Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
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Paul Ryan Says Climate Change Is Just An Excuse For Obama To Raise Taxes

Paul Ryan Says Climate Change Is Just An Excuse For Obama To Raise Taxes | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) said Wednesday that “climate change occurs no matter what,” but that the EPA’s recent efforts to reduce emissions from existing power plants are “outside of the confines of the law,” and “an excuse to grow government, raise taxes and slow down economic growth.”


Via SustainOurEarth
Jocelyn Stoller's insight:

Deluded and hateful fool

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Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Our brains have many glitches that interfere with honest self-awareness and accurate self-assessment
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The proto-reliabilist hypothesis - Experimental Philosophy

The proto-reliabilist hypothesis - Experimental Philosophy | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

I conducted a simple study to determine whether knowledge, ordinarily understood, requires reliability.

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Reclaiming Peace after Emotional Fireworks.

Reclaiming Peace after Emotional Fireworks. | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Physically and emotionally out of control, I lashed out with my hands, my words and all the "negative" emotions I had stockpiled.

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A graphical abstract opens the door to your research publication

A graphical abstract opens the door to your research publication | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

How to use a graphical abstract as a tool to get more people to read your scientific publication

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Six degrees of separation? Facebook finds a smaller number

Six degrees of separation? Facebook finds a smaller number | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

"Just think of yourself as being that much closer to the actor Kevin Bacon ..."


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Secrets to Confidence, Empathy & Happiness: reading literary fiction can improve our levels of empathy and social skills

Secrets to Confidence, Empathy & Happiness: reading literary fiction can improve our levels of empathy and social skills | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Reading can bring us happiness, increase empathy and give us the confidence we need. Scientific America  published an article suggesting the data from a study conducted by social psychologist Emanuele Castano in New York found that reading literary fiction can improve our levels of empathy and social skills. This way we are able to relate better with others and build stronger, lasting and meaningful relationships and impact how happy we feel.


Vera Nazarian


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3quarksdaily: Everything About Everything: David Foster Wallace’s ‘Infinite Jest’ at 20

3quarksdaily: Everything About Everything: David Foster Wallace’s ‘Infinite Jest’ at 20 | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

An Eclectic Digest of Science, Art and Literature

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Online therapy can help those affected by body dysmorphic disorder

Online therapy can help those affected by body dysmorphic disorder | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help people affected by body dysmorphic disorder, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

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These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art

These Paintings Turn Climate Data Into Art | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Maine-based artist Jill Pelto is turning hard climate data into haunting watercolor paintings.

Via Susan Davis Cushing
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Susan Davis Cushing's curator insight, February 6, 6:28 PM

great teaching tool!

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Research: College Students More Distracted Than Ever

Research: College Students More Distracted Than Ever | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
A study published in the Journal of Media Education this week reported that students spend a fifth of their time in class doing things on their devices that have nothing to do with their school work.

Via Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D., Miloš Bajčetić
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Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, January 23, 11:09 PM

I'm shocked, shocked . . . .

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Stories from the sky: astronomy in Indigenous knowledge

Stories from the sky: astronomy in Indigenous knowledge | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Indigenous Australian practices, developed and honed over thousands of years, weave science with storytelling.


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ToKTutor's curator insight, January 22, 3:28 PM

Titles 1, 2 & 4: A network of language, perception & intuition evolved to ensure survival & value of indigenous knowledge.   

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The Psychology of What Makes a Great Story

The Psychology of What Makes a Great Story | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

"The great writer's gift to a reader is to make him a better writer."

 

“Stories,” Neil Gaiman asserted in his wonderful lecture on what makes stories last, “are genuinely symbiotic organisms that we live with, that allow human beings to advance.” But what is the natural selection of these organisms — what makes the ones that endure fit for survival? What, in other words, makes a great story?


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Mike Donahue's curator insight, January 24, 11:21 AM

This contains some great insights from Bruner and others that can help anyone approach their storytelling challenges in more effective ways.

Chris Carter's curator insight, January 25, 7:51 PM

The monomyth lives!

