; where each group is allocated a specific country to construct an informative collage illustrating how that country celebrates a person’s birthday. Teachers should provide specific directions on what they want the students to include in their collage. This may include how ‘happy birthday’ is said, what kind of food is used to celebrate, what is the concept of gifts in that country, and, any certain rituals or practices are taken place on this day. These themes are common across most countries listed in this web resource and hence will be ideal to include as students can identify similarities and differences between differing countries based on common themes.

In addition, as stage 1 students they may not have yet familiarised themselves with the ability to conduct research themselves; teachers can therefore collate the information from this web resource and print it out accordingly for each group. After the collage activity, the class can regroup where each group can present to the class what they have learnt about their assigned country. By having group presentations, this simultaneously educates other students while providing a holistic understanding on how different countries/cultures celebrate the common practice of birthdays. To conclude, as a class, discuss the similarities and differences on how different cultures celebrate the practice of birthdays, including any interesting customs they have learnt today. The teacher can be the scribe during this discussion and list their ideas on the class board.

 

Literacy strategy:

This activity links to an array of Stage 1 literacy outcomes in NSW English K-10 Syllabus 2012, such as writing (grammar, punctuation and vocabulary, as well as handwriting) and representation, and self-expression. In addition, student presentations and class discussions is an interactive learning experience that specifically addresses a number of content descriptors for the literacy outcome of speaking and listening. 

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The Rainbow Serpent - YouTube

Aboriginal Dreamtime Stories, Story by Dick Roughsey, Narrration by David Gulpilil, Soundtrack by Andrew Vial Photographed and edited by Alexander Cochran, A...
Vicki Kimchi Hoang's insight:

Dreamtime stories (story telling) are an integral part of life for Indigenous Australians; it is an oral tradition and practice, especially during childhood as it plays a vital educational role. The aim of these dreamtime stories were to explain life lessons to children, such as how the land came to be shaped and inhabited, how to behave, and where to find food. Dreamtime stories were usually told around a campfire or a landmark of significance by an Elder.

 

Description of site:

This video is a reading of The Rainbow Serpent, a famous and traditional dreamtime story that portrays the Rainbow Serpent as the creator of the landscape in Australia (cultural lesson and belief: how the land came to be shaped and inhabited).

 

Teaching idea:

Introducing students to these native stories is an excellent way to physically emphasise and demonstrate the Aboriginal practice and cultural value of dreamtime stories (as opposed to verbal teaching). The reason I have chosen an existing reading of The Rainbow Serpent, and this particular reading, is because it provides a more authentic (reading) representation of Dreamtime stories:

The story is read by David Gulpilil whom is an Indigenous Australian traditional dancer and actor; it may be useful to have a picture of him during the video to further aid student’s imagination of the reading. It is also important to draw student’s attention to the fact that the reading is by a respected Aboriginal person, as that’s how dreamtime stories are told in the Aboriginal culture.Traditional/cultural music of Indigenous Australians is also used in the reading which provides further insights into Indigenous traditions and customs.

To further contribute to the creativity and cultural authenticity of the reading, teachers can arrange a pretend campfire for the students to sit around as they view the audial and visual reading.

 

Literacy strategy:

As these stories are underpinned by cultural, educational values, the teacher can facilitate a class discussion on what the story is trying to convey and teach young Aboriginal students. This discussion will assess a range of literacy skills, such as student’s ability to respond to and compose texts (ENe-1A) (e.g. are they able to make inferences about character motives, actions, qualities and characteristics within the texts) and recognise that there are different kinds of texts with awareness of purpose, audience and subject matter (EN1-8B ) (NSW English K-10 Syllabus 2012).

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Clean Up The River

Clean Up The River | HSIE: Cultures Stage 1 | Scoop.it
Vicki Kimchi Hoang's insight:

An increasingly significant Australian practice is Clean Up Australia Day. The idea of this practice dates back to 1989 and is currently Australia’s largest community-based environment event/practice. It is therefore imperative to educate children the significance of this day and the values that underpin this practice i.e. Australia’s cultural embracement for sustainability and environment preservation.

 

Description of site:

This website provides a reflection into this practice and it’s values, and can be used as an effective tool to introduce or reinforce the idea of Clean Up Australia Day to young children. Students accessing this resource, students will be exposed to an educational game where they are on a mission to clean up the river.

 

Link to pedagogical research:

Some may question the potential of a game as a teaching medium; however, educational games have been supported by an array of research. Petsche (2011, p. 43) contends that such games provide teachers with an avenue to maintain student’s attention where the entertainment element of games enables students to retain information and “painlessly learn”. Research by Moreno-Ger, Burgos, Martinez-Ortiz, Sierra, and Fernandez-Manjon (2008) confirms this and asserts computer games are inherently rich and interactive which makes it an effective educational tool to increase student motivation and the quality of the learning experience.  Some educational elements/implications of this particular game include:

Highlighting to students the need to remove rubbish and waste appropriately to protect the environment and animals (the core intent of the gamer’s mission): amongst other things, a short clip is shown at the end of the game where rubbish is being assortedA song is played throughout the game that verses a number of sustainability ideas such as “When we litter, rubbish goes down the drain and to the river” and “We can help the environment by recycling correctly”; there is also the repetition of “We got to keep our country clean … pick it up and put it in the bin”At various intervals (checkpoints of the game’s route) throughout the game, information about sustainability is displayed and at the end students are required to complete a short multiple-choice quiz which is based on the provided information

 

Teaching idea and numeracy strategy:

This resource can also be linked to a numeracy strategy that addresses the Stage 1 outcomes of data in the NSW Mathematics K-10 Syllabus 2012 (MA1-1WM and MA1-17SP); at the end of the game, the student’s final score is shown (including the score for each type of collected rubbish). Student’s scores can be visualised or represented on a number line, demonstrating the numerical range in student’s scores. Building on from this, the mathematical tallying system can be introduced to stage 1 students through a homework task: students are to identify different types of rubbish around their house (as demonstrated in the game; e.g. plastic bottles, glass bottles, aluminium cans, food, etc.) and use the tallying system to calculate the amount of each type of rubbish.

 

A global perspective can also be added to this topic (sustainable futures), where students can be educated on what other countries are doing to preserve their environment and the world around them. This website (http://www.letsdoitworld.org/games/cleantheworld/index.html) is also another educational game and highlights how individual (or country) contributions has accumulative potential which can lead to collective change for the achievement of sustainable future. In this game, students are on a journey to clean up garbage from across the entire planet; it conveys that a starting point to a sustainable future requires individual efforts which then motivate others to do so too, and on a larger scale, other countries to do so as well.

 

 

Petsche, J. (2011). Engage and excite students with educational games. Knowledge Quest, 40, 1, pp. 43-44

Moreno-Ger, P., Burgos, D., Martinez-Ortiz, I., Sierra, J. L., and Fernandez-Manjon, B. (2008). Educational game design for online education. Computers in Human Behaviour, 24, pp. 2530-2540. 

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