HSIE - Climate Change
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HSIE - Climate Change
The resources 'scooped' below are useful for Stage 3 students investigating the effects of increasing greenhouse gases and climate change on the earth. Enjoy!
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Rescooped by Katelan Attwells from DIGITAL EDUCATION
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Climate Kids | Great Websites for Kids

Climate Kids | Great Websites for Kids | HSIE - Climate Change | Scoop.it

Via Natassa Dourvetaki, GSeremetakis
Katelan Attwells's insight:

‘Climate Kids’ demonstrates an understanding of the interconnectedness between Australia and global environments and how individuals and groups can act in an ecologically responsible manner. It is a very educational and content heavy website that students in Stage 3 would enjoy exploring and offers clear answers to questions regarding global climate change through sections on water, air, the ocean and more! Similar to EPA’s ‘A Students Guide to Global Climate Change’, this online resource covers all aspects associated with the topic, however encompasses a variety of links to other valuable websites. “The possible areas of exploration are unlimited and using ICT supports cross-curriculum or integrated approaches.” (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 182) Students will further develop their role as a text participant when examining the website.

Teaching Idea: ‘Schools Tree Day’ is an event held once a year in which anyone can participate in the maintenance or improvement of the environment by planting a tree! This could be a really neat excursion for students, especially after learning about the importance trees play in maintaining a balance in our environment and tackling Climate Change. “Service learning is a form of experiential learning in which students participate in and contribute to some community service activity in order to develop their skills and understanding of an aspect of society or environment”. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 174)

Assessment Task: Each student is asked to write a letter to our Prime Minister (Julia Gillard) outlining their feelings toward Climate Change and the preventative measures society can take to slow the process. A literacy link is established here, as students must demonstrate their best formal writing skills. 

 

Gilbert, R. Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. Australia. Cengage Learning Australia

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A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change | US EPA

A Student's Guide to Global Climate Change | US EPA | HSIE - Climate Change | Scoop.it

Via Sarantis Chelmis, David Lechner
Katelan Attwells's insight:

‘A Student’s Guide to Global Climate Change’ is an informative resource that is worth noting. It provides an exceptional introduction to Climate Change and presents valid and interesting information in regards to the impacts associated with this change and the solutions/preventions individuals can take to help slow the process. It is interactive by nature, easy to navigate and uses simplistic language appropriate for students in Stage 3. Teachers must demonstrate sensitivity when teaching about climate change, as the concept can be quite overwhelming and potentially upsetting to children – this resource, specifically targeted at children, does not represent a confronting view and is purely informative.

Student’s gain a global perspective and understand that Climate Change is affecting the whole world and not just the country in which we live. This is important in deciphering the severity and scale of this phenomenon.

Teaching Idea: As a class, brainstorm other changes in the environment as a result of the human population/mankind eg deforestation, species extinction, pollution, whaling, oil spills, development etc. Divide students into groups of five and allocate them a particular topic to investigate and present a PowerPoint presentation to the class.  

Assessment Task: Students will complete an information report. They will commence with a scaffold provided by the classroom teacher with questions to be answered using the information presented on the website (comprehension based). Students will then write a report, which will be handed in and graded for assessment purposes. As part of the criteria, they must write in correct format of a report, thus creating a cross-curricula link to literacy. “Integrating the internet into the curriculum is a major step that teachers can take to provide their students with opportunities to develop literacy skills.” (Winch, 2010, p. 400)

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2010). Literacy : reading, writing and children’s literature (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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