HSIE CCES1
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HSIE CCES1
Change and Contiuity Early Stage 1: Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate heritage of self and others.
Curated by Casey Lee Rich
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Family History - made simple

A simple explanation of family history work and everything you need to know to get started learning about your ancestors.
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

This resource is a short, animated video that explains the concept of genealogy in clear, simple terms. The video demonstrates the benefits of studying family history and suggests methods for researching, including online research and speaking with living relatives. The video is engaging in that it focuses on people and their stories in order to present relevant information. It also keeps the individual at the centre and continually addresses students, for instance, “your family”, “you might discover things you have in common” and, “how you got such big ears”.

 

The video starts with what the students already know, “we all have families”, before linking this to new information, making it easier for younger children to follow.

At the conclusion of the video, students are informed that learning about where they come from will help them to know more about who they are and gain a sense of purpose and belonging. This is a central theme of the family heritage topic.

 

The video would be ideal to introduce early stage 1 to the topic of family and heritage. Students would be asked to view and listen to the video, and then respond in some way, potentially through class discussion. The teacher might then draw together the ideas the children have taken from the video by constructing a class mind map on the board or on poster paper. As the class discussion progresses, the students’ own ideas and knowledge would be added to those presented in the video, as well as any questions students have to be investigated in future lessons.

 

After introducing the idea of a family tree through the video, students could begin to construct their own. Students might bring in from home photographs of family members or else draw pictures of their families and arrange them in a family tree structure, possibly using a ready made template. Words such as ‘grandmother’, ‘uncle’ and ‘cousin’ might be introduced as vocabulary words for the topic so that students could then label their family trees. This activity reflects the indicator “identifies and refers to relatives and people in their neighbourhood relevant to their life and their community” for the outcome CCES1 (Board of Studies NSW, 2007, p. 22).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

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Timeglider: web-based timeline software

Timeglider: web-based timeline software | HSIE CCES1 | Scoop.it

Web-based timeline software for creating and sharing history, project planning and more ...

Create, collaborate, and publish zooming and panning interactive timelines. It's like Google Maps,
but for time.

Make history, FAST...

 

Casey Lee Rich's insight:

This site acts as an online software program for creating timelines. The timelines can include visual material such as photographs and documents, alongside dates, names, places and other textual information.

 

Being early stage 1, the teacher would facilitate the creation of a class timeline with direction and suggestions from students. For example, after reading the picture book Lucy’s Family Tree, the class could create a timeline that represents the significant people, places and events of Lucy’s family. This would serve as an example timeline project that the whole class can be involved in before students move on to an individual task. With the class-created ‘timeglider’ timeline as a guide, students would create their own timelines of important events in their lives or the lives of their families. One way in which students could do this would be to draw a series of pictures representing events, including people and places, important to them. They would then cut out and arrange these events in order that they happened and attach them to a length of crepe paper streamer in that order. The timelines could then be displayed around the classroom.

 

In addition, the timeline activities would help students to begin to understand mathematical concepts around time, including chronology, dates and the months of the year. These activities reflect the indicators “recounts events and situations involving themselves and others”, “sequences events and stages in their own life and in the lives of others”, “describes changes in their life, changes in their family and changes in other families”, “communicates information about change” and, “uses everyday vocabulary associated with understanding time and change, eg before, after, then, now” for the outcome CCES1 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, pp. 22, 24).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

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Family - Australian Museum

Family - Australian Museum | HSIE CCES1 | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a complex system of family relations, where each person knows their kin and their land.
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

While it is ideal that teachers consult with Indigenous individuals and involve them in classroom learning around Aboriginal heritage and culture, where this is not possible it is crucial that teachers have accurate information to support their teaching of these topics. The Australian Museum website is an excellent teacher’s resource as it provides extensive information on Indigenous culture. This page in particular contains detailed and clearly presented information regarding Indigenous family or kinship systems. The site draws the link between family and culture, which builds upon the work the children will have already completed around global perspectives.

 

Using the information given, teachers will be able to highlight for students the possible differences, or perhaps in some cases similarities, of Aboriginal family systems and values, including the importance of elders and the community approach to raising children. The site also connects the concept of kinship to storytelling, and the passing of information down through generations. The students might be able to relate by sharing stories that they have been told by their parents or grandparents or other relatives.

