HSIE: change and continuity
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HSIE: change and continuity
Stage 3: family, school, local, national and global events, issues, problems and trends
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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | HSIE: change and continuity | Scoop.it
Farzana Jamaldeen's insight:

This source illustrates an indigenous language map of Australia. It details Aboriginal Australia. The map represents large language groups including smaller groups of people- clans, dialects and individual languages within any one group. The source acknowledges that this map is in fact one of many sources representing Aboriginal Australia. Moreover, the source highlights that this publication is a reflection of the author’s views and not of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Thus, the purpose of this map is solely a verified representation and illustration of Aboriginal Australia. Through further investigation, this source originated, and was first published in the Encyclopedia of Aboriginal Australia. Thus, indicating that it is a reliable source.

 

Teachers can use this language map to assess students’ knowledge in terms of how the Australian states and territories have changed. One classroom activity could involve students’ approximating the current state borders of Australia onto the language map. Students can also determine which language group was spoken in the area of their local community.  This requires, and develops, students’ use of grids, space, area, and distance skills. Other activities could involve students’ researching how democratic practices ran during Aboriginal Australia and compare how democracy is administered in Australia today.

 

These activities will reveal new understandings (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p. 101) about Indigenous societies in Australia. By comparing and contrasting democracy of today with that of Aboriginal Australia, students’ are able to understand and appreciate similarities and differences between two diverse societies.

 

References

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Long Journey : Young lives

Long Journey : Young lives | HSIE: change and continuity | Scoop.it
Farzana Jamaldeen's insight:

“Long Journey, Young Lives” is an interactive site that provides students’ with the opportunity to share in on the experiences of young refugees from around the world. These countries include Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and Iraq. Most of the refugees are of the same age as stage 3 students in Australia. Short film clips documents their experiences based on homeland conflict, their journeys’, life in detention, and reflections on living in Australia. Each of these four topics have further comprehensive links to information on government policies on asylum seeking, what people smuggling is, conditions in camps, Australia as a multicultural nation, among many other resources.

 

A teaching idea could start off with getting the students to write their own definitions of what they think a refugee is. As a class, brainstorm and list possible reasons that may lead someone to becoming a refugee. Or, name some countries that refugees who live in Australia have come from. Now, get the students to compare their definitions and ideas of what a refugee entails with that of a fact sheet. For further class discussion, discuss the difference between asylum seeker, refugee, migrant and illegal migrant.

 

For an assessment task, students can choose a case study on a refugee’s experience and write up an exposition. The focus question could be, “Should Australia provide refugees with asylum? Why/why not?” This assessment task overlaps with literacy strategies, as it requires students to provide reasons, evidence and explanations for their opinions.  Students can further reflect on their feelings associated with flight and relocation.

 

The terms “refugees” and “asylum seekers” are no stranger to the media. Since the content presented in the media is exposed to students’ in their everyday lives, it seems fitting to “reveal new understandings about society and environment” (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p. 101). Teachers are able to help students link something that is unfamiliar to something else that is less strange. This way, students can develop a broader, more deeper understanding of national and global issues.

 

References

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

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DD Units - Guide Govt & Law - Ch 1 - Aust Democ

DD Units - Guide Govt & Law - Ch 1 - Aust Democ | HSIE: change and continuity | Scoop.it
Farzana Jamaldeen's insight:

This educational site provides ample information on Australian democracy. It discusses the changing notions of democracy in Australia from the late 1700’s to 1901. Here, ideas such as colonies, constitutions, interest groups, and electoral systems are investigated. This site provides a list of key parliamentary terms that interrelate with democracy in Australia. For teachers, there are numerous teaching ideas that provide a foundation for setting sessions on Australian democracy in class.

 

Students can construct a timeline detailing the changes to Australian democracy. Using butcher paper, students are to use ten centimeters intervals equating to ten-year intervals on their timelines. Space should be provided around each interval so that the student is able to add information or comments under a specific time period. This task requires some numeracy strategies such as measurement skills as the intervals on the timeline have to be evenly spaced out.

 

In order to assess how the Australian democratic nation was made, students can create a news report. The teacher can decide whether this report is to be written or spoken. This task is appropriate to students’ as it promotes deep learning and high order thinking. Here, students’ manipulate information, take it apart, then transform what they already know about Australian democracy, to create meaning in a “new” light; something beyond surface learning (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, pp. 102-103) .  With this in mind, students are able to reflect on how democracy is not only bound in the Australian government, but rather, a part of their everyday lives in families, schools, local, national and global matters. 

 

References

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Welcome to Kidsview - Parliament in Focus, Parliamentary Education Office, Commonwealth Parliament of Australia

Welcome to Kidsview - Parliament in Focus, Parliamentary Education Office, Commonwealth Parliament of Australia | HSIE: change and continuity | Scoop.it
Farzana Jamaldeen's insight:

KidsView is an interactive site for teachers, students and parents alike. The content in the site is parliamentary orientated. In regards to Australian democracy, students are able to utilize the site for activities such as putting together a puzzle of the Australian flag. For every correct move, facts about Australian democracy are revealed.  For teachers, a detailed account of the HSIE outcome relating to the development of the principles of Australian democracy is provided. The site also provides a range of key questions, class activities and resources that may aid teaching notions of Australian democracy at a stage 3 level.

 

One teaching idea could involve the whole class taking part in a vote based on democratic decision-making practices. Assign students’ various roles, ensuring that students’ contribute equally. A decision is reached through a majority vote.  The assessment can run throughout the role-play, but in order to consolidate observations, students’ can write up critical reflections based on that experience and acquired knowledge on Australian democracy. For instance, questions in the reflection can address students’ past experiences or encounters of democratic or undemocratic practices, and how it made them feel or think.  

 

As this task involves reflection, students’ are required to engage in deep learning (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p. 101) where they are required to think critically, rearranging, deconstructing, and reconstructing their thoughts; allowing students’ to explain what democracy means to them from their unique points of view.

 

References

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

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Number of refugees seeking asylum here continues to rise

Number of refugees seeking asylum here continues to rise | HSIE: change and continuity | Scoop.it
MORE than 120 asylum seekers arrived on three boats over the weekend with new UNHCR figures showing refugee claims in Australia are increasing five times faster than the rest of the world.
Farzana Jamaldeen's insight:

This article is about the recent influx of refugees seeking asylum in Australia. Although this article is short, it still provides significant statistics. Recent figures suggest that Australia is taking in refugees fives time more faster than any other country in the world. A UN report found that Australia took in 16000 asylum claims in 2012. This is a 37 per cent increase compared to the 8 per cent increase across 44 other industrialized nations.

 

Allow students to research some statistics of refugees seeking asylum in Australia over the past few years so that they are able to create their own fact sheet on refugees in Australia. Create a task such as a “letter to the editor.” Here, students are able to write out their concerns on topics such as “influx of asylum seekers in Australia”, or get students to question, “how does democracy in Australia influence your perspective of refugees seeking asylum?” Using literary skills, this task requires students to think critically about what is being said in the newspaper article, how this shapes their opinions on the matter, and reflect on the issues raised. Thus in turn, makes them question, and compare refugee policies in Australia with other parts of the world for instance.

 

 For an assessment task, students can create informative posters on refugees seeking asylum in Australia. This allows students to develop, understand and distinguish between key terms such as “refugee”, “migrant” and “asylum”. Students are able to investigate the reasons behind people seeking asylum from various parts in the world.  This task encourages students’ to search for accurate information using a variety of sources and standpoints. It is important to recognize the voices of marginalized groups in society because they are often overshadowed by the dominant groups (Gilbert & Hoepper 2011, p. 102). Using these activities, students’ are able to explain how refugees have shaped one aspect of the development of current Australian identities.

 

References

 

McDonald, H., & Gilbert, R. (2011). Planning for student learning. In R. Gilbert, & B. Hoepper (Eds.), Teaching Society and Environment (pp. 99-121). Australia: Cengage Learning Australia.

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