How We Learn
49 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

Is Connectivism a Learning Theory or a Phenomenon?

Is Connectivism a Learning Theory or a Phenomenon? | How We Learn | Scoop.it
Connectivism: Its place in theory-informed research and innovation in technology-enabled learning
Thomas J Okon's insight:

In my continual quest to understand how we learn, I recently found this  paper on Connectivism.

Connectivism has been under fire recently. See Stephen Downes response to one such instance here  http://halfanhour.blogspot.com/2013/07/connectvism-and-primal-scream.html

This research report by Frances Bell brings up some interesting critiques of Connectivism as a learning theory. Though it is from 2011, the questions she ask's and the points that are made still seem valid today. It questions whether connectivism can truly replace other learning theories whether it can just complement them, or can in fact even be called a learning theory.

Connectivism aspires to redefine learning within the diverse contexts identified in the Introduction and to deliver a learning theory

for the digital age. This is a tall order for so young a theory, as it is yet untested: This may account for its lack of rigour. In this paper, the author not only looks for one learning theory but rather theories that will help us to understand and make changes as learners, teachers, and learning technologists in this evolving context.

Frances Bell argues that connectivism makes its contribution mainly as a phenomenon, “a thing as it appears, rather thanas a thing in itself. Therefore, If connectivism is insufficient, the question remains: Which theories are needed to learn and

make change in this dynamic, sociotechnical environment?

That is still open to debate. She says that we cannot yet expect a single, all-encompassing theory in this context for learning, if indeed we ever could.

There are other theories like Actor-network theory (Latour,2005)

Example: Flexible learning (Bigum & Rowan,2004); Social Learning Theory (Stewart & Williams, 2005; Williams, Stewart, & Slack;  Vygotsky’s ZPD(Chaiklin, 2003) Example: (Griffiths & Light, 2010) and Third-generation activity theory (Engeström, 2001). Example: (Engeström & Kerosuo, 2007).

The final conclusion of this article determines that in the current dynamic context for learning and education, connectivism alone is insufficient as a theory to inform learning and its technology-enabled support  in an internetworked world, and that as the scope of changes in learning enabled by technologies increases, so does our need to expand the repertoire of theories and research approaches.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion

Learning to learn: losing yourself in passion | How We Learn | Scoop.it
Thomas J Okon's insight:

This article brings up some good points. It is geared toward adults but it also is appropiate for a younger audience.

So what can we teach younger students about learning to learn?

 

We should ask students if  there is a topic that they constantly find themselves coming back to in their reading and conversations? One that, once you start reading about it, the hours pass like minutes?

Asking them to think about this, can stir up their passion for a subject, which then may lead them dive in to it further, through research and other experiences.

Getting students used to this process of investigating their interests, may induce them take the same steps when researching required material in their classes. Then they are not just learning, but also learning how to learn. This may lead to happy fullfilled lifelong learners.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

Stephen Downes on Connectivism, Online Learning, and the MOOC

Stephen Downes on Connectivism, Online Learning, and the MOOC | How We Learn | Scoop.it

From Stephen's Web an online WizIQ presentation that looks mostly at the concept of learning theories and MOOCs.

Thomas J Okon's insight:

I thought I knew what Connectivism and Connected Learning were. I've written about them, I've read and curated many articles. Well here's a new deeper understanding explained by Stephen Downes, one of the founders of Connectivism and MOOC's. He speaks about Knowledge- its not just in the network- Knowledge IS the network. And about Learning - The "Downes Theory". Then finally, Community- education is not about remembering a body of predifined content, its about the citizens communicating what they know with each other.

Its a long piece, but well worth hearing (or you can have a look at the Slideshare). You'll likely learn something new, or expand your understanding, like I often do when reading Stephen's writings.

more...
Terry Elliott's comment, June 24, 2013 8:52 PM
Thanks for this. We need more work on long term projects, long reading and the slow MOOC (akin to the slow food movement).
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

RELATE- Research in Learning, Assessing and Tutoring Effectively

RELATE- Research in Learning, Assessing and Tutoring Effectively | How We Learn | Scoop.it
Thomas J Okon's insight:

Prof. David E. Pritchard and his team discuss that improving education using computers is the mantra of education in the 21st century. The learning potential of interactive environments, and the associated scalability and economy of internet delivery, beg for creative and thoughtful development. The RELATE program has as its broad objective the improvement of learning and pedagogy in interactive environments. Key to this is the  development of integrated assessment tools with unprecedented reliability. They believe that accurate assessment of all educational innovations – not just electronic ones – is crucial to improving the mixed educational results of educational reform in the 20th century.


