HSIE CUES1 - Teaching Kindergarten Students About Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Others
621 views | +0 today
Follow
HSIE CUES1 - Teaching Kindergarten Students About Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Others
Resources for teaching Early Stage 1 students in HSIE classes about the characteristics, desires and abilities of students
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Angela E Patterson
Scoop.it!

The Rainbow Fish

By Marcus Pfister. Read by Ernest Borgnine. The Rainbow Fish is an award-winning book about a beautiful fish who finds friendship and happiness when he learn...
Angela E Patterson's insight:

This online streaming video comes from, www.storylineonline.net/, a site constructed by the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Foundation. It provides links to several popular children's stories narrated by SAG members, with accompanying animations. This video for the story 'The Rainbow Fish' (Marcus Pfister), read by Ernest Borgnine, features animal characters to explore the concepts of individuality, desires and the ability to share.

 

As such, this online story could be used as a base from which to explore the characteristics of others in the Early Stage 1 classroom. The teacher could start with an initial group discussion, asking students about the characteristics that were both similar and those that differentiated the rainbow fish from the other fish. Responses could be recorded by the teacher on the board using a Venn diagram, where two circles representing 'Rainbow Fish' and 'other fish' overlap and similarities are recorded in the central circle, differences in the outer components of the circles. Here a teacher would be assessing children on their capacity to listen and respond orally to a visual text and communicate effectively using agreed interpersonal conventions (incorporates NSW English K-6 Syllabus outcomes: TES1.1 and TES1.2).

 

After presenting this as a scaffold for understanding characteristics, a further activity could entail student discussion on characteristics that vary within the classroom and selection of a particular attribute (e.g. hair colour) from which to perform a graphing activity. Here, as a class, and afterwards individually, the number of students with different hair colour would be counted and the categorical data represented in a pie or bar chart  (incorporates NSW Mathematics K-6 Syllabus outcome: DES1.1). Research shows that incorporating literature into mathematics instruction enables students of differing achievement levels to be engaged in a meaningful and comfortable context, resulting in a richer and deeper understanding of the mathematical concepts (Hellwig, Monroe, & Jacobs, 2000).   

 

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Hellwig, Stacey J., Monroe, Eula Ewing & Jacobs, James S. (2000). Making Informed Choices: Selecting Children’s Trade Books for Mathematics Instruction. Teaching Children Mathematics, 7(3), 138–143. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela E Patterson
Scoop.it!

Behind the News - 17/11/2009: Indigenous Language

Behind the News - 17/11/2009: Indigenous Language | HSIE CUES1 - Teaching Kindergarten Students About Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Others | Scoop.it
The language we speak shows a lot about who we are and where we come from In the Northern Territory theres a fight over which languages are used to teach kids in school Aboriginal communities are
Angela E Patterson's insight:

 

This link on the Behind The News website features a short video from 2009 that explores a debate over which language (English or the local Indigenous language, 'Walpiri') should be the focus of instruction in a primary school in Lajamanu, Northern Territory. The clip includes snippets of children communicating in their native language, working in the classroom, and discussing their dreams, and shows different parts of the school grounds. As such, it provides some good images and quotes from which to explore the similarities and differences in the characteristics and desires of these young Indigenous students compared with the kindergarten class one is teaching. It has also been selected on the basis that it provides a sensitive and objective portrayal of the context, values and practices of a specific Aboriginal culture (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2009). 

 

While this provides a good source of content for incorporating an Indigenous perspective, Yunkaporta & Kirby (2011) suggest that an effective way to genuinely deliver this perspective is to move beyond teaching about Indigenous culture as content to incorporating Indigenous pedagogy. That is, learning through the Indigenous culture. They discuss eight Aboriginal pedagogies in their book chapter, including using learning maps, story sharing, land links and community links. As such, an effective way for teachers to use this linked video within an Indigenous perspective would include both presenting the content to draw on similarities and differences between the students in their own and the shown school, within an activity that incorporates an Indigenous pedagogy.

  

 

References:

 

NSW Department of Education and Training, (2009). Aboriginal Education and Training Policy. An Introductory Guide. Sydney: NSW DET Aboriginal Education and Training Directorate. Retrieved from: https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/students/access_equity/aborig_edu/implementation_2_PD20080385.shtml

 

Yunkaporta, T., & Kirby, M. (2011). Yarning up Indigenous pedagogies: A dialouge about eight Aboriginal ways of learning. In Purdie, N., Milgate, G., & Bell, H., R. (Eds.), Two way teaching and Learning (pp. 205-214). Melbourne: ACER Press.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela E Patterson
Scoop.it!

