HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays
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HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays
Web resources selected for Stage One HSIE to assist in the teaching of CCS1.1
Curated by Lauren Moore
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Difference Differently

Difference Differently | HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays | Scoop.it
Lauren Moore's insight:

The Difference Differently site, created by Together for Humanity, is a wonderful resource which can be used when teaching the 'Change and Continuity' as well as the 'Cultures' strand of HSIE. In particular, the "Our Communities" Special Days section is relevant when teaching about the origins of special days and festivals.

 

As these are children's responses, there is not a great amount of detail regarding the origin of the celebrations. For this reason, the resource would provide a good starting point for the subject matter as it provides short, age and ability appropriate student writings on their "special" day. These responses range from religious celebrations such as Easter and Diwali, to cultural celebrations such as ANZAC Day and Chinese New Year.

 

Modelling the format of the resource, students could display their understanding of this aspect of CCS1.1 by researching and producing their own synopsis of a day or festival which is special to them and their family focussing on the origin of the celebration which could then be made into a class book to be referred to in further activities. As HSIE students in Stage One are beginning to move away from an egocentric view of the world to a slightly broader focus, this activity is appropriate for their developmental stage as it is still very connected to the childs personal experiences, however through investigation it allows consideration of an event from a broader perspective.

 

As was stated, this activity allows students to relate their personal experiences to a broader context helping them to make sense of these experiences and the world (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 12). Through this personal connection to the activity, students motivation to participate increases as they feel a sense of control over their learning which in turn leads to heightened engagement with the task (McInerney & McInerney, 2010, p. 205), ultimately contributing to a "love of learning" (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 7), one of the goals of the syllabus.

 

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Mothers Day History ~ The Complete History of Mother's Day

Mothers Day History ~ The Complete History of Mother's Day | HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays | Scoop.it
Information about Julia Ward Howe, Anna M. Jarvis and Mothers Day history. Learn about country customs and traditions, find historical background info, and read about how the holiday is celebrated in countries around the world.
Lauren Moore's insight:

This website provides a comprehensive history of mother's day celebrations from the Ancient Egyptians to the contemporary celebration we know it as today. This resource would be most suitable as a tool for teachers to use when preparing their activities as it is too dense with a challenging vocabulary for Stage One students.

 

Using the website as a reference, the teacher could create signs with the various dates and groups who have celebrated mothers and with high levels of scaffolding, have students create a human timeline with the teacher briefly explaining the importance and events of each stage. This activity links well with the Mathematics Time outcome, and more importantly will illustrate to students the history of the day in which we now celebrate. This observation of the different celebrations will also allow students to grasp the evolutionary nature of celebrations, which is important for this particular celebration due to the changing face of  families today (single parents, same sex parents, etc.) to ensure that students do not feel excluded and that they can connect to the activity whatever their familial situation, providing a safe environment where all students feel valued to ensure an environment that respects cultural and social diversity (Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs, 2008, p. 7).

 

Allowing students the opportunity to critically analyse within HSIE is a fundamental requirement which is reflected in De Bono's Black and Yellow hat thinking. After providing students the information about Anna Jarvis' contribution to today's Mother's Day celebration and her opposition to the commercialisation of the celebration (links below may also be useful for this), have students use the yellow and black thinking hats to brainstorm as a class the pros and cons of the situation. Then have students individually decide whether they agree with Anna's protests or whether they believe Mother's Day should stay as it is and use the drama strategy of 'conscience alley' to voice their opinion in a persuasive manner.   

 

Useful Resources:

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/394035/Mothers-Day

 

http://news.nationalgeographic.com.au/news/2012/05/110511-mothers-day-dark-history-jarvis-nation-gifts-facts/

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Chinese New Year — History.com Video

Chinese New Year — History.com Video | HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays | Scoop.it
The 15-day long Chinese New Year celebration originated from an ancient Chinese legend of the monster Nian.
Lauren Moore's insight:

NOTE: this video does not seem to be supported by internet explorer but does play in firefox.

 

This video produced by the History Channel provides a succinct explanation of the origins of Chinese New Year or, Spring Festival. It gives insight into the traditional legend of Nian before detailing some of the customs surrounding the festival as well as the reasons behind these customs.

Although engaging and factual, this video contains some vocabulary which may be beyond the understanding of Stage One students. For this reason it is suggested that teachers create a word bank prior to viewing the video, discussing the meanings of words with students to aid their understanding of the video. Alternatively, if it is decided that the content is above the level of the particular class, the teacher could play the video with no sound providing his or her own commentary, based on the video content, that is at a suitable level for their students. This is an important distinction to be made by the teacher as an understanding of vocabulary is paramount to the meaning gained by students (Winch, Johnston, March, Ljungdahl & Holliday, 2010, p. 57).

