How will robotics change lives in the near future
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How will robotics change lives in the near future
how will robotics affect lives in the near future
Curated by cassian bulger
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Rescooped by cassian bulger from Robotics in Manufacturing Today
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Automate 2013: Innovative Robotiq Gripper and Teach System Address Growing Market Need - Robotics Business Review

Automate 2013: Innovative Robotiq Gripper and Teach System Address Growing Market Need - Robotics Business Review | How will robotics change lives in the near future | Scoop.it

Can grasp, pinch or pick parts with a variety of forces and handle flat, square, cylindrical or irregular shapes


Via ManufacturingStories
cassian bulger's insight:

In my opinion this is one of the directions that robotics should be heading in, many people would say that robotics such as this would always put people out of work and this arguement has been made by people for years and while initially it may be true society has now i believe adapted to this idea and will continue to adapt as robotics such as this make life intensly easyer for the average worker in the long run, also in the long run it forces society to adapt to situations where the jobs are obsolete, lifting the overall education levels to provide further advancements in all fields.

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Rescooped by cassian bulger from Tracking the Future
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Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar

Groundbreaking Virtual Robotics Allow Us Our Very Own Robot Avatar | How will robotics change lives in the near future | Scoop.it

A research group lead by Professor Tachi at Keio University in Japan is currently working on one of the first incarnations of an avatar that incorporates some pretty cool virtual robotics technology. By slipping on a pair of virtual reality gloves and a helmet, you would be able to control and see the world through your avatar’s eyes. The concept behind this virtual robotics technology is really called Telexistence, and it allows us to control a real avatar robot.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
cassian bulger's insight:

Technology such as this which provides an avatar that can be operated remotely has infinite potential to make the lives of countless people easyer such robots provide an "out of body" experience and when perfected can enable working remotly and remotly carrying out daily chores. With strides like this technology is taking remarkable strides into how we are shaping our future. 

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Mercor's curator insight, March 22, 2013 7:03 AM

Rescooped by ManufacturingStories from How will robotics change lives in the near future onto Robotics in Manufacturing Today

Rescooped by cassian bulger from Robotics in Manufacturing Today
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Lego Robot Folds and Flings a Paper Airplane

Lego Robot Folds and Flings a Paper Airplane | How will robotics change lives in the near future | Scoop.it
NXTLOG user hknssn13 built this amazing paper airplane machine. My favorite part is the 4th stage, where four linear actuators make the final folds in the airplane. It looks sick when the entire assembly rises up!

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman, ManufacturingStories
cassian bulger's insight:

inovative ideas such as these making robotics available to the general public are ingenious in my opinion as they help society adapt to robotics aswell as bring the awe in seeing what you can create.

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Rescooped by cassian bulger from Amazing Science
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Human, AI and Robotics: Man Walks With Aid of Brain-Controlled Robotic Legs for the First Time

Human, AI and Robotics: Man Walks With Aid of Brain-Controlled Robotic Legs for the First Time | How will robotics change lives in the near future | Scoop.it

Walking on a treadmill is no great feat, unless your legs are being moved by a robotic device connected to your brain. A new brain-computer interface allows a person to walk using a pair of mechanical leg braces controlled by brain signals (above), as reported on arXiv. The device has only been tested on able-bodied people, and while it has limitations, it lays a foundation for helping people with paralysis walk again. The new device — developed by researchers at the Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of California, Irvine – is controlled by electroencephalogram, or EEG, signals generated by small voltage fluctuations in the brain. The method is completely noninvasive, as the signals are measured by a cap worn on the scalp.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
cassian bulger's insight:

The article shows the use of robotic limbs that are currently being experimented with this is an amazing technology for people that have lost there arms or legs and previously nothing could be done to restore function to the severed arm or leg. The release of medical robotics such as this will surley affect many lives around the world now and in the future where the advances in medical robotics can only improve.

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