 

The website also looks at the types of toys and games used by children in Indigenous families, highlighting the different kinds of activities enjoyed by different families in different cultures. As a class activity, the teacher might seek to build similar toys or replicate some of the games, first ensuring that it is appropriate and not disrespectful to do so.

 

To consolidate the students’ learning of Aboriginal heritage, if possible the teacher might organise an excursion to the Australian Museum’s Indigenous Australians Exhibition. Students might then write a brief account or give a short speech detailing what they have learned on the topic, comparing different perspectives of family and where they fit within these. It is important that throughout lessons involving Indigenous perspectives that the content is treated with respect by both teacher and students.

 

These activities align with the indicators “listens to and talks about stories of other families and their heritage, including countries of origin and Aboriginality” and “identifies items relevant to the heritage of people from other cultures” for the outcome CCES1 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 22).

 

All of the resources presented here provide opportunities for lessons and activities in which students cover the first three subject matter points in the HSIE Syllabus content overview. These are: events and stages in their lifetimes; family origins, including country of origin; and, people in their families, past and present (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 43).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

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Lucy's Family Tree

Lucy's Family Tree | HSIE CCES1 | Scoop.it
When Lucy's class is given a family tree assignment, Lucy asks her parents to write her a note to excuse her from the assignment.
Casey Lee Rich's insight:

Lucy’s Family Tree is a picture book by Karen Halvorsen Schreck that provides students with a global perspective of family heritage. Like the students themselves, Lucy is working with family trees in her class at school. However, having been adopted from Mexico, Lucy is concerned at first that her family tree will be too different. The book effectively communicates to students, through engagement with story and illustration, that all families will have similarities and differences.

 

This is a resource that can be used to introduce the idea of perspective, and in particular of a global perspective. Having already constructed their own family trees in previous lessons, students might be asked to reflect on the experience of creating their trees in light of the story they have just read. Did they have similar concerns to Lucy about their family tree? Students might be asked to compare their family trees in small groups and report back to the class with any similarities or differences.

 

The book might also be used to lead on to activities around discovering the different countries of origin of students and their families. For example, the class could create a world map upon which they could place markers with their names on them in the countries where they or their family have come from. Some students may have more than one country. This visual representation would effectively demonstrate the diversity of the classroom. This would then lead on to the fourth resource below, family crests.

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Education Center Activity: Family Crest

Children can begin to think about their family histories and their own lives by making a family crest.

 

BACKGROUNDDiscuss family crests. Then brainstorm with children to get ideas that could represent their family histories or lives. Here are just a few of the many possibilities:

 

Flags that represent the countries their families came fromPictures of foods that are common to their ethnicityPictures that represent first or last namesDrawings that depict favorite family eventsPhotos that show family celebrations

WHAT YOU NEED

A large piece of paper, at least 11"x14"The picturesCrayons, markers, pencilAn outline of a shield cut from oak tagGlue (optional)

WHAT TO DO

On the large piece of paper, trace the oak tag shield or draw an outline of any shape (such as an oval).

 

Divide the shape into three or four equal sections.

 

In each section, draw a picture that represents one idea about your family. Some children may prefer to cut out pictures from magazines or use a family photograph. Another alternative is to use a computer, since this activity can be done easily with any drawing program.

 

Laminate the finished crests, if possible.

 

Have children share and compare their crests

Casey Lee Rich's insight:

This site provides instructions on how students can create their own family crests. After having completed their family trees, timelines and explored the countries of origin, students should be beginning to have an idea of their family history. The family crest activity is designed to help students create something that reflects what it is that makes their family special. Students decide on a number of pictures or symbols that represent important aspects of their family and history. Students would engage in research to determine for example the national flag, food, sport or other images unique to their country of origin. They might also include family photographs or drawings of special events or places specific and personal to their family.

 

The activity allows the students the choice to bring together the things that are meaningful to them in relation to their heritage and fosters their own self-awareness, identity, and sense of belonging through placing themselves within the context of their family history.

 

This activity aligns with the indicators “recalls aspects of their family heritage, including countries their relatives came from, valued family possessions and religious practices” and “locates items relevant to their heritage to share with the class” for the outcome CCES1 (Board of Studies NSW, 2006, p. 22).

 

Board of Studies NSW. (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney, Australia: Board of Studies NSW.

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