Their studies imply that, of the various instructional elements in the course, electronic tutorial – type homework generates by far the most student learning as displayed by score improvement on the MIT final and is comparable to group problems on standard tests of conceptual understanding. They have developed extraordinarily accurate assessmentbased on the process of a student working through a tutorial. Although integrated seamlessly within the instructional activities, it has the power to assess student’s skills on a fine grid of topics, allowing targeted tutoring to improve students’ scores as well as prediction of students’ performances on high stakes tests. They have even developed techniques to measure the learning from individual tutorials. For example, they recently developed ability to accurately measure the amount learned per unit of student time on a single tutorial allows comparison and improvement at the micro level. This will allow them to improve tutoring both by improving the individual tutorials and by determining what pedagogy (e.g. tutorial-first vs. problem-first instruction) works best. They have also found evidence for the effectiveness of hints in arriving at the correct solutions. Further studies on this will help improve the hint structure and would increase their effectiveness in tutoring.


http://relate.mit.edu

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

A Pedagogical Framework for a Polyphonic form of Teaching

A Pedagogical Framework for a Polyphonic form of Teaching | How We Learn | Scoop.it
The Pedagogical Framework of eDidaktik.dk can form the basis for an assessment of, whether a digital learning tool is suitable for use in teaching. ICT pedagogy
Thomas J Okon's insight:

Here is a new pedagogial framework based on a distiction between a monological, a dialogical and a polyphonic form of teaching. The tree forms of teaching are derived from  M.M. Bakhtin's novel theory.

The process used for the polyphonic form of this framework bares some resemblance to the learning theory of constructivism, which states that learning is an active process of constructing knowledge rather than acquiring it. Knowledge is constructed based on personal experiences and hypotheses of the environment. 


According to Niels Jakob Pasgaard, in the polyphonic form, the objective is for students and teachers to gain mutual understanding and knowledge through dialogue and collaboration where both parties act as co-learners. The polyphonic form is based on the idea that knowledge is created through an exchange of many different individuals' perceptions of the world, and learning is seen as the student's participation in this mutual exchange. Communication within this form of teaching thus becomes polyphonic, and is initiated and controlled by both teacher and students. Whereas the teacher is seen as an expert within the monological and the dialogical forms, she has the role of an equal collaborator in the polyphonic form.

Social constructivism also emphasizes the importance of the learner being actively involved in the learning process, as opposed to depending on the teacher to deliver knowledge while the learner passively receives it.

 

This framework, while not actually referencing constructivism, appears to lay out a pedagogy that can take advantage of constructivisms theory of how we learn.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

How to Make Online Courses Massively Personal: Scientific American

How to Make Online Courses Massively Personal: Scientific American | How We Learn | Scoop.it
How thousands of online students can get the effect of one-on-one tutoring
Thomas J Okon's insight:

This article discusses that educators have known for 30 years that students perform and learn better when given one-on-one tutoring and mastery learning—working on a subject until it is mastered, not just until a test is scheduled.

Peter Norvig makes a case for technology as a possible way to help teachers make their couses more effective by using online learning as a tool.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

How typeface influences the way we read and think and learn?

How typeface influences the way we read and think and learn? | How We Learn | Scoop.it
And why everyone hates Comic Sans MS
Thomas J Okon's insight:

Is learning affected by typface? Can a lesson, a website or an e-learning program be affected by it's typeface? This article unearths fascinating research on how people respond to various typefaces and how they can affect what we think about the words we are reading. Though it does not specifically refer to it's influences on learning, it brings up some important factors to consider when designing learning resources.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Thomas J Okon
Scoop.it!

Making Learning Connected

A Connected Learning Massively Open Online Collaboration
Thomas J Okon's insight:

If you are interested in Connected Learning or want to find out what its like to be a connected learner. This MOOC, which they are calling a Massive Open Online Collaboration sounds like a great experience.

 

 

Some Background:

It has been proposed that we need new visions of learning better suited to the increasing complexity, connectivity, and velocity of our new knowledge society. We now have the capability to reimagine where, when, and how learning takes place.

Connected learning seeks to tie together the respected historical body of research on how we best learn with the opportunities made available through today’s networked and digital media.

 

Connected learning environments are populated with people who share interests and are contributing to a common purpose. Today’s social media and web-based communities provide exceptional opportunities for learners in diverse and specialized areas of interest to engage in shared projects and inquiry.

 

Connected learning environments are designed around production, providing tools and opportunities for learners to produce, circulate, curate, and comment on media. Learning that comes from actively creating, making, producing, experimenting, remixing, decoding, and designing, fosters skills and dispositions for lifelong learning and productive contributions to today’s rapidly changing work and political conditions.

 

Connected learning environments are designed around networks that link together institutions and groups across various sectors, including popular culture, educational institutions, home, and interest communities. Learning resources, tools, and materials are abundant, accessible and visible across these settings and available through open, networked platforms.

 

Via http://connectedlearning.tv/what-is-connected-learning

and:

Ito, Mizuko, Kris Gutiérrez, Sonia Livingstone, Bill Penuel, Jean Rhodes, Katie Salen, Juliet Schor, Julian Sefton-Green, S. Craig Watkins. 2013. Connected Learning: An Agenda for Research and Design. Irvine, CA: Digital Media and Learning Research Hub. 

more...
Terry Elliott's comment, June 24, 2013 8:54 PM
I am in charge of Week 4 of the clmooc and am still in a quandary as to what to do. Good summing up/curating here that reminds me of our original purpose.
Thomas J Okon's comment, June 25, 2013 12:01 PM
Thanks for your comments Terry- Perhaps for week 4 we could do a collaborative project involving all clmooc members. A combined Pintirest or Learnist board. Each member finding or inventing an example of a project that would -as in your write up- encourage youth to pursue and document the ideas that matter to them while simultaneously helping them to use a critical lens? Kind of a Make Bank all tied together on this theme. My two cents :)