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'Homeless Jesus' provokes debate on what it means to be Christian - Religion News Service

'Homeless Jesus' provokes debate on what it means to be Christian - Religion News Service | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
(RNS) “Homeless Jesus” was bolted down in February, beside a bronze plaque with the familiar words from Matthew 25:40 -- “Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me.”
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Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Our brains have many glitches that interfere with honest self-awareness and accurate self-assessment
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Preview: The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative | Moyers & Company | BillMoyers.com

Preview: The Conscience of a Compassionate Conservative | Moyers & Company | BillMoyers.com | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
The president of the American Enterprise Institute says free enterprise is good for the poor – and good for the soul.
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Tea Party support linked to educational segregation, new study shows // University of Notre Dame

Tea Party support linked to educational segregation, new study shows // University of Notre Dame | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

In January 2009, Barack Obama assumed the U.S. presidency in the midst of the most severe recession since the great depression of the 1930s. While many Americans hoped the new administration would take an active role in providing relief for those harmed by the economic collapse, a “Tea Party” movement emerged to oppose Obama’s agenda.

University of Notre Dame political sociologist Rory McVeigh, whose study “Educational Segregation, Tea Party Organizations, and Battles over Distributive Justice” was recently published in the American Sociological Review, says, “The political polarization that we witness today is linked to the way in which Americans live in segregated worlds.”

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Brain Scientists Learn To Alter And Even Erase Memories

Brain Scientists Learn To Alter And Even Erase Memories | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Memories, it turns out, are malleable, and brain scientists are learning to alter and erase them, raising some hopes of possible treatments for memory disorders like Alzheimer's disease.
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Morning People Are More Likely to Lie to Their Bosses in the Afternoon

Morning People Are More Likely to Lie to Their Bosses in the Afternoon | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
And night owls tend to be less ethical in the morning—but siestas might make everyone behave a little better.
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Global Trends Survey | Home

Ipsos MORI Global Trends 2014. 200+ question survey covers 20 countries featuring everything from marriage to mealtimes, from personal ambition to advertising, from society to social media.
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White lies keep society intact

White lies keep society intact | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Small fibs bring communities closer together
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2014 Conference - Society For Neuroeconomics

Our annual conference, Neuroeconomics: Decision Making and the Brain, aims to promote interdisciplinary collaborations and discussions on topics lying at the intersection of the brain and decision sciences in the hopes of advancing both theory and...
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'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says

'Big picture' thinking doesn't always lead people to indulge less, study says | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Buy the latest electronic gizmo du jour, or use that money to fix a leaky roof? Go out with friends, or stay home to catch-up on work to meet that looming deadline?
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Neil deGrasse Tyson: America Will 'Sink Lower' Before Congress Acts On Climate Change

Neil deGrasse Tyson: America Will 'Sink Lower' Before Congress Acts On Climate Change | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson predicted during an interview with Salon published Wednesday that climate change will have to "get very bad" before Congress feels threatened enough to advance meaningful environmental legislation.

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Time Teasers: Structured Procrastination

Time Teasers: Structured Procrastination | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Image credit: Dan Kleinan

A recent article in the New York Times highlighting the oft-overlooked
malady of “precrastination” gives us an opportunity to discuss some of the
downsides of our own intuitions in relation to existing time management
systems.

As the article points out, “people appear to be wired to incur a
significant physical cost to eliminate a mental burden.” When applied to
time management, this often results in what Dan Ariely refers to as
“structured procrastination”.

Structured procrastination involves getting little, relatively
insignificant things done, in an attempt to “eliminate a mental burden” --
in this case the burden of having many things on your plate. With a
standard to-do list, we have a long list of potential activities that vie
for our time, and we need to pick and choose which of all these things to
take care of first. Not surprisingly, this leads to us checking off those
things that are quick and easy to finish (and thus give us the joy of
checking them off quicker), as opposed to the things that are difficult but
also likely to be important.

On top of the drive to attend first to the small things (and maybe never
getting to the large ones), we also generally waste a great deal of time on
the maintenance of small tasks -- just writing them down and then ticking
them off of our to-do lists.  This is of course a fantastic way to feel
productive, but it mostly results in putting off the things that we should
really be focusing on: the looming project, the awkward phone call, the
term paper.

Getting mentally demanding tasks done requires solidifying our commitment
to these tasks. Research suggests that simply scheduling things leads to a
much higher rate of completion, which is why we developed Timeful’s smart
suggestions. We think having a proactive calendar that reminds us about
truly important tasks is crucial to developing the behavior that will curb
precrastination and procrastination both.


Here’s Dan on the problem of structured procrastination:

Via Alessandro Cerboni
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How to get motivated, according to science

How to get motivated, according to science | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

“ Research says to stop being so rational. Get those emotions going instead.”


Via Garth Sanginiti
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Garth Sanginiti's curator insight, July 23, 5:43 PM
"For most people studied, the first step toward improving their job performance had nothing to do with the job itself but instead with improving how they felt about themselves. In fact, for eight in ten people, self-image matters more in how they rate their job performance than does their actual job performance. - Gribble 2000 [The 100 Simple Secrets of Successful People]"
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Rethinking Economics

Rethinking Economics | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

We are an international network of students, thinkers and citizens...

...coming together to demystify, diversify, and invigorate economics.

We are thirsty for new ways of thinking. The economics we have been studying does not fit the economy we are living in.

We organise around the world. We are one of the founding members of theInternational Student Initiative for Pluralism in Economics (ISIPE).


Want to get involved? Read our organising aims and principles.

