HSIE Cultures of people in the local community
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HSIE Cultures of people in the local community
Selected resources for Stage 2 students to learn about Cultures (CUS2.3 and CUS2.4)
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8ways - home

8ways - home | HSIE Cultures of people in the local community | Scoop.it
Anna James's insight:

This website is fabulous resource for teachers to integrate Aboriginal pedagogies into their classroom. The 8 ways of Aboriginal learning will teach students about Aboriginal culture.  There is a link on the website that teaches how to embed Aboriginal perspectives into the classroom.  The first step looks at introducing storytelling or yarning and teaching the students how it is an important part of Aboriginal culture.   Secondly, the idea of place is introduced and how a sense of place (physical and emotional) symbolizes Aboriginal identity.  Another important aspect that is looked at is the use of symbols and how they contribute to identity.  The link goes through each of the 8 ways and includes suggestions on how to integrate them.

 

A fantastic activity for the class would be to develop their own ways of learning based on the 8 ways. The 8 ways is about identifying local Aboriginal values, systems, protocols and processes and then integrating them into the classroom.  The class could engage with the local Aboriginal community to create their ways of learning. This would teach the students about collaboration.  It would also “ensure that Aboriginal voices are effectively incorporated into the curriculum” (Board of Studies, 2008).   

 

Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved from

http://ab-ed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf

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Alexis King's curator insight, September 13, 2013 7:29 AM

It is important to integrate Aboriginal ways and processes of learning into our classrooms also.

Annette Cullinan's curator insight, September 17, 2013 11:37 PM

Aboriginal perspectives

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In My Shoes

In an exploration of everyday life, a group of young people living in Melbourne take us into their world through photos of their community, culture, family a...
Anna James's insight:

This youtube clip ‘In My Shoes’ was put together as part of the ‘Snapshots from Oz’ series of short films.  It is a series of photographs taken by young people in Melbourne.  There are snapshots of different aspects of their communities and cultures including food, faith, sport and social life.  Many of these aspects are often referred to as subcultures which are not separate entities but overlap between cultures (Gilbert, Hoepper, 2011, p.289).  It is a great resource as it gives an indication of the diversity in Australia.  I would show this clip to demonstrate how diversity can be represented. 

 

An idea for a project would be to get the students to create a similar short film based on the local community.  The students would be encouraged to take photographs of daily life and cultural events and put together a short film through their eyes.  These could then be watched during a cultural day at school.   On the day, students would be encouraged to wear their national costume and bring food from their ethnic background.  This would teach the students how diverse their local community is and about the backgrounds of people in the local community.  It would also foster an appreciation of the different backgrounds and how they contribute richly to society.  The cultural day could be celebrated across the school and parents could have stalls with their local cuisine that students could sample.  This would promote the school community which is another community the students belong to.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Home - City of Parramatta

Home - City of Parramatta | HSIE Cultures of people in the local community | Scoop.it
Profile home
Anna James's insight:

This website is a great source for statistics about people living in the local community.  The information is gathered from the National census and it is an excellent tool for building a demographic profile of a particular area.  I am looking at the local community in Parramatta but the same information can be found for any suburb in Australia. 

 

There is data about ancestry and the students could use this to chart the different backgrounds and the percentage of people from each background. They could also chart religions, languages and countries of birth.  This would link to the mathematics curriculum. Another task the students could do is have a worksheet where they need to find certain statistics and information from the website, this would develop their research skills.  There is a section on the website that refers to settlement history which looks at how the area has changed since it was first settled.  The students could compare the origins and backgrounds of the people in the local community at time of settlement to now.  They would need to research the original inhabitants of the area, the Dharug Aboriginals. 

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Worldwide Culture Swap

Worldwide Culture Swap | HSIE Cultures of people in the local community | Scoop.it
Anna James's insight:

Worldwide culture swap is a fantastic example of how children can be educated about different cultures.  Identity and cultural diversity is one of the five learning emphases of global education (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008).  This website is a tool for children to learn about different cultures globally.   The idea of the website is to link children, families or schools from across the globe.   They send each other packages that represent their country.  Examples of items that could be sent include letters, souvenirs, different food items, flags, drawings or photographs.  Written skills and geographical skills are developed as well as creative thinking when deciding what items can be used to represent their culture. 

 

This website looks at swapping cultures globally but it could easily be translated to a classroom culture swap.  Each student could be asked to create a package from their background and present back to the class.  This would educate students on the different cultures of people in the local community and how they contribute to Australian identity.  If there was not a broad representation of the local community in the classroom, different cultures could be allocated to a group of students.  The students would have to research that culture and prepare a presentation on their findings.  They would be encouraged to identify linguistic and religious diversity and different customs that are followed.

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Canberra, Australia: Author.

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Education » Yirra Yaakin

Education » Yirra Yaakin | HSIE Cultures of people in the local community | Scoop.it
Anna James's insight:

Yirra Yaakin is an Aboriginal theatre company.  They have developed 12 original productions that are designed to teach students about contemporary and traditional Aboriginal culture.   The current production that schools can bring in to perform is Kaarla Kaatiji which is a modern adaptation of an Aboriginal Dreaming story.  This production focuses on the Noongar language and culture. 

 

I think a theatre production is a great resource as it is a medium students may not have had much exposure to.  The Arts are an important representation of a particular culture (Sinclair, Jeannret, O’Toole, 2008). It is a great way to learn about Aboriginal culture through story telling.  However, students would need to learn about the role and meaning of performance in Indigenous culture to appreciate and contextualise (Gilbert, Hoepper, 2011, p.392) the theatre performance.

 

The Noongar culture is from Western Australia, students could learn about the Aboriginal culture in their local community by having an elder from the local Aboriginal community speak to them.  In groups, students could be asked to find an Aboriginal Dreaming story from their local community and retell it in a theatrical way, this would also link to the Drama curriculum.   This would be a project they could then perform for their peers which would educate other students about Dreaming stories.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, VIC: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Sinclair, C., Jeannret, N. & O’Toole, J. (2008). Education in the Arts – teaching and learning in the contemporary curriculum. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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