Justine Clarke - I Like To Sing

I Like To Sing is a joyful collection of cool songs for kids and features the vocal talents of Justine Clarke from ABC TV's Play School and the songs of Play...
Angela E Patterson's insight:

This video clip features Justine Clarke singing a song she composed titled 'I Like to Sing'. This song explores the different things Justine enjoys to do, and as such would form a useful base to explore the similarities and differences in Early Stage 1 students desires and interests. Research has found that music is a fun way to help children internalise concepts and is particularly useful for engaging children with special needs (Lock & Rothman, 2006).

 

An activity could be an initial scaffold involving class discussion of 'what Justine likes', then broadening the question to exploring what students in the class like to do. From here the statement 'I like to....' could be written on the board and the task for students would be to write this down and add one thing that they enjoy doing, along with a picture to depict this interest. Afterwards the students could be instructed to ask two other students what they like and report this back to the teacher, demonstrating that they are sampling amongst their peers. Assessment here would include the student’s writing and art sample, which would examine their capacity to compose a simple text and express themselves through handwriting, and their ability to communicate with peers and the teacher about what two other students ‘like’ (indicators for NSW English K-6 Syllabus outcomes: TES1.1; TES1.2; WES1.9; WES1.10).  

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Lock, R. H., & Rothman, M. (2006). Use Music in the Classroom. Intervention in School and Clinic, 41(5), 307-309.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela E Patterson
Scoop.it!

Teaching Kindergarten how to draw a self portrait

Come check out more great ideas to teach you mini's art at MiniMatisse.blogspot.com
Angela E Patterson's insight:

This short online video guides one through a method of teaching Early Stage 1 students how to draw a self-portrait, using much vocabulary related to shape and position. As such it would provide a useful starting step to explore the different characteristics of students. An activity here could include the teacher using this technique to model the steps in drawing one's face, utilising a mirror (and potentially adapting to incorporate colour into the picture), and leaving this as a visible template for students to refer to. Students could then be given the material of paper, lead and coloured pencils, and a mirror, and instructed to draw their face in a similar way, making their characteristics clear (e.g. red hair, freckles). Once completed, slots could be allocated for students to give a brief oral presentation about their artwork that focuses on describing their characteristics, including the shapes and numbers of particular features on their face, and the teacher could pose questions for group discussion about what makes certain portraits similar and different.

 

Assessment here would entail the portrait work (looking for evidence of understanding the features of their face and the ability to represent two-dimensional, closed shapes without tracing), the oral presentation describing characteristics of their face, and the student's capacity to contribute appropriately to group discussion about the similarities and differences in student facial characteristics (NSW English K-6 Syllabus outcomes: TES1.1, TES1.2; NSW Mathematics K-6 Syllabus outcome: MES1.2). 

 

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Board of Studies NSW (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Angela E Patterson
Scoop.it!

World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | HSIE CUES1 - Teaching Kindergarten Students About Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Others | Scoop.it
Angela E Patterson's insight:

This link, titled 'Photo kit: A Day in the Life of 5 Children', within the World Vision Australia website provides the resources of: images and information on five children from different places in the world (Philippines; Gaza; Mongolia; Zambia and Honduras) covering the topics of school, play, family, home and chores, along with additional information; suggested teaching activities; and a related student handout.  It has been selected as it is an authentic and culturally respectful informational source about other peoples and cultures (Curriculum Corporation, 2008) and because it would be a great resource to explore the similarities and differences in characteristics, desires and abilities of students of a similar age and grade in another, less economically fortunate location to their own. In addition, as implicated by Calder (2000), embedding empathy and a concern for social justice are key elements in teaching a global perspective, and if done effectively can be an empowering learning experience for students and the school community, and this would prove a good resource for achieving this.

 

A teaching activity here could be to select one of the five stories and read this to the class in conjunction with the related PowerPoint photographs. From here the class could participate in a discussion on the similarities and differences between students in this class and the child described in terms of their characteristics, abilties and desires. Assessment here would entail student's capacity to contribute appropriately to group discussion about these similarities and differences (NSW English K-6 Syllabus outcomes: TES1.1; TES1.2). 

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (1998). English K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies.

 

Calder, M. (2000). A concern for justice: Teaching using a global perspective in the classroom. Theory into Practice, 39(2), 81-87.

 

Curriculum Corporation, (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Quittner, K., & Sturak, K. Victoria Australia: Education Services Australia

more...
No comment yet.