Andre Piazza's curator insight, January 29, 4:40 PM

#Storytelling

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Trust is everything for a Leader

Trust is everything for a Leader | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Can there be Leadership without Trust? I invite you to read this short story: A little girl and her father were crossing a bridge. The father was kind of scared so he asked his little daughter:

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 21, 3:42 PM

Human relationships need trust. Think of any successful relationship and trust is the cement that holds it together. We do not manage healthy relationships.They somehow happen organically.

 

Gert Biesta argued that we have replaced relational language of someone teaching someone with a discourse of learnification.

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A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you

A Harvard psychologist says people judge you based on 2 criteria when they first meet you | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
From Yahoo Finance: People size you up in seconds, but what exactly are they evaluating? Harvard Business School...

Via Tiago
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6 Things to Remember About Those Who Are Grieving

6 Things to Remember About Those Who Are Grieving | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Sometimes showing that you see them and their pain is enough.

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Upscaling your images will not get you published

Upscaling your images will not get you published | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

upscaling your scientific figures will lead to rejection because of quality problems when you try to publish in peer reviewed scientific journals

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Why The Rules Of The Road Aren’t Enough To Prevent People From Dying

Why The Rules Of The Road Aren’t Enough To Prevent People From Dying | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The death was ruled an accident, and there’s no evidence anybody broke the law. But does that mean we should view this tragedy as unavoidable?

Via Rob Duke
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Mary Grubbs's comment, February 9, 1:48 PM
I had no idea that the limits were set at 85%. Traveling in Alaska for me can be stressful at times. When I travel during the winter from Fairbanks to Wasilla. I have the semi's that fly by you and the snow from the top of their vehicles blind you for a moment and during that moment I am just hoping no animal will be on the other side. Even without the semi's we have the curved roads, long drop offs, narrow two lane roads, and of course the moose. I definitely take advantage of the speed limit of 65mph, but I would not be disappointed if it was ever lowered to 55mph in order to be that much safer. As far as in the cities themselves, I believe lowering the limits would be very beneficial. It appears to be working for them and possibly working for New York.
William Estrin's comment, February 9, 5:50 PM
What people don't understand is that speed limits are designed and set for safety, not to impede you, frustrate you, or get you to your destination late. Unfortunately, Americans are impatient and have a need for speed, which aren't helped by pop culture. Speed limits are carefully set by engineers as a safe travel speed. Yet people are naive and think they are wiser. If something unexpected comes up, you need a certain amount of stopping distance to avoid a catastrophe and going too fast will not give you the necessary stopping distance. This may be less visible in urban areas, but in rural areas, the importance of obeying speed becomes more obvious, especially in Alaska. In rural Alaska, there are sharp blind corners with steep drop offs. So when I see a sign with a picture of a curve and it says 35 or 40, I know sure as hell that I better slow down to that speed limit and even slower in the winter, otherwise I risk running off the road. For example, the Haul Road here in Alaska has a speed of 50 mph the whole 414 miles. It is the most remote road in America and there are hardly any state troopers or police along it. Does that mean truckers and other drivers fly by at 80 and 90 mph on the road? The answer is an astounding no because people know the speed limit is there for a reason. You will be punished if you don't obey that speed limit, but not necessarily by police. Mother nature and the laws of physics have their own set of consequences in store for you if you don't obey the speed limit. I just wish people understood the importance of speed limits in urban areas as they do in treacherous rural areas.
mlsoden's comment, February 11, 12:51 PM
While reasonable and well written traffic laws, combined with rigorous enforcement can have an impact on poor driving a better approach would be to require additional training prior to granting licenses to driver's. Currently Alaska has a relatively limited training program requirement to get a license, a written test and a short road test. Many other countries have much more stringent training guidelines for drivers, and their traffic collision and infraction rates reflect this. Mandatory driver training courses, combined with restricted or limited licenses for all drivers for a probationary period could address this issue. Proper funding of police departments and infrastructure upgrades, like signal cameras and road improvements could help make roadways safer for operators. Unfortunately there is a feeling that driving is a right in this country and actually enacting these types of programs would face stiff opposition.
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We don’t need better leaders

We don’t need better leaders | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Via Peter Vander Auwera
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Peter Vander Auwera's curator insight, February 7, 12:20 PM

"Positional leadership is a master-servant, parent-child, teacher-student, employer-employee relationship. It puts too much power in the hands of individuals and blocks human networks from realizing their potential. In the network era, leadership is helping the network make better decisions"