We are a non-partisan group. We are always looking for more organisers and collaborators.

Get involved and sign up to our mailing list!


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Expert violinists can't tell old from new

Expert violinists can't tell old from new | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

In PNAS, Fritz et al. (1) follow up their groundbreaking 2012 paper with what will probably be the final nail in the coffin for those who would believe that old musical instruments sound demonstrably better than new instruments. Their study used six prized instruments, Stradivari and Guarneri “del Gesu” violins, and six modern violins. World class violinists who were literally blind to provenance (the violinists wore goggles that dramatically reduced their ability to see) were given two opportunities to play them: in a small salon and in a concert hall. They were allowed to bring a friend to act as a second judge. Their task was to rank order the violins in terms of desirability and to label them as old vs. new. These highly trained and highly discerning musicians utterly failed at detecting old vs. new and showed no consistent preferences.

The study balanced rigor with real-world considerations and represents the most ecologically valid conditions possible while maintaining strict experimental protocols. Yet, intriguingly, the participants themselves remained unconvinced, even after having seen the results with their own eyes (or heard them with their own ears). Said one, “the one thing that you cannot put into a new violin is that it’s been played for 300 years—these instruments change and develop.” Said another, “I would absolutely buy a new instrument, but for a later generation. They need to be broken in” (2).

Why is it that musicians and scientists reach different conclusions when considering the same data? This arises in part due to different ways of knowing things. Scientists know what they know through systematic observation of the external world, mediated by replicable experiments and objective measurement. Artists know what they know through emotional experience, subjectivity, and intuition. When they …

 


Via Alessandro Cerboni
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Chief Happiness Officer Is the Latest, Creepiest Job in Corporate America

Chief Happiness Officer Is the Latest, Creepiest Job in Corporate America | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
You will be happy, dammit. And Big Brother will make sure of it.
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Why Mindful Individuals Make Better Decisions - INSEAD Knowledge

Why Mindful Individuals Make Better Decisions - INSEAD Knowledge | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

“Why Mindful Individuals Make Better Decisions INSEAD Knowledge Five years ago when I introduced mindfulness to my MBA decision-making class it was perceived as something completely esoteric; there were maybe two or three students who could relate...”


Via Luis Valdes
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How Culture Shapes Our Hallucinations

How Culture Shapes Our Hallucinations | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that schizophrenic people in more collectivist societies sometimes think their auditory hallucinations are helpful.
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Clarifying Sam Harris’ clarifications

Clarifying Sam Harris’ clarifications | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
by Dwayne Holmes [Editor’s note: this essay is an expansion and follow up to the author’s submission to the contest organized by Sam Harris for the best criticism of his arguments on science and et...
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The strange relationship between global warming denial and…speaking English

The strange relationship between global warming denial and…speaking English | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Climate denial isn't a worldwide delusion. It's a distinctly Anglophone one.
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Brain scans find signs of financial bubbles

Brain scans find signs of financial bubbles | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
Watching the brains of those who sell when a bubble's about to burst.
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AUDIO Q&A: Neuroeconomics and the answer to the 'curse of choice'

AUDIO Q&A: Neuroeconomics and the answer to the 'curse of choice' | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
We are faced with a myriad of choice in our lives - but an emerging body of work suggests the more choice we’re faced with, the more likely we’ll make a poor decision.
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How to Use More Than 10 Percent of Your Brain

How to Use More Than 10 Percent of Your Brain | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

When I saw the trailer for Lucy, a new thriller starring a superhuman Scarlett Johansson, my first thought was: Yes! Hollywood finally cast a black actor as a neuroscientist! And my second thought was bummer, because that neuroscientist, played by Morgan Freeman, immediately discredits himself: “It is estimated most human only use 10 percent of the brain’s capacity,” he says. “Imagine if we could access 100 percent.”


Via Gerald Carey
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Gerald Carey's curator insight, July 23, 6:55 PM

I had a student ask me TODAY about this very movie and this myth!

Facepalm! This has been discredited ages ago but the author does a good job summarising the key reasons why it is almost impossible to use just '10%' of the brain.

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Strategies for Self-Compassion

Strategies for Self-Compassion | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the New England Transcendentalists, was very influential for me as a teenager. I have found many of his essays and aphorisms to be very useful, both personally and professionally. The one pearl I have gotten the most mileage out of is from his essay Love, written in 1841: “Each man sees over his own experience a stain of error, whilst that of other men looks fair and ideal.”


When we compare ourselves to others,
we may feel better or worse
.


It may be more useful to minimize comparison and instead consider our connections to one another and all life forms on the planet if we are working toward building a healthier relationship to the self.


By FRANCES L. HENNESSEY, LICSW 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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The Education of an Ecomodernist -- From Ecoradicalism to Radical Pragmatism

The Education of an Ecomodernist  -- From Ecoradicalism to Radical Pragmatism | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it
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Moving and Money Mindsets: How Buying a House Requires Couples to Engage in Many Financial Conversations - KBK Wealth Connection

Moving and Money Mindsets: How Buying a House Requires Couples to Engage in Many Financial Conversations - KBK Wealth Connection | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

“Make time to meet with clients and teach them about money mindsets and healthy financial conversations.”


Via Luis Valdes
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How Artificial Superintelligence Will Give Birth To Itself

How Artificial Superintelligence Will Give Birth To Itself | Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots | Scoop.it

There's a saying among futurists that a human-equivalent artificial intelligence will be our last invention. After that, AIs will be capable of designing virtually anything on their own — including themselves.


Via LeapMind
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