After viewing the video, students could participate in a drama activity to display their understanding of the legend of Nian, hence highlighting their understanding of the origin of Chinese New Year. In small groups, of about 4, students will be given a section of the legend to depict in a still image that the rest of the class will discuss.

As this video highlights the importance of the lunar calendar in the Chinese New Year celebrations, a curriculum link could be made with the mathematics measurement-time outcome MS1.5 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 113). The teacher could facilitate a whole class investigation into the differences between the Lunar and Western calendars and then students could find and record the date for the current year's Chinese New Year celebrations on a Western calendar.

Exploring the origin of Chinese New Year is relevant for students in Australian schools as we live in a multicultural society and this is a celebration which would be familiar to the majority of students, if only at a superficial level. This exploration of the origin and how this affects the customs practiced today is important in presenting Chinese New Year as part of dynamic and contemporary culture (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 289-290).

 

After exploring the origins of the festival and its customs, some other helpful resources to build student understanding that could be incorporated into future lessons include:

 

http://learnenglishkids.britishcouncil.org/en/short-stories/my-favourite-day-chinese-new-year

 

http://nmolp.britishmuseum.org/webquests/webquest.php?webquest_id=6&partner_id=brim

 

http://www.sydneychinesenewyear.com/about/traditions-and-customs/

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harmony-day-2013-factsheet.pdf

Lauren Moore's insight:

The above factsheet on Harmony Day is a great way for students to 'dig deeper' into the purpose and origin of the event. This event has personal significance to students as it is celebrated in most schools and therefore will understand the value and actively participate in the activity (NSW Department of Education and Training, 2003, pp. 14-15).

 

Although stemming from the Change and Continuity strand, exploration into the origin of Harmony Day will lead to an understanding of its purpose (to celebrate Australia's diversity) providing an authentic link with the Cultures strand allowing students to consolidate their learning and create deeper meaning.

 

Approaching HSIE as 'participation in society' (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 15), the teacher could briefly and simply explain to students the political context in which Harmony Day was conceived - as part of a Federal Government education campaign to address racism. After a class discussion on the importance of diversity, students could then write a letter to a friend explaining to them why Harmony Day began and its continuing importance today.

 

This exploration of Harmony Day could be linked with school celebrations of the event providing students the opportunity to become actively involved in their learning through participation.

 

The following website may be useful in teacher understanding of the Howard Government 'Living in Harmony' policy that developed Harmony Day:

http://www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au/doc/immdept_4.pdf

 

 

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Australia Day - Invasion Day - Creative Spirits

Australia Day - Invasion Day - Creative Spirits | HSIE CCS1.1 Origins of Important Days and Holidays | Scoop.it
Most Australians celebrate Australia Day as the day Australia was founded.

In contrast, Aboriginal people mourn their history and call it ‘Invasion Day’.
Lauren Moore's insight:

The Creative Spirits website provides a variety of information regarding various aspects of Aboriginal culture and identity with this particular page dedicated to the contentious issue of Australia Day/Invasion Day which is important for ALL Australians to carefully consider.

 

This would be recommended as a resource for teachers to use to gain an understanding of the issue before presenting it to students. This teacher understanding is vital as their attitude towards Indigenous issues can negatively influence how students view themselves as well as relationships with Indigenous people (Harrison, 2007, p. 42).

Although not created by an Indigenous Australian, when evaluated using the provided selection criteria, this resource is appropriate for use in the classroom as information has been provided by various Indigenous Australians and was presented to the Aboriginal Studies Association Conference, as well as being archived by the National Library of Australia. This resource also does not perpetuate the idea of 'terra nullius', or the stereotype that views "...Indigenous people as a homogenous group" (Harrison, 2007, p. 50) through the use of language such as 'most' and 'many' to highlight that a differing of opinion exists.

 

A complementary resource which could be used for students is the companion website to the First Australian documentary produced by SBS (http://www.programs.sbs.com.au/firstaustralians/content/). This website provides short video snippets which could be viewed by students with teacher guidance and scaffolding. After viewing the short video, the teacher could lead a disucssion about how students would feel if their home was taken away and how the continuing impact of these actions affects some Indigenous people's attitude towards Australia Day. Incorporating the skills of visual literacy from English, students could then participate in a whole class analysis of images depicting the arrival of the British from an Indigenous perspective (such as work by Gordon Syron), allowing students to understand the "shared history" (Cavanagh, 2011) of Australia's colonisation from an Indigenous perspective which is at the core of the issue for Indigenous Australians. This activity, allows students to consider a perspective they may have never encountered which is important (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, pp. 58-59) in the study of HSIE and other KLAs, as well as providing a degree of distance for students through tracing the history of the issue (Noctor & Baines, 1984, as cited in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p. 95).